Author Topic: Working with Creamline Milk  (Read 605 times)

Offline ellenspn

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Working with Creamline Milk
« on: December 07, 2011, 01:07:47 PM »
When I have been able to get my hands on cow creamline milk I use it.  But I'm not handling the top stirring right or something.  No matter how much I stir, I seem to have clumps of solidified fat and my whey ends up with a layer of fat on top.

I don't think I'm supposed to have that, or am I just used to homoginized milk?
Ellen Bloomfield
Spinning, weaving, geocaching, dog training and now cheesemaking in the Swamps of NE Illinois.


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Working with Creamline Milk
« Reply #1 on: December 07, 2011, 05:27:45 PM »
I too have experienced a layer of milkfat that refuses to be assimilated ("Resistance is futile.") and ends up totally separate from the main body of curd. What to do?

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Offline george (MaryJ)

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Re: Working with Creamline Milk
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2011, 05:47:54 AM »
I have this issue, too, sometimes, most usually with cams and sech that have a high multiplier.  Especially if I'm using somewhat older milk.  All I can do is keep stirring during ripening time (I stir up the top of the pot with the ladle @ 90 degrees to milk surface for a minute or two, THEN draw up and stir around from the bottom - it doesn't seem to work unless I do that "top o' the pot" thing).  With cams, though, I almost always end up with those special little multi-colored curds - on the good side, they seem to work themselves out during the aging process, as I've yet to see the paste on a finished cam look like one of those colby/jack mixes with half-white, half-yellow curds.

Or perhaps the problem is really a secret Borg weapon and there really IS nothing we can do.  (What if the hokey pokey IS what it's all about??)
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Offline Oude Kaas

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Re: Working with Creamline Milk
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2011, 09:16:50 AM »
This is a normal occurrence when coagulating non-homogenized cow milk over a longer period. Because the fat globules have a lower density than the other milk particles, they rise to the top.

One way to try to prevent this is to let the milk acidify to 6.0-6.2pH, stir the cream which has risen to the top into the milk and add the rennet. The time it take now to coagulate the milk might be short enough to prevent the fat globules to rise to the top.

If cream is still on top, try to scoop it up when filling the molds making sure it distributes evenly among the curd. Or, better yet, fill one or two molds with more cream and you will create a triple cream. Yummi...

Offline Boofer

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Re: Working with Creamline Milk
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2011, 01:59:10 PM »
(What if the hokey pokey IS what it's all about??)
;D By jove, I think she's got it!  ;D

Yeah, that's what I needed. Got a little smile goin' here. Thanks for that, MaryJ.

If cream is still on top, try to scoop it up when filling the molds making sure it distributes evenly among the curd.
That's what I eventually attempted to do...spread the wealth of milkfat around. I think it worked out okay.

It would seem like a semi-lactic that sits around for hours waiting to gel would exhibit the separation without a chance for corrective action. A renneted cheese would be more conducive to assimilation because the gelling occurs more rapidly.

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