Author Topic: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese  (Read 4240 times)

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #60 on: December 19, 2011, 01:29:24 AM »
HI iratherfly,

I'm quite happy with the semi-lactic blue that I made.  And the PC version, with a shift to a colder environment after the mould develops, should prevent the slip skin.  Mind you, the inner paste was very tasty, and the runny bit had a wonderful mushroomy overtone to it that was very nice.  Still, I think with proper temperature controls (i.e. lower) I could prevent the slip skin.  I know these are larger cheeses, about 7 cm across and 6 cm tall (just measured it now, so that's the "well aged size"; this is the blue I've measured as the PC one is long gone).  After all this talking about it I decided to have another taste and it's still very creamy and very nice flavoured.  Not over powering, and no bitterness at all.  In general, I would probably follow this make procedure again with few changes.  I've not included any CaCl2.  I've also only pierced vertically, but one could stick in on the side to increase the viening.  I did generously salt the outside after removing from the mold, so I wonder if that slowed down the blue developement sufficiently to prevent bitterness?  If it's not the mat that giving Tomer1 the problems, the only difference I can think of is either the strain of mould we're using or the form factor.

I'm planning on making another one or two over the holidays.  Will see if they turn out as well again. 

- Jeff
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Online Tomer1

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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #61 on: December 19, 2011, 08:19:48 AM »
Also I didnt salt the outside but rather mixed the salt in which means the outer rind development is much less retarded.   

Gone do another blue batch this weekend.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #62 on: December 19, 2011, 11:04:54 AM »
Hi Tomer1,

Hmmm, I think one other difference is I've used either ripened buttermilk or creme fresche as the starter and you've used a DVI starter.  I wonder if in these small batches if it's just easy to over do the starter amount?  Just thinking off the top of my head here.

- Jeff
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Offline iratherfly

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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #63 on: December 26, 2011, 12:05:54 AM »
Oh, crème fraîche is a fantastic semi lactic starter. It gives the cheese a unique tangy flavor. Most of the French cheeses that have "Delice" in their names are started with crème fraîche and they are utterly delicious.

One more word about slip skin in semi lactics (because I see this happening on several threads here now). I think the thing people overlook about the process of semi lactic is that draining them is nothing like Camemberts, Bries or Tomme. They need to be pre-drained first, then drained in mould for 24-48 hours, salted and then drained out of the mould in cave temperatures for about a week (80-85% RH) before raising moisture to 90%-95% to allowing the rind flora to bloom. This is also what will make a better blue semi lactic.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #64 on: December 26, 2011, 01:17:09 AM »
Hi iratherfly,

Just checking my notes and it was the semi-lactic blue I used the creme fraiche as the starter, the PC versions I've used buttermilk.

When you say "pre-drained", so rather than ladel the curds into the mold, are you suggesting the curds get put in cheese cloth, drained for 30 minutes to an hour?  And then, to basically reiterate what you posted, after that they are moved to the mold with the typical flipping for 24 to 48 hours, then salted (2%-3% by weight), then caved normally (1 week), then high humidity. 

I more or less do much of that except for the "pre-draining" and I can't tell what my cave humidity is.  I was thinking that what I had to do was to wrap and shift to the regular fridge once covered in mold.  The blue didn't have any slip skin, but I don't think slip skin is a problem with that kind of mold.  The one I had with major slip skin was aged at 10 C for a month with no real attempt to avoid it. 

Anyway, what do you recommend as a pre-draining protocol?  (and thanks a lot for the tips).

- Jeff
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Online Tomer1

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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #65 on: December 26, 2011, 12:30:20 PM »
Quote
pre-drained first, then drained in mould for 24-48 hours, salted and then drained out of the mould in cave temperatures for about a week (80-85% RH) before raising moisture to 90%-95% to allowing the rind flora to bloom. This is also what will make a better blue semi lactic

Wouldnt salting 48 hours after draining over acidify the cheese?


Im very concerned about draining blue cheese in the cave for a week in fear of contaminating my other cheeses since I dont have the laxury of a seperate cave for blues.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #66 on: December 26, 2011, 01:34:32 PM »
Hi Tomer1,

I would think with these semi-lactics they have really maxed on the acidity from the long ripening and set time.  I'm not sure they would acidify much more would they?

- Jeff
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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #67 on: December 31, 2011, 02:01:09 PM »
We throw on a small cheese plate tonight with the latest lactics,some very strong gorganzola and some wild rind tomme.

This time there was good flavor,very little to no bitterness and the paste was extremely creamy with no slip skin.
Id call that a success.  I think the geo got out of hand last time.   The moment they had complete bloom coverage I transfared them to the cold fridge for about. this cheese is about 20-25 days old in total.

The tomme has for some reason dried out so it was slightly crumbly but had good flavor and aroma from the rind with some spice to it.  the leftovers will work great on pasta tomorow. :)   
It was a good educational make though.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Jeff's Experimental Lactic PC cheese
« Reply #68 on: December 31, 2011, 02:10:21 PM »
Yah!  That's good to hear.  Out of control geo does lead to bitterness, so it sounds like the shift to cold storage for slower aging is the way to go.  I'm planning on doing exactly that with my 2nd attempt at this semi-lactic pc make, that's now growing mold.  Just waiting for full coverage, and then will wrap and shift to the regular fridge to slow things down. 

We've been nibbling on a caerphilly (about 3-4 weeks old now) and a 1 year old gouda, and the last bits of the semi-lactic blue.  All are quite tasty, so the new year has come in with treats.  Nice!  Happy New Year to you and yours.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.