Author Topic: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese  (Read 4484 times)

Offline Boofer

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2011, 07:02:17 PM »
I even saw another video where the guy was making cheese in a room that opened onto where he kept the cows... go figure  :o
I think that was a 360 degree panoramic view of the room, right? Agreed, too close for my comfort. Not much room in those chalets though. You do what you gotta do.

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Offline smilingcalico

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2011, 09:53:12 PM »
@Max, not aggressive in the least.
@Tomer, I've tried salting and not salting the beer.  I've not noticed a difference, so I don't salt it anymore.  I understand the logic of salting it, but good, consistent end results tell me there's no need.
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Offline dthelmers

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #17 on: November 24, 2011, 11:05:11 AM »
Here's the Gouda that I soaked in stout for three days. It was five weeks old when I soaked it. The stout imparts a nice flavor to the cheese, and looks quite nice.
Dave in CT

Offline max1

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #18 on: November 24, 2011, 12:02:14 PM »
That looks incredible!  Beautiful color to the rind too!  How was the paste texture?

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2011, 02:13:48 PM »
That looks fantastic!  Well done.  How did the stout turn out?

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Offline dthelmers

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2011, 08:02:51 PM »
The paste was quite typical Gouda in texture, with a good flavor. The milk was local from a friend who keeps a single cow. Without having made two cheeses and comparing the stout soaked to the other one without soaking, I can't say how much difference the stout made, except that I can certainly taste it and it adds complexity to the taste. The stout was my own home brewed with Irish ale yeast. After soaking, I let it sit at room temperature, about 55-60 degrees F for several days, and it developed a whitish powdery texture. Thanks to Smilingcalico for sharing this idea - the cheese was a big success at Thanksgiving today!
Dave in CT

Offline Boofer

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2011, 12:52:35 AM »
Congrats, Dave.

It looks quite tasty.

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Offline smilingcalico

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2011, 07:46:08 PM »
Great to hear, Dave.  I've never eaten one that young.  We always age it two months so the flavors really meld together. Glad to hear of your success!
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Offline dthelmers

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #23 on: November 26, 2011, 09:30:36 AM »
I'll certainly make more this way, and age them out properly. I couldn't resist trying this and serving it at Thanksgiving. Here's a cheese for the inspiration!
Dave in CT

Offline dthelmers

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2012, 02:13:01 PM »
Here's a follow up on this cheese. I vacuum sealed one half and aged it out another 3 months. The flavor developed quite a lot. It was quite sharp and aromatic. I'm not sure how to describe the flavor: sharp like a blue cheese, but with a very different nose. I couldn't decide if I really liked it or not, but a friend who quite enjoys a lot of very aromatic French cheeses was very pleased with it, and I gave him the remainder because he loved it so much. My experience in cheese has been rather limited, I need to explore a bit to see what various cheeses taste like; but all in all I would say that this was a real success, and I'll make some more this spring.
Dave in CT


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Offline Cloversmilker

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #25 on: March 08, 2012, 08:19:04 PM »
Thanks for updating this.  I think that I'll try something along these lines with a Gouda as soon as I have a plain one at 6 to 8 weeks. 

Offline dthelmers

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2012, 10:15:06 PM »
I was inspired to do this by the picture from SmilingCalico earlier in this thread, and she soaks hers the next day. I soaked mine at six weeks because that's how old it was when I saw the picture, and wanted mine to look like that! The next time I make this, I'll soak it as soon as it's dry to the touch, and then age it for two months.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2012, 03:50:21 PM by dthelmers »
Dave in CT

Offline Cloversmilker

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #27 on: March 08, 2012, 10:41:53 PM »
Okay; I have plans for the Gouda I'm making on Saturday.   ;D

This sounds a bit like a cabre al vino with a gouda make.  I am very fond of hard cider; I wonder how soaking in hard cider would turn out. 

Offline smilingcalico

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #28 on: March 08, 2012, 10:58:20 PM »
SmilingCalico is a he, but no offense taken.  I realize calicos are all female, I just happen to like them.  Hmm, hard cider, try it and let us know! 
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Chimay style, Belgian abbey cheese
« Reply #29 on: March 10, 2012, 08:15:16 PM »
OoooOoooo Dave beautiful gouda! That is worth a cheese even if this is not your thread!