Author Topic: Manchego without Lipase  (Read 3188 times)

Offline saycheese

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Manchego without Lipase
« on: January 11, 2009, 06:09:49 PM »
My husband didn't care too much for the Manchego with lipase in it.  He said it was too sour.  To me it just tasted more like feta.  So, today I just finished making a manchego without lipase.  If it is still too sour for Michael's taste, then I will need to look at my thermometer that I am using to make sure it is registering accurately as well as revisiting sanitation procedures.  We'll know in about 5 days after the Manchego ages a bit.

Had a minor problem with trying to make whey ricotta after this recipe was made.  I had put in some heavy whipping cream hoping to increase yield, I got absolutely nothing, so I put the pot back on the stove and brought it to about 180F still nothing, but after I let it sit for awhile it looks like there may be some activity there.  We'll see.

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2009, 06:57:44 PM »
Please let us know about the Lipase.

Just for your information, although you probably already know, Lipase should be stored in the freezer and you need to rehydate it 30 mintues before pitching at room temp.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Tea

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2009, 11:43:25 PM »
Say Cheese you know that you are to add a little vinegar to get the cheese to curdle?

Just wondering as you didn't mention it.

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2009, 12:20:58 AM »
I don't add vinegar to my machego it just uses half thermophilic and half mesophilic.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline saycheese

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2009, 12:03:08 PM »
Interesting, the recipe didn't call for that, it was more like what Cartierusm said - 1/4 tsp. mesophilic and 1/4 tsp. thermophilic starters.  Just took the cheese out of its brine bath this morning and dried it off good.  Then, into the cheese cave it goes.

Offline Tea

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2009, 02:03:29 PM »
Say Cheese I'm sorry I wasn't clear in that post at all.  I was refering to the ricotta, not the manchego.
The ricotta needs vinegar to turn. 

My apologies.

Offline saycheese

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2009, 05:47:35 PM »
Yes, I tried the vinegar and also some fresh lemon juice, but nothing seemed to work.  I think the fact that the whipping cream was ultra pasteurized messed the whole thing up.  Not going to do that again!

Offline Tea

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2009, 02:32:48 PM »
mmm maybe it was the cream.  I have found the UHT products to be difficult at the best of times.

Offline saycheese

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2009, 10:12:48 AM »
The manchego without lipase is aging nicely, no mold, no strong smells, staying dry in its tupperware container in the cheese cave.  I've been toying with the idea of coating it with oil and a laot of chopped dried rosemary, but maybe I'll save that for the next one. 

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2009, 01:30:26 PM »
I would until you find if the problem is your cheese or your husband's palate.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline saycheese

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2009, 01:39:19 PM »
Well, we tried a small slice ofthe Manchego without lipase and it got the thumbs up from Michael regarding flavor.  It is mild, no bitterness at all.  We rubbed olive oil over its surface and put it back in its tupperware container to age in the cheese cave for another month.  I'll turn it over every week (or probably more often because I love looking at them) until then. 

Looks like the sanitation problem has been solved.  I am going to get some StarSan at the brew store in Concord because we are bottling the Chocolate Stout this weekend, and it can do double duty for cheese making sanitation.

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2009, 02:34:40 AM »
More Beer? That place has everything.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline saycheese

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2009, 01:53:42 PM »
Yup, More Beer!  They DO have everything.  I always have to get what I came for and get out quickly before something else grabs me and says take me home.

Offline saycheese

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2009, 06:38:46 PM »
The manchego has developed some slight mold on top and bottom after coating with olive oil.  I removed the mold today with a cloth soaked in brine. Also recoated it with olive oil, changed its tupperware home and cheese mat to fresh clean ones in hopes of avoiding further mold growth.  We'll see how it goes -- the goal is to let this age for a few months and see what flavor develops (hopefully not mold!).

Offline Tea

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Re: Manchego without Lipase
« Reply #14 on: January 22, 2009, 02:43:00 PM »
Damn mould, it can be the bane of our existance at times.  >:(

I found that the oil treatment was great in helping keep surface mould at bay.  It does, for some reason, give a harder rind, but that is OK.  If the mould is just surface and persistant, just thinly slice it off, rub salt into the area, then oil it again.

Hope it continues to age well for you.