Author Topic: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase  (Read 1472 times)

Offline george13

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use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« on: December 22, 2011, 04:34:10 AM »
I tried my hand in attempting a Reblochon the other day, and in following a given procedure, I included both PC and b-linnen strains during the initial innoculation process.  Should I also include the b-linnen in my wash or just relly on the amount added already.  Will there be an indication that the first addition has taken? Thanks


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Offline elkato

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2011, 08:52:36 AM »
I would also add it to the wash, mine took forever (1 month) before they showed any sign of linnens so be patient  and follow Iratherfly's instructions on how to do the washing, rubbing thing, (I didn't use PC but rather Geo)

Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2011, 08:40:53 PM »
I never add anything to my wash solution; always add the B. linens to the milk. I've never had it not appear after washing. This is such a good cheese. Hope it turns out well.
Pam

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2011, 10:03:07 PM »
I've had b.linens show up within the first week when I've added it to the milk.  Mind you, I've also had them show up without having added them at any stage.  Just look for orange/red patches showing up, as if your cheese is getting a bit of a rash.

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Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #4 on: December 23, 2011, 02:39:25 AM »
You need to get the surface conditions right for growing blinens (pH and nutrients).  Adding PC and allowing it to fluff up is a good way to do this.  After it starts growing you can keep knocking it down every day with a blinen dosed wash.


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Offline george13

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2011, 03:19:28 AM »
Thanks to all for the info. 

Offline george13

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2012, 03:22:11 PM »
Francois,  in my second attempt at a Reblochon, I used PLA LYO from Danisco (which contains: B. linens, Arthrobacter nicotianae, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Geo. Candidum.)  Not knowing this composition at the time of use, I also added a pinch of Geo and B. linens on top of that, now I am getting a bright yellow almost fluorescent coloration.  Do you think I used too much B.linens?  Another member told me that the yellow will eventually go away, I was curious in knowing what the science behind it is, or what reaction causes the yellow color.
Thanks

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2012, 07:40:21 PM »
Any chance you can post a picture?  You can't really add too much b. linen but you can easily add too much geo.  Give it the right conditions and you'll get a thick geo skin with no b linen growth.  That sort of sounds like what you have, with a little pseudomonis mixed in.

Offline george13

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2012, 05:52:18 AM »
I tried to get a better color capture, but could not.  the cheese in the back (its side) has a good depiction of the color, it is a very bright yellow.  The one on the left is not too bad. 

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #9 on: March 02, 2012, 06:02:08 AM »
Those look fine.  The yellow is a mix of geo and b linens working together and it does go away over time as the b linens slowly work to the front.  What you do next depends on how you want the final cheese to be.  I personally don't care for excessive geo, even on a reblochon.  I'd give those cheeses a good final wash, slight dry, then wrap them and put them in a refrigerator.  The lower temps will allow the b linens to grow and retard the geo to some degree.


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Offline george13

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2012, 09:59:46 AM »
Thank you very much Francois, my cheese is in week 5, I will follow your advice.  How long wraped and in cooler temperature (how cool would you recomend) before it may be ready to eat?  Thanks

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2012, 07:01:33 PM »
I usually wrap these in week 3, put at 4C and keep for another 2 weeks minimum before sale.

Offline george13

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2012, 06:46:33 AM »
Francois, I tasted the Reblochon today and it was spectacular. Unfortunately, the rind is still very ugly on some of them with the fluorescent yellow coloration remaining, almost as if nothing wants to grow on them.  I am now thinking back and wondering if I perhaps added too much stuff into my make, and not the right things.

Here is the list:
CaCl2
MM100
Geo 13
PLA LYO
B. linens
Flora Danica
TA61
I did not use any PC
I did notice that after placing in moulds it was a bit holey, so perhaps too much gas was developed.
I made this cheese January 29.
I will enjoy the cheese regardless of appearance, I just want to make sure next time, I capture the complete and true essence of a Reblochon.   Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2012, 01:26:27 AM »
MM100 and FD are virtually identical cultures, you'd use one or the other.  My preference is MM100 unless you are making mother culture, then FD has a better in flavour.  There's no real reason for this, I've just noticed it in application.

I'd have used geo 15 as well, not sure exactly what strain is in PLA, we don't use it here.  Otherwise I think you're fine.  With discoloration and a static rind I would guess you didn't drain enough and perhaps the aging enviroment was too humid.  The ripening cascade for this cheese should be geo giving way to yeasts. 

From the photos they look good, just a bit too much geo 13 growth and not quite enough yeast, but they still look quite nice.

Offline george13

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Re: use of b-linnens during innoculation phase
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2012, 02:11:41 PM »
Thank you very much Francois, very encouraging news.  I appreciate your indepth knowledge, presumably you are somehow involved in the cheese business, and everything you offer on this board is great advice.  I am practicing many French cheeses, as they are my passion.  I am also considering a small micro dairy business in upstate NY, where I can perhaps master these cheeses.  Thanks again