Author Topic: Lancashire question  (Read 1335 times)

Offline rattman

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Lancashire question
« on: January 25, 2012, 05:00:54 PM »
200 easy recipes says that lancashire does not age well and is a good young aged cheese.

Mine has bee aging in the cooler for nearly a month.

Do I want to vac seal it at all or do I need to eat it while it is young?

If longer means better.... I'd prefer to wait until it's done.

Thanks all!

Specifis below (I know... a lot is missing):
Cheese Name   Lancashire (200 Easy Recipee book)         
Date   1/3/2012         
            
Ingredients   Qty         
Whole Milk   14qt         
1% Milk   2qt         
Culture   1/2 MA011   Meso      
calcium chloride   1/2 tsp         
rennet   1/2 tsp         

Procedure   Step Time   Total Time   Temp   Ph
            6.8
Heat Milk to 88         88   6.7
Add Culture            6.6
Let Culture Ripen 45 minutes            6.6
Add Calcium Chloride            6.5
Add Rennet            6.5
Let Rennet set 50 minutes            
Cutting Curd            
Pressed @ 6 lbs peg b for 1 hrs            
Pressed @ 33 lbs peg b for 6 hrs            
In cave 80% RH 1-3-11 (1 month)            

I'm using a dutch press by the way if you are wondering about weights.


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Offline smilingcalico

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2012, 12:13:08 AM »
Hello Rattman,  I think you'll find most aged cheeses aren't worth a hoot before a minimum of 2 months.  Lancashire is very good at 60 days.  I bandaged and buttered mine, but I think it would have aged ok without.  I'm not a fan of vac sealing for ageing, just preserving cut aged pieces, so I'm not the person to ask about wether to vac or not.   Also, flavorwise, Lancashire can benefit from the addition of a bit of thermo culture. 
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Offline rattman

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2012, 04:02:15 PM »
Thermo? Really? I have seen recipes with both meso and thermo and was wondering why they would have both in the same cheese?

Offline Cloversmilker

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2012, 09:08:28 PM »
I'm just figuring this stuff out, but here's my rough understanding. This glosses over a lot of nuances but here goes.  The meso and the thermo cultures work at different temps initially, but also on different time scales.  They both initially develop acidity in the milk, but act differently in the cheese during aging.  So a cheddar with a bit of themo added will develop differently in its aging than a plain meso cheddar. 

 

Offline smilingcalico

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2012, 12:08:45 AM »
Pretty well said, Clover.  The thermo will help develop flavor a bit quicker.
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Offline MrsKK

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2012, 09:39:42 AM »
Hey, Rattman, I have found that Lancashire is best anywhere from 60-90 days.  That said, I can't always eat it all in the 30 day time frame, so I have started vacuum sealing what I'm not going to eat right away and put it in my regular refrigerator to extend it's life.  We just ate a hunk of it that was over 3 months old - very sharp and nicely creamy textured, it was very, very good.

Offline rattman

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2012, 04:17:32 PM »
MrsKK,

Did you ever vac seal the lancashire before eating it the first time?

If not ... what RH are you aging it at?

Tupperware in my cave gets me up to about 78% with little rind develompent but plenty of exxternal mold development.

Thanks.

Grew up going to Hayward IL every year and still do.
Are you near there?

regards,
John

Offline MrsKK

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2012, 07:31:53 AM »
No, I taste my cheese before vac sealing it.  But I also make cheese in 5 gallon (roughly 5 lb) batches, so I want to break them down into what we can eat reasonably in a short period of time.

I don't have a hygrometer in my cave or the ripening box, so I'm not sure of what the RH is.  However, the cave (mini fridge) gets some moisture buildup on the back wall where the refrigeran runs through, so I'm guessing it's pretty high.  If I leave a cheese in the ripening container for more than a couple of weeks with the lid completely on, I do get mold issues. 

then I have to take the cheese out, clean it up, clean up the container and put it back in the cave, but I leave the lid skewed so that it is only about 3/4 covered.  That seems to slow down the mold so that I only have to clean it off about every two weeks.

Nowhere near IL - we live about an hour from Minneapolis/St Paul, MN in west-central Wisconsin.

Offline rattman

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2012, 02:41:58 AM »
My typo Mrs. KK
.......... I grew up going to Hayward WI... not IL.

Still go fishing at my dads cabin every year. :)

Must be wonderful living there!

Offline MrsKK

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #9 on: February 19, 2012, 08:18:56 AM »
We live just north of Menomonie, WI.  Do you take Highway 25 when you travel to Hayward?  Hayward is a couple of hours north of here, mostly on back roads.  If you pass anywhere near Menomonie, you'll have to stop in on your way north.  Just pm me!


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Offline kookookachoo

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Re: Lancashire question
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2012, 10:43:48 AM »
Rattman, I've made Lancashire a few times.  Apart from Caerphilly, this is also a house favorite.  :D  I've only had mine turn "crumbly" once.  Really super dry, like when I cut it, I couldn't even get a decent-sized piece without it falling apart. Blah.  It was still good, fortunately, just not the creaminess it's been of the other makes.  That being said, my other Lancashires have been a little hard on the outer part, like about less than an 8th from the rind, but the insides themselves have been really nice & creamy. 

I'm making another batch today, too.  One cheese a day for the next 10 days.  Making really good use of my off time! :D
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