Author Topic: Lamb Prosciutto  (Read 1526 times)

Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Lamb Prosciutto
« on: November 07, 2011, 09:52:13 PM »
I have got the recipe from Matti Kaarts and it turned out real good. I was wishing not to waste a nice lamb butt and it surpassed my expectations.







The tying of the meat can be seen in this video in details.

Next time I will try fenugreek instead of rosemary and try to get pastrami aroma.


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Offline dttorun

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Re: Lamb Prosciutto
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2011, 06:47:53 AM »
I have this recipe for beef pastrami (or basterma as it is called) using fenugreek


Meat:
2 to 3 lbs. boneless beef (from rib section, 1 to 1 1/2 inches thick)
½ cup Kosher salt

For the Paste:
1/4 cup paprika
1/4 cup chaman (ground fenugreek seeds)
1 tablespoon allspice
1 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp black pepper
1 tsp cumin
½ tsp cayenne pepper
3 small cloves garlic, pressed or finely minced

1 cup (or more) cold water

Directions:

Using a fork, pierce the meat all over. This will allow the salt to penetrate. Cut the meat in two equal pieces, then with a large needle, thread a heavy twine or string through one end of each piece of the meat and tie it into a loop. This will be used to hang the meat when curing.

Generously sprinkle each section of meat with Kosher salt on all sides. Lay meat on a pan and refrigerate for 3 days. Turn meat once a day to keep coated with salt.

On the fourth day, remove salt from the meat. Wash meat thoroughly, then soak in cold water for about an hour. Drain and pat meat dry using paper towels, making sure excess moisture is removed.

Create 2 bags out of cheesecloth to hold each section of meat. Place meat in bags, and hang from the loops in a cool dry place** - or the refrigerator - for about 2 weeks.

(**If you hang the meat in a cool dry place rather than the refrigerator, be sure to bring the meat inside if the weather becomes rainy or damp.)

After the 2 weeks are up, combine all of the ingredients for making the paste, stirring in water a little at a time. Stir until a smooth, thin paste is formed. (Note: the paste can be made in advance and kept in the refrigerator until ready to use.)

Remove the meat from the cloth bags, saving them for later use.

Cover the dried meat completely with the paste; let stand for about 2 weeks in a pan. Turn the meat every couple of days to keep covered with the paste. At the end of the second week, remove meat from the paste and return each piece to the cloth bags. Hang outdoors for one more week of drying. Remember, if it’s damp outside, hang the basterma in a cool dry place inside.

After the second drying period, the basterma will be ready to serve.

Offline ellenspn

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Re: Lamb Prosciutto
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2011, 11:56:58 AM »
Both of those look awesome...sigh...don't need another hobby.... :-\
Ellen Bloomfield
Spinning, weaving, geocaching, dog training and now cheesemaking in the Swamps of NE Illinois.

Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Re: Lamb Prosciutto
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2011, 02:48:21 PM »
Ellen, it is not a hobby, this is what we do for survival  ;D
It is necessary when you are surrounded by commercial junk food.  ;)

Tan, thanks very much for the recipe bro. I made pastirma before and used always different recipes. I will try yours after Marianski's recipe.

Offline Tomer1

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Re: Lamb Prosciutto
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2011, 07:10:50 PM »
I assume it wont be very responsible to hang raw meat in my cave along with aging cheeses?

Amatuar winemaker,baker, cook and musician
not in any particular order.


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Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Re: Lamb Prosciutto
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2011, 02:57:34 PM »
Tomer, I have seen it has been done in larger caves but in small scale the bacteria may got into a fight.  :D

Actually, most meat ripening bacteria are lactobacilli and the white mold is Pencillium Nalgiovense which is like P. Candidum and also PC used on salamis as a ripening and protective cover.

If you don't have a space or an extra fridge, you can try putting them in the same fridge.