Author Topic: My first Derby based upon my own recipe  (Read 1948 times)

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2012, 06:03:11 PM »
I had a cheese get too dry and crack.  I made sure the wax flowed into the crack and it aged nicely with no problems.

I haven't aged any cheeses with a natural rind yet.  Do they keep losing moisture after they have been oiled?
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2012, 12:01:04 AM »
They do, but the rate slows down.  I made a romano last march, and it's still natural rind (and clean as a whistle; never any problem).  Out of the press it was just over 1600g, by June it was around 1270, and I just popped it on the scale today and it's between 1100 and 1200 (I forgot to write it down).  So it's still losing some, but only about 100g and a bit since last June.

- Jeff
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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2012, 03:48:02 PM »
I have been trying to avoid natural rinds but I would think you could not get the density needed for a grating cheese when you wax it.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2012, 05:03:38 PM »
The only reason I wax them is because my ripening boxes only hold 2 cheeses each, and I can only fit 1 box per shelf in the fridge.  When I wax the cheese, and it doesn't have to go in a box, I can get 8 cheeses on the shelf.  So it's better use of my cave space.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2012, 06:19:52 PM »
Hi Jeff,

Same thought here!  Maxmizing space, but hopefully not at the expense of some cheeses later down the line.  I have mine carefully worked out so I've saved just enough room for containers to run blue, bloomy and washed rind cheeses, and so I can run two natural rind cheeses without any pentalty in space. I should be able to get close to 100 lbs of cheese into my 5 cubic feet cheese cave.  The nicest thing about winter is I can spill some projects over into an unheated room in the house.

I haven't been tracking the weights as you do, but it seems like most the weight is lost in the first 2-3 weeks, so after that waxing shouldn't be a problem.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #20 on: March 22, 2013, 06:41:13 PM »
Hi,

Ok, Made this over a year ago.  Just removed it from the wax, and it now weighs 956g.  The label is from when it went into the wax, so it's dropped a few grams over that period.  It's had one small piece removed over the year as mould was developing under the wax, which would account for a gram or two.  Anyway, there's a bit of pink colouration on the top, but generally it is in good shape.  It has the typical "fruity" smell of a cheese that has been sealed in wax for a long period.  That will fade after it's air out for a few days.  No taste report yet as I find that it's best to wait for the fruity smell to dissipate before trying it.  Will update once we try it.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline High Altitude

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #21 on: March 23, 2013, 10:29:24 AM »
Cannot WAIT to hear how this one turned out taste-wise, Jeff  ;D!  If you love it, I'll give you a cheese  ;)!
Have some (homemade) wine with that cheese!

Offline BobE102330

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #22 on: March 23, 2013, 12:31:11 PM »
Aww, heck.  I'll give Jeff a cheese just for having the patience to leave the cheese in the cave for a year.  The oldest I have in my cave was made mid December 2012. 

Offline MrsKK

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2013, 07:58:58 AM »
I love your adventurous spirit, Jeff Hamm!

Offline bbracken677

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2013, 08:16:33 AM »
We await the results with bated breath! 

And agreed BobE....tis tough to let them sit in there, all alone for that long.  I think I have a cheddar from Oct, and a Cheshire from Nov or Dec, and of course I still have one Parmesan from last year.  I know the cheshire will not make it a year...perhaps the cheddar but for sure the parm will make it a year. I have a few more in the cave, perhaps another cheddar from last year and a few from January. So I better get busy and make some more!  MOAR CHEESE!!   >:D


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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2013, 02:18:02 PM »
Well, had a piece this am, and this has turned out wonderfully!  Very nice flavour, and the texture is perfect.  A bit crumbly, but not dry and hard although firm when cutting it.  I've got a photo of the cut cheese to post later when I get it off the camera.  But basically, this is definitely worth repeating.  Certainly a good cheese to age out, but can't speak for how it would be at 4 - 6 months.  I'm very pleased.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #26 on: March 25, 2013, 12:21:51 PM »
Hi,

Here's the shot of the cut cheese. 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline High Altitude

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2013, 12:01:43 PM »
Jeff, that is really a sight to behold....a well-deserved cheese for you!  Thanks again for sharing the experience  :D!
Have some (homemade) wine with that cheese!

Offline Rizzo

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #28 on: May 08, 2014, 10:05:19 PM »
Hello Jeff

I have just made a Derby today, and put it in the press afew minutes ago.  I notice there is quite a difference in pressing weights between Mrs KK's and yours...Mrs KK, 5kg/1hour, 5 kg/1 hour, 25 kg overnight, yours virtually double.  Is there a reason behind this (I am making 1/2 measures; i.e. 8 litres milk. thanks
« Last Edit: May 08, 2014, 10:10:46 PM by Rizzo »

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: My first Derby based upon my own recipe
« Reply #29 on: May 09, 2014, 12:45:44 AM »
Hi Rizzo,

The make I've posted is one I've put together based upon some old books, etc.  It involves pressing and re-milling the curds a few times, and this results in the curds getting cooler.  The increased pressing weights are to try and ensure a good knit. In fact, my next make of this will increase the weight a bit more.  Also, it's not weight itself that is important, but pressure per square inch, so bigger moulds require more weight to get the same PSI.  Check out library/software board.  I've got an excel workbook there called "cheesetools" and it will help calculate PSI.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.