Author Topic: "Chevre" using cow milk  (Read 3266 times)

Offline vdrko

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"Chevre" using cow milk
« on: November 10, 2011, 07:00:49 PM »
Hi, I'm new to the forum and realm of cheesemaking.  Can you make chevre from cows milk?  If so, should I add some lipase to replicate goat milk? 


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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2011, 07:19:37 PM »
I did that once...only once.  :o  It's not the same, it's goooaty!  Better off making fromage blanc and adding a little lemon juice to give it tang.  :)
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Offline iratherfly

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2011, 02:45:47 PM »
Chèvre by definition is of course the French word for "Goat"....

But if you mean applying the same fabrication technique to cow's milk - of course. It's a lactic or semi lactic technique and it defines an entire class of cow's cheese that has been made for thousands of years, so in that respect -yes. Fromage Blanc, Quark, Cream Cheese, Delice de Cremier, Boursin, Neufchâtel, Chaource, Brie de Melun, Saint Marcellin, Vache de Chalais and Robiola are just a few of the hundreds of cheeses made using this formula as a base for the recipe.  If you intend on not aging it, you should salt it and dry it to desired firmness. It works very well marinated in oil, coated with herbs or spices, wrapped in grape and other leaves, etc. A very casual table cheese if not aged. Easy to make and very satisfying.

Offline vdrko

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2012, 08:39:13 PM »
Thanks for the information.  My goal is make a cheese that has the same consistency and flavor as chevre, but substitute cow's milk for goat's.  Goat milk is hard to find around here and I was hoping to add something to the cow's milk to mimic goat's milk.  However, I will do some homework and read about the cheeses iratherfly has mentioned.  I'm sure at least one of these will be a very suitable alternative.  My plan is to pair whatever cheese I end up making with a slice of fresh tomato, a splash of fine olive oil, some fresh herbs, and a slice of toasted home baked bread.  I can't imagine any cheese failing that test!

Thanks again!   

Offline Tomer1

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2012, 09:34:43 PM »
Obviously cow milk will not taste like goat milk.   Im not sure its a candidate for lipase since even when surface ripened ,it isnt done long enough for the lipase to "kick in" like it does in brined or hard cheeses.
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Offline iratherfly

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2012, 11:50:58 PM »
What do you mean? I mean Lipase won't give cow's milk any goaty flavor in a long shot, but it is used even in short aged cow's milk cheese such as Mozzarella

Offline fied

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2012, 09:59:36 AM »
I often make a "Chevre"-type lactic; when I don't make Chaource, that is. As I like lactic cheeses to be fairly sharp, I ripen the cows' milk for about 20-24 hours, but don't bother to add lipase. I do add some penicillium candidum.

They get eaten about ten days after the make, when the rind has become bloomy.

Offline iratherfly

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2012, 12:21:19 AM »
Sounds like young Crottins or Caprino then!

Offline vdrko

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2012, 10:07:24 AM »
So I made the following cheese which I adapted from FiascoFarms chevre recipe:

1/2 gallon whole cow milk @ 72 F
1/5 drop rennet
2 drops CaCl2

Let sit 24 hours at which time the consistency resembled sour cream and had a layer of whey on top. 

Transfered the curd to molds which I made from recycled 16 ounce sour cream containers with 1/8 inch holes drilled into them.  They have sat and drained for an additional 48 hours, but the consistency is still a bit softer than I would prefer (somewhere between sour cream and cream cheese).  Is there a way to alter the recipe so that the cheese is more firm the next time I make it?  By the way, what is the proper name for this kind of cheese? 

Offline dthelmers

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2012, 10:11:49 AM »
I ladle the curd into a cheese cloth lined colander using a very shallow ladle. After it has drained a bit, I gather up the corners of the bag and let it hang for another 24 hours. If I salt it after draining but before hanging, it seems to expell a bit more whey, but if I wait until after hanging it develops a stronger flavor.
Dave in CT


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Offline jizo63

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2012, 03:41:20 PM »
My first post, in english!
Here, is quite normal makes " caprini" whit cow's milk or mix with goat's milk!
The technology is same:
5Litres milk, at 25°C
3 drops rennet,
1/2 cup of old whey (from cheese of day before or no too old save in fridge)
Draining in clothe and salt in " pasta"( I don't know in english) , mix salt before shaping.
Mau

Offline iratherfly

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Re: "Chevre" using cow milk
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2012, 02:14:11 PM »
Yes Jizo; It's really the same as Crottin/Chèvre, only Caprini are made in an open basket mould and you wait for them to drain naturally. The French version calls for pre-draining in a bag. No need to do that if you have Caprino mould.