Author Topic: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?  (Read 2097 times)

Offline zztop

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Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« on: December 07, 2011, 07:59:36 AM »
So a this point I'm really eager to start the cheese making process.  I'm looking to do a series of steps until I eventually I get to something like a Cambozola or stilton.

So I'm looking to do the following:

chevre, ricotta, queso blanco, camembert, Gouda, Gruyere, havarti, and eventually Cheddar


So I want to put in a good size order to Glengarry and my question is if you were to put together a versatile starter kit what would be in it? I'm looking for cultures, 3 or 4 moulds (including a kadova mould), mats and anything else a home cheese  maker will need to go for a long while before he has to order something else.

Regards,
Mike

Offline Boofer

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Re: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2011, 05:54:46 PM »
Hi Mike,

Wow, so late in the day and no one wants to proffer a suggestion?

Eh, what the heck.  :)

I have found that probably 3 molds/moulds will get you through most cheese styles: 7.5" Tomme (with follower/lid), 5" Reblochon (with follower/lid), and 4" Camembert (open bottom). With the Tomme, you can fashion all sorts of semi-hard and hard cheeses using up to 4 gallons milk, including Tomme, Manchego, Swiss, Beaufort, Esrom, etc. With the Reblochon, you can make Reblochon, Camembert, and other thin washed-rind or PC-ripened cheeses. With the Camembert, you can make Camembert, Stilton, and other blues.

As far as cultures go, you can check Glengarry's page and see the different cultures. You need a basic mesophilic and a basic thermophilic. That can be MM100 and/or Aromatic B (or Flora Danica) for a meso. For a thermo, pick TA61. You would also need to add LH (Lactobacillus helveticus) for alpines. You need Penicillium candidum (aka PC) for Camembert for the white rind. It also comes into use for other cheeses as well. I would add Brevibacterium linens, also known simply as linens, BL, or SR3 (one of the strains that I use), to facilitate washed rind development. Finally, I would add Propionibacteria shermanii (aka PS) to develop the flavor and eyes characteristic of Swiss and alpines. If you want to make blues, you will need Penicillium roquerforti (aka PR). There are different varieties of PR. Member Sailor detailed the differences in a thread...search on it.

You also need rennet, either liquid or dry powder. If you will be using only pasteurized/homogenized milk, you will need calcium chloride in solution (aka CACL or CACL2).

There are lots of cultures to go with lots of recipes to go with lots of techniques to go with all manner of milk quality. I'm sure there will be an influx of opinions about which way you should go. I am no expert, but these are some things I have used successfully along my way.

If you desire to make hard cheeses, a Dutch press may be in your future. There are designs on the forum and finished products on Ebay or through members here if you search.

I think if you review the cheeses you want to make in the near future, you can get a clearer idea of what cultures are required. Recipes are available on the forum and in reasonably decent texts such as 200 Easy Homemade Cheeses.

Fine cheesecloth or muslin is used to contain the curd and permit drainage of the whey. Plastic cheesecloth ("Plyban") also works very well and doesn't stick unmercifully to the cheese. A double boiler including a kettle with lid large enough to contain the volume of milk you will be using would be nice. A digital, instant-read thermometer. A pH meter like an ExStik. Ripening containers with grates and grids to allow whey drainage. Recommended not to use bamboo sushi mats as they become breeding grounds for unwanted cultures.

These aren't all available through Glengarry. I just thought I'd mention them. Check the forum for suggestions and ideas as well.

Good luck.  8)

-Boofer-
« Last Edit: December 07, 2011, 06:12:01 PM by Boofer »
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Offline zztop

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Re: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2011, 12:46:43 PM »
Thanks for the response Boofer,

I really appreciate the advice on on the moulds.


As for the cultures I'm just a bit confused.  From the look of it they sell cultures from 2 manufactures (Abiasa and Danisco). I'm guessing people pick the source of the cultures based on certain characteristics they are looking for. Since I'm looking for versatility (and simplicity) at this point I might just buy the gambit of cultures from Abiasa. Once I've made a few cheese I can start "tweaking" with the cultures from Danisco.

I'm going to be order cheese press from Smolt1 and if I need more pressure in the future I'll got bigger.

Regards,
Mike

Offline ellenspn

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Re: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2011, 12:51:29 PM »
Before you go ordering cultures, read this thread http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,6845.0.html

Also think about what your goals are and accept they may change.  I first and still want to make my ideal feta, but I can only eat feta so fast so I'm playing with other cheeses inbetween feta perfection  A)
Ellen Bloomfield
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Offline zztop

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Re: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2011, 12:54:48 PM »
Thanks for the link Ellespn,

This just saved me a lot of time. I'm actually going through a  list of posts for a search of the word Abiasa :)


Regards,
Mike

Offline Boofer

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Re: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2011, 02:27:38 PM »
Before you go ordering cultures, read this thread http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,6845.0.html
Thank you for that, Ellen. I had forgotten it.

I'm actually going through a  list of posts for a search of the word Abiasa :)
Okay...why?

I ask because of my curiosity but also I guess I'm not hung up on a particular culture maker/provider. I attempt to get whatever culture from whatever maker/provider that I believe will help me make the best quality cheese I'm focused on at the moment. Danisco(Choozit), Abiasa, CHR Hansen...whichever offers what I need.

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Offline zztop

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Re: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2011, 02:46:36 PM »
I'm not really hung up on a particular culture provider.  I just looking for a "generic" set of cultures that will allow me to cycle through various types cheese (fresh, semi-hard, hard, mold ripened, etc) to get a feel of the process.  Once thats out of the way I want to go back and tinker with the cultures and procedure to make a better cheese as linuxboy suggests in the post that ellen points out.   

Regards,
Mike

Offline ellenspn

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Re: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2011, 03:10:51 PM »
I ended up choosing as my "basics" MM100, TA 61 and LH (Choozit), Not sure offhand what the other companies equivelents are.  But what you choose will depend on what you want to focus on.  I chose Feta-Mesophilic to start for my feta perfection.
Ellen Bloomfield
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Offline margaretsmall

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Re: Whats in your Glengarry starter kit ?
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2011, 03:34:54 PM »
 Boofer's thoughtful list covers your needs well, I would only add that you might want to hold off ordering the supplies you need for some of the more difficult cheeses, only because all these things deteriorate over time. Maybe focus on a couple of styles of cheese for a while,  to get the process nailed rather than trying to make every style of cheese straight off (tempting though that certainly is!) So many cheeses, so little time....
Margaret