Author Topic: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker  (Read 2237 times)

Offline terrie

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terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« on: January 28, 2009, 03:56:22 PM »
Thanks for the response to the smoked gouda post.   I liked the simplicity of the can and soldering iron method, but didn't have a new iron.  Wouldn't you know we're iced in here in parts of Ok. and so I couldn't get out.  I decided to try a woodburning tool that I had.  I think it worked about the same.  I put my hickory chips in foil and layed the burner in the middle.  Put my cheese on a rack and turned a very large stainless salad bowl over everything.  Since it was so cold outside I did this in the house.  Kept almost all of the smoke smell in the bowl by covering it with a large towel.  The gouda looks and smells great. 


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Offline chilipepper

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2009, 05:47:49 PM »
That sounds great Terrie.  How long did you end up smoking it?  Was it producing pretty heavy smoke or more of a smolder??

Offline Likesspace

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2009, 06:25:43 PM »
Terrie..
I'm also really curious as to how long you smoked it and how thick of a smoke you got.
I got a little carried away with a wedge of farmhouse cheddar and ended up leaving it in a thick smoke for two hours.
Needless to say it has a VERY strong smoke flavor and I'm letting it mellow in the fridge.
From everything that I've read, the smoke flavor will get less and less the longer it sits.
I can say that the Gouda I did first, turned out perfectly, after letting it mellow for about 6 days.
I also picked up a jar of (adler? alder?) chips in hopes that they are not quite as strong as hickory. I would also like to find some cherry if possible.
I find that hickory can be overpowering when used as a smoking wood, but everyone's taste is different.
Thanks for the update.

Dave

Offline terrie

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2009, 07:48:49 AM »
I smoked it for about 2 hours.  The smoke wasn't too heavy and didn't discolor the cheese a lot.  Just a nice light amber.  I think I will wax it after it dries a bit to keep the flavor in .  What do you think?

Offline valereee

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2009, 08:05:24 AM »
Terrie, very interesting!  You could probably put it into any heavy lidded pan, too.  Although I'd still be tempted to set it out in the garage or something to help keep it nice and cold -- my biggest concern is letting the cheese get too warm. 


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Offline Brian

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2009, 03:04:26 PM »
Hickory and Mesquite is good for smoking meat.  Fruit woods good for chicken and fish.
I'm going to have to guess and go with the fruit woods for cheese.

Yes, smoking meat yet ANOTHER hobby of mine.

Brian

Offline terrie

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2009, 03:08:28 PM »
Yeah, we do quite a bit of smoking too...meats, cabbage, onions, peppers, mushrooms and whatever else I think will taste good.  We usually use pecan for most things and add a little hickory or fruit wood.  It seems like 100% hickory makes things a little bitter.  I think I will use apple for my next cheese and maybe throw some kind of herb on the coals.

Offline Likesspace

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2009, 07:05:11 PM »
Well after nearly a month of "mellowing" my farmhouse cheddar is really quite good.
As posted above, I used straight hickory and let it sit in the smoke for two hours.
The flavor was way too smokey for my taste but now it is just pretty much perfect.
I need to try this again with some of the adler chips I bought.
Also, I think I'll cut the time in half to see if the flavor is more agreeable to my taste buds.
This simple can/soldering iron method really does work well and I would recommend it to anyone that likes a smoke flavored cheese.
Btw...it also works really well with Salmon.

Dave

Offline Captain Caprine

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2009, 10:54:47 PM »
Hi Dave,
I agree with Brian on the fruit wood.  You may want to mellow it out with some apple.  I used to smoke a lot of salmon before the feds screwed us out of our season through gross mismanagement.  I would start with hickory and then follow up with an apple and alder mix.
CC
Just once...
I want to make cheese with no border collie hair in it!!!

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: terrie's Simple Cheese Smoker
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2009, 06:56:22 PM »
Brian and Terrie - As you've probably figured out Smoking and making sausage is my biggest hobby. I have a pretty extensive website and forum on the subject and some really great folks that hang there.

http://www.deejayssmokepit.net

http://www.deejayssmokepitforums.net

For cold smoking a few charcoal briquettes will work also just be aware that each briquette is about 10 degrees. A coffee can with holes punched around it and alternating chunks of charcoal and wood chips/chunks will make a good smoke for cold smoking cheeses, bacons and hams.


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