Author Topic: My 3rd Montasio  (Read 1667 times)

Offline JeffHamm

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My 3rd Montasio
« on: November 05, 2011, 06:35:11 PM »
Hi,

Well, I've decided to make another Montasio as my previous two makes, still not sampled, used lipase which was apparently non-functional and I didn't have any LH flavour enhancing culture.  So, having now picked up new lipase and some LH culture, I figured it was all a go.

And, just to ensure I've changed as many variables as possible, I also decided to use my new calf rennet instead the microbial rennet I've been using.  The calf rennet bottle says use 3ml / 10 L, but it didn't list the IMCU for strength.  I normally use 0.6 ml of the 750 IMCU vegetarian rennet to get a floc time in 10-15 minutes.  Using a simple conversion I estimated the calf rennet to be around 175.  I e-mailed the store and asked if they had the IMCU for the calf rennet, and it's 280!  When I then calculated how much rennet I figured I needed to get a similar floc time as I get with the 750 rennet, that worked out to be 1.6 ml, not 3.0 ml.

I went with my calculated amount, and my floc time was 12 min 30 sec!  (could have been 12, as I think I tend to overshoot a wee bit).  Had I used the 3ml for this make, it would have floc'd somewhere around 6 minutes, which is way too fast.  I'm very pleased with myself, but I have to admit, linuxboy had confirmed that my conversion equations should get me in the right ballpark, so a big thanks to you for that confidence booster.

Anyway, we're going to the beach shortly, so after the first 30 min press in the pot I'll flip it, and then just press in the pot at 1.08 PSI until we get back.  Will post some photos when it's out of the press tomorrow.


Montasio: Sunday, Nov, 2011 17  C, sunny, high pressure
10 litres homebrand standard milk (pasteurized)
4 ice cubes thermophillic
1/16-1/th tsp LH
½ tsp 30% CaCl in egg cup of water
¼ tsp calf lipase in egg cup of water
1.6 ml calf rennet IMCU 280
1)   Warm to between 30.5-35.0 (start : 8:55 am; start Temp 7.8 C)
2)   Add lipase (time: 9:10 – temp 35.0 C)
3)   Add CaCl (9:11 temp: 34.9 C) (oops, should have been after ripening)
4)   Add starter (time:9:12 - temp 34.8 C)
5)   Ripen 30 minutes (target Time: 9:45)
6)   Add rennet (target floc 10-15 minutes) (time added: 9:45:00 temp 34.8 C | floc time: 12 m 30 sec )
7)   Use 3x multiplier (wait: 37 m 30 sec; cut time 10:22:30)
8)   Cut to corn kernel size (1/2 cm cubes), heal 10 minutes (start time: 10:27 – 10:37; temp 33.9 C)
9)   Stir and cook curds while raising temp to 47.8-50 C over 45-60 minutes (start: 10:37 @ 34.0 C - reached 48.0 C at 11:20 am)
10)   Let curds settle under whey, gather into large cake and drain (sit 20 minutes: 11:40 am)
11)   After draining curds, break up curds and stir for 15-35 minutes (release whey) (start time: 11:45 end time 12:05)
12)   Move to mold and press (time: 12:12-12:42; 5 kg : pressed in the pot; 0.36 psi)
13)   Flip and redress; press for 1 hour 45 minutes at 15 kg (12:55 – 2:40; 1.08 psi)
14)   Flipped and redressed, move to room @ 20C Increase weight to 35.2 kg (2.53 psi) (2:45)
15)   After 2.5 hours, 5:15 flipped and redressed.  Increased weight to 35.2 kg (2.53 psi for overnight press fantastic knit!)
16)   Removed from press 6:00 am, Nov 18th, weight 1176g. (15.5 cm x 5.0 cm = 1.25 g/cm3)  Best knit yet
17)   Placed in saturated brine at 6:00 am for 8 hours/kg (4 hours/lbs) (removed at 4:35 Pm; 1154g)

Went to the beach for the pressing, so the schedule is not the same as before.

Attached below is the chart showing the heat rise, which I'm pretty pleased with this time.  In the sink works much better than in the double boiler.

And, the 2nd photo shows the cheese just after the 15 kg press (step 13).  The knit is pretty good for this stage, and will definately improve as the weight goes up.  The cheese still feels like it's going to compress and knit, so this is all going to plan.  He says with an undue sense of confidence. :)

And the 3rd photo is the cheese after the all night press and just before going for a salty swim.  1176g, which is exactly the same as my previous make at this stage! Although this one is slightly denser (1.18 g/cm3 last time vs 1.25 g/cm3 this time).  I've increased the pressing weights, so I'm assuming the difference would reflect a reduction in internal mechanical openings in this time.

It's lost a few grams after brining.  It's now 1154g post brine.  And, when I check my notes, the 2nd one I made was also 1154g post brine!  I'm very pleased with the consistency of the yield. 
« Last Edit: November 06, 2011, 10:45:06 PM by JeffHamm »
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2011, 11:34:13 PM »
I've made some riccotta from the whey again.

You know, there are some cheeses that just seem to go well for you.  Montasio, for some reason, just seems to turn out well.  I've just flipped it and it's now ready for it's overnight press, and the knit is fantastic.  Every time I've made this cheese the make has gone smoothly.  It's a quick make (meaning 4 hours or so), and the heat rise seems to go well in my sink by just adding a kettle of boiling water a couple times over the 45 minutes to an hour to get the milk warming up.  But still, the knit on all 3 has been near perfect, they are aging well (no cracks or splits, relatively mold free, etc).  I now have three of these, and I've yet to taste one!  I've never even had the real thing.  I have no idea if I even like this cheese but I seem to be stock piling just in case. 

- Jeff
« Last Edit: November 06, 2011, 01:56:30 AM by JeffHamm »
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2011, 12:16:58 AM »
Hi,

Well, this make went remarkably well.  I'm thinking this will have fewer mechanical openings as the density is higher than the previous make but the weight is the same.  Both of these are slightly lighter than the first make, but I had skiped the "stirr curds post drain" in step 11 the first time, so it may have retained a bit more whey.  Then again, the difference in final weight was 1182 the first time vs 1154 the 2nd and 3rd time, so 28 g.  Could just be between make variation that results from a variety of different things (the milk, for example).  I didn't have an increase in yeild from changing to the calf rennet, but I think the curd might have been a bit firmer.  But that can just be expectations.  I admit I was pleased with myself for figuring out the proper amount of rennet to use based upon the IMCU value and that I had the confidence to use my knowledge to over-ride the manurfacturer's suggested dosage (of course, linuxboy's confirmation that my calculations should work in theory was the primary source of that confidence).  It was also nice to use some new cultures.  I picked up some LH and added that, and also have some fresh lipase.  It will be interesting to see how this one compares with the other two I have aging.  In the thread on my first make, John (CH) posted a picture of Montasio from a Canadian cheese monger and it can be waxed.  In a month or so, I'll probably wax this one so I can age it out for a year or so.  I've got one vac sealed (the first one), and another just aging in the ripening box (the second one).  I might cut into one of those around Christmas / New Years. 

Anyway, this is a very straight forward pressed thermo cheese.  Certainly worth a go to anyone just starting.

- Jeff
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2011, 01:12:00 AM »
Found this interesting article in the journal "Microbiology Letters" exploring the microflora found in montasio during ripening.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1016/S0378-1097(03)00816-4/pdf

- Jeff
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Offline FoxDog Farm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2011, 07:06:12 AM »
Jeff, just wanted to say that your reports on your montasio inspired me to try making the cheese myself.  I've one that's about 6 weeks old aging now.  I gave it an olive oil rind and am really liking the way it's turning out.  I used goat milk, so that's bound to be a taste adventure.  I figure I'll let it get to table cheese ripeness and try it, then perhaps ripen it further.  I should be making another soon.  Thanks for the inspiration!


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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2011, 11:24:39 AM »
Thanks FoxDog Farm,

Goats milk would allow you to skip the lipase as goats milk is naturally high in them.  Would be interested in hearing how yours turns out.  It's not too late to start a thread, and posting a photo to show how your cheese is doing.  Don't forget to at least post your tasting notes, so that others will know how well it turns out.  Anyway, thanks for the vote of confidence.

- Jeff
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Offline Cloversmilker

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2011, 10:18:55 PM »
Montasio is a cheese that has also always worked well for me.  I enjoyed the article.  Certainly justifies making raw milk cheese.   :)

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2011, 11:05:23 PM »
Hi Cloversmilker,

Indeed.  It's interesting, if you have access to raw milk, you could thermise your milk (63 C for 20 minutes) and then grow the thermophilic bacteria by letting it rest for 18-20 hours at 44 C, at which point you then move into the rest of the make (if I understand the opening of the article correctly of course).  This would then give you a more traditional make procedure, but of course, the local microflora might be quite different and the resulting cheese would take on its own unique characteristics. 

- Jeff
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Offline Cloversmilker

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2011, 08:56:32 PM »
It would be interesting though.  I don't typically use lipase either, so that will be something else to try.

I'll put it on the list to try in December after the calf is weaned and the pigs aka milk gluttons go into the freezer.  I'll have at least 20 gallons of milk to convert into cheese each week. 

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2011, 01:21:26 AM »
Hi Cloversmilker,

I think there are some good threads on how to develope your own thermophilic starter cultures.  As I recall, you have to run it through a few generations (so there's more to it than what I listed above).

- Jeff
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2011, 09:09:11 PM »
Hi,

Well, this was made Nov 6th, and today is Dec 10th, so I figure it's time to wax this one and move it into long term storage (i.e. out of the ripening box and onto one of the shelves.  It's now 972g, and still pretty much free of mould.  I'll probably take this out to a year or more, since I've got three of them in total.  At some point I need to make another gouda for long term aging, and I really should make something in the cheddar family as well (maybe even a traditional cheddar!)  I've got a caerphilly which will be ready on Christmas Day, and a Wensleydale that will be 140 days on the 25th as well, and I'm still nibbling on the Lancashire that I made Sept 11th and that's continuing to age well. 

As for another bit from my notes.  The 2nd Montasio I made weighed 1154g out of the brine and 972g when I waxed it.  Those are both exactly the same numbers for this one too!  It also was 1154g out of the brine and 972g on wax day.  And honest, that was not planned.

Anyway, this one won't be seen again for some time. 

- Jeff
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Offline Beans

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2012, 10:00:47 AM »

Hey Jeff,
That knit looks perfect.  My neighbor (cheese mentor) made Montasio a few years back and he loved it.  He aged it 7 months before taking it to work; where it quickly disappeared.  Its now on both of our "to make lists".  Thanks for the blog.
Curt

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2012, 11:52:50 AM »
Thanks Beans!  I think I would cut the lipase down to 1/8 tsp next make, or maybe even 1/16th.  But I'll reserve judgement on that until I've cut into this when it's at least a year old.  We're using the first one, grated over spagetti and it's very good.  The lipase has made it just a bit strong for just cutting a slice and eating; but as it ages it may grow into it's flavour so we'll see.  I've got 3 of these, with the first one being used up, so the others will age out nicely.

- Jeff
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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2012, 12:42:02 PM »
It's sure is nice that if you overdo the lipase on a cheese you can just put it back into your cave and let it harden into a grating cheese! 
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My 3rd Montasio
« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2012, 02:14:21 PM »
Hi anut,

Yah, and I was planning on turning these into a grating cheese in the first place, so being a bit strong is just fine.  I'll probably make one as a table cheese at some point though, and I'll back down on that one.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.