Author Topic: Parmesan Virgin  (Read 1258 times)

Offline Wayne Harris

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  • Wayne Harris
Parmesan Virgin
« on: January 29, 2009, 05:05:56 AM »
It looks like Parmesan is next on the cheese docket.

I have never made this and have some rather basic questions.

1> How much milk is required for a 5lb yield?
2> When recipes refer to skim milk of no more than 2.5%, does that mean 2% milk will do?  or do I use skim and add cream?

Thanks.

Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas


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Offline Likesspace

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Re: Parmesan Virgin
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2009, 11:24:35 AM »
Wayne,
I'm also interested in the answer to your questions.
I plan on doing to parmesan's this weekend.
I've only attempted it one other time and it was a total failure.
I'm pretty sure this was due to the fact that when I read that parmesan is made form skim milk, that's exactly what I used....not 2%, not even 1% but actual skim. Needless to say it was pitched since there was no way it would ever come out of it.

Dave

Offline chilipepper

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Re: Parmesan Virgin
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2009, 12:15:17 PM »
Well my recent experience with Parmesan takes me off the virgin list but that is about all I can claim for knowledge other than what I've read.

Most of the reading I've done does refer to skim milk but when you read the information from the actual Italian cheesemakers they also refer to a blend of whole and 'skimmed' milk.  What I've gathered seems to allude to the fact that they are taking the previous nights milk and letting it sit overnight, thus allowing the cream to separate naturally.  They then 'skim' this cream off and blend it 1:1 with the whole milk from the mornings milking and use this blend for their base. 

However to accurately replicate this with store bought milk would be a little more complicated as we really don't have data on the fat content of their skimmed milk.  My theory is that it would not come in anywhere near the store bought version of skim milk. Maybe even closer to 2% than anything.   My own experience with drinking raw 'skimmed' milk would compare the texture, taste and mouth feel to that of 2%.  Of course this is not very scientific at all.

I guess if I were to try it again with store bought milk I would go for 1:1 ratio with 2% and Whole.

As for making a batch to yield 5 lb this is an incredibly dense cheese and you will still get somewhere close to 1lb/gallon but the size will be more along the lines of a 2-3 lb Cheddar for instance.  With mine I ended up with about 3.5 gallons of milk into the kettle after skimming the cream off of two of them and had my large mold all ready to go.  When I drained the whey there was very little curd at the bottom of the kettle.  I resorted to my 4 inch mold and filled it just about full and produced a 46.6 oz cheese.

Once again these are just my observations from my recent attempt and by no means do I have enough experience to call this more than just my experience.  Hope it help though and really look forward to your results!  Good luck both of you.

BTW, the little grains of rice sized curds after they are cooked are really good eats!

Offline Tea

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Re: Parmesan Virgin
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2009, 02:20:14 PM »
John has done a page here for the newbe's I think, that has the approximate yeild of different cheese.  Having said that for a parm/romano the yield is between 7.5 - 8.5% according to my book.

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Parmesan Virgin
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2009, 07:02:31 PM »
Thanks Tea, this Newbie Sticky Post has cheese yields as advised by Tea from her books (credit to Tracey).


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Offline Likesspace

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Re: Parmesan Virgin
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2009, 08:31:32 PM »
John/Tea....
Thanks for the information.
Looks like I'm going to be doing a 5 gallon batch of parmesan so that my mold will be full enough.
Sheesh, I really hate doing 5 gallon batches since my cheese pot is completely full with that amount.
Oh well, it looks like a challenge is ahead of me. Pretty much a perfect way to spend a Saturday morning.
Thanks again.
Dave

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Parmesan Virgin
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2009, 01:54:55 AM »
Let's see what advice can I give, well if you make a brick then my Brick will have a brother.

All I've ever used is 2%. I don't bother with blending, but that's not to say I won't try it. I do press to 20 pounds, use my chart to find the correct psi for a larger wheel.

For a 5 lbs. wheel I'd use 7 gallons of milk, that's what I had in my notes after making a 5 gallons wheel that was 8" diameter and 3" high.

I could actually give useful advice but me brain hurt, been a long day.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Brian

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Re: Parmesan Virgin
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2009, 11:05:50 AM »
Where is this chart you speak of?  I hear it's here somewhere but an initial search resulted in nothing for me.

Thanks

Brian

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Parmesan Virgin
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2009, 11:18:48 AM »
Don't know, but here it is again.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.