Author Topic: Milk types, yields and cost.  (Read 3345 times)

Offline Cheesemkr

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Posts: 90
  • Cheeses: 3
  • Default personal text
Milk types, yields and cost.
« on: February 13, 2012, 09:51:02 PM »
Hello all,

I have found a dairy about an hour away that will supply me raw cow's milk at $4.00 per gallon 4% butter fat, unfortunately she doesn't have any goats.  However, there is a farm within 10 minutes of my house that will sell me raw goats milk, but there is a $25.00 annual membership fee and they want $10.00 per gallon for goat's milk.  The price seemed high to me, but I have know knowledge of goat's milk cost, I was just comparing it to what I pay for cow's milk.  The question I have is how much should goat's milk cost me and how much cheese can be made per gallon.  Also, based on my memory which is sometimes suspect, I thought I read that goat's milk can be frozen for later use and that it is naturally homogenized, is this true?

Thanks for all of your help,

Andy


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline zenith1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Wallkill, New York
  • Posts: 801
  • Cheeses: 25
  • "Blessed are the Cheesemakers"-Monty Python
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2012, 08:56:53 AM »
Hi Andy- I don't know what geographic area you hail from, but regarding cost $ 4/gallon for fresh cow's milk in my area of NY is in the ballpark-the $10/gallon for the goat milk might be a little high in this area. I know that we have several members who run goat farms, maybe they can shed some light on pricing. While I know that pricing to some extent has to drive our purchase choices, when it comes to cheesemaking the quality and type of cheese that you are making has to be at the forefront IMHO. By that I mean the type of cheese that you are trying to reproduce will dictate what type of milk that you use(cow/sheep/goat). But what ever type that you choose to use it is always best to use the freshest highest quality that you can get your hands on. In your case,like I do, you have the advantage of having a source of fresh raw milk close to home. So to your question about yields I think it firstly has to do with what type you are making, then if it is for instance a cow based recipe, then you can worry about about what breed the milk is from versus yield. In the case of home cheese making the yield is not a very big concern-of course in my opinion. But to your question about yields for hard cheese making:
goat ~10-12%
cow ~ 10-12%
sheep~18-20%
 There is a small variation in yields based on the breed based on the as you know the % of fat in the milk-but from a purely yield stance it probably is not a big concern for the little guy. The type of cheese you are making will ultimately be a bigger determinate to your final yield of curd mass. That said, the percentage of fat will definitely affect the final product in terms of flavor and mouth feel when comparing the same cheese.
Keith

Offline John (CH)

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Katy, Houston, Texas, USA
  • Posts: 4,069
  • Cheeses: 60
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2012, 05:13:48 PM »
Andy, to add to Zenith's reply, some info on cheese yield is available in our Wiki: Milk Yield.

Offline steffb503

  • Catskill Mts, NY State, USA
  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 493
  • Cheeses: 9
    • M & S Farm
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2012, 05:14:07 AM »
Hi
I sell legal raw goat milk in NY. I charge $9 a gallon so I guess the $10 is not so far off.
I think the difference in price between cow and goat has to do with the fact that
1. Not as many folks want the raw goat milk, smaller market
2. Cow milk can easily be sold to the processor in large quantities and the farm can also sell off some raw out of his tank.
3. It might be less expensive  feed to milk for cows. Most goats can not be put out on grass for months at a time and still give you large amounts of milk.

It actually cost me $5 to produce 1 gallon of goat milk. 

Offline Cloversmilker

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
  • Posts: 253
  • Cheeses: 16
  • Default personal text
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2012, 10:49:05 AM »
Even with milk from a single animal, yield will vary depending on time of year, type of feed, and stage of lactation.  Try both the cow milk and the goat milk in the cheeses you want to make, and go from there.  You'll figure out which you like, and which cheese you enjoy making.  You can also mix cow and goat in chevre, etc. to have the goat milk flavor at less expense.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline zenith1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Wallkill, New York
  • Posts: 801
  • Cheeses: 25
  • "Blessed are the Cheesemakers"-Monty Python
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2012, 11:51:16 AM »
absolutely correct. I agree 100%. And if you look at the prices of artisan cheeses at the market you will see that they sell,at least in my area, around $20/lb. So add with that added to the equation, along with your control of the raw products(raw milk) that is going into your personal cheese, I think the minor cost difference is cast in a different light.
Keith

Offline SarahV63

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Finger Lakes Region, NY, USA
  • Posts: 34
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2012, 09:51:39 AM »
WOW! That seems awfully expensive! I $1.50 a gallon for fresh cow's milk. It is from a local farmer without a license but they test for bacteria every time the milk man comes I believe. I know this isn't helpful but maybe you should look around some more. I just stopped at several farms until I got to talking to one farmer and he agreed to do it. It did turn out I knew his brother which sealed the deal.

Good luck!
Apple pie without cheese is like a kiss without a squeeze...

Offline Caseus

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Texas
  • Posts: 227
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Cheese is good
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2012, 04:06:36 PM »
I buy low temperature pasteurized non-homogenized Jersey cow's milk from a farm that delivers directly to homes or to community collective drop off points (usually someone's home).  I pay $7 per gallon.  The exact same milk from the same farm would cost me a bit more than $11 a gallon at Whole Foods.  Part of the cost difference is that Whole Foods only sells it in pints. 

I have not found any other source for non-homogenzied milk, raw or pasteurized, in my area.  Raw milk in my area is difficult to source, as it must be purchased at the farm, and the few farms who are licensed to sell it require guaranteed minimum weekly purchase commitments and they normally have long waiting lists to get on their program. 

I haven't made a serious search for goat's milk yet, but all of it that I've seen in grocery stores has been ultra-pasteurized.

Offline DeejayDebi

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Posts: 5,804
  • Cheeses: 95
    • Deejays Smoke Pit and DSP Forums
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2012, 09:56:26 PM »
I pay $6/gallon for local raw cows milk. Goats milk is $12/gallon I don't buy it.

Offline steffb503

  • Catskill Mts, NY State, USA
  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 493
  • Cheeses: 9
    • M & S Farm
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2012, 04:14:54 AM »
Hey Deb, anytime you want to come out to beautiful Sullivan county I can hook you up with some really good goat milk. It's not too far.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Chris_Abrahamson

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Colorado
  • Posts: 57
  • Cheeses: 1
  • Default personal text
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2012, 09:39:05 AM »
I have a "goat share" arrangement here in Colorado.  I pay $10 per gallon which is average for the various providers in my area.   Added benefit is access to chickens and eggs.  And the pure joy of being around goats every weekend.

Offline DeejayDebi

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Connecticut
  • Posts: 5,804
  • Cheeses: 95
    • Deejays Smoke Pit and DSP Forums
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2012, 10:31:35 PM »
I'd love to meet you SteFF but that's a long drive for milk! Might work on it passing through sometimes though. Maybe I could ice it in a cooler or something.

Offline Spellogue

  • Michael
  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Ohio
  • Posts: 303
  • Cheeses: 14
  • Default personal text
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2012, 08:13:04 PM »
I know this is an old thread but I just found it an thought I would make a note.  You asked about freezing goats milk.  I raise goats so we have a regular supply of goat milk.  I have little incentive to freeze it for later consumption so I don't speak from experience, but everything I've read is that the quality of cheese made from frozen goat or cows milk will be compromised.  I have however made good cheeses from sheeps milk that I stashed in the freezer for 6 months.  I think the higher milk solid content of ewe's milk may have something to do with it.

Funny thing though, it is recommended that you first freeze goats milk when using it to make goat milk soap.  I don't know why.  I do have a few gallons of goat milk in the freezer awaiting soap making but haven't gotten around to it.  I suppose I'd rather be a bit ripe while feasting fine rustic cheeses than sparkling fresh and starving for culture. 
I can resist anything but temptation.      ~ Oscar Wilde

Offline MrsKK

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Wisconsin
  • Posts: 1,872
  • Cheeses: 61
  • Default personal text
Re: Milk types, yields and cost.
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2012, 04:02:37 PM »
The recommendation of freezing milk for soap making is to help keep the milk from burning when you blend it with the lye.