Author Topic: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods  (Read 1302 times)

Offline jbrun85

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Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« on: February 16, 2012, 01:59:13 PM »
Hey guys,

I have a question and I can't seem to find it addressed anywhere on the forums. It's probably there, but buried where I dont expect it.

Basically, I work for a summer camp and this means that for a 2 month period each year, I live away 3 hours away from home. I am fairly new to the cheese making process but I love it and am planning on making quite a few cheeses in the coming months. (I have a lot more time now that football season is over!)

In an ideal world, I'd love to make the cheeses, go away to camp this summer, not think about them and allow them to just hang out and age. I am currently only making pressed cheeses (2lb wheels) that I cover in wax (cheddar, colby, etc.) I'm not entirely concerned about the humidity level due to the wax, but I am concerned about flipping the cheeses.

Will not being flipped for such a long period cause problems for the cheeses upon my return? Do I really need to pack up the whole operation and bring it with me?


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Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2012, 04:33:02 PM »
Can you get a neighbour to turn them?

Offline Tomer1

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2012, 05:42:22 PM »
Many commercial plants dont turn their cheese blocks at all.
I think you'l be fine.
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Offline zenith1

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2012, 06:41:19 PM »
and you have to watch out for CPS(cheese protective services)....
Keith

Offline Gürkan Yeniçeri

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2012, 07:53:38 PM »
Or you can buy something like this to turn your cheeses while you are away. It may turn to evil quickly and eat all your cheeses though  >:D


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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2012, 10:40:48 AM »
You may get slight indentations  from your racks or whatever they are sitting on, and posibly mold buildup but they should be okay if they are not a latic cheese.

Offline jbrun85

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2012, 04:51:54 PM »
thanks for help guys! Sounds like I should do ok. Deejay... What do you mean by mold build up? Also, Lactic cheeses are soft ones right? I'm thinking about ones like derby, cheddar, colby, etc.

Offline Boofer

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2012, 05:05:25 PM »
You also might be better off if you were able to vacuum-seal instead of waxing. Wax has been known to allow mold to grow.

Or consider using natamycin.

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Offline kookookachoo

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2012, 06:03:18 PM »
You also might be better off if you were able to vacuum-seal instead of waxing. Wax has been known to allow mold to grow.

Or consider using natamycin.

-Boofer-


Forgive the dumbness..and it's probably obvious, but I wanted to be sure...Boofer, do you add this to the brine then?  Is that the best way to go?

Steff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2012, 06:09:44 PM »
You also might be better off if you were able to vacuum-seal instead of waxing. Wax has been known to allow mold to grow.

Or consider using natamycin.

-Boofer-


Forgive the dumbness..and it's probably obvious, but I wanted to be sure...Boofer, do you add this to the brine then?  Is that the best way to go?

Steff
Sorry, Steff, never used it so I don't know the particulars. Not dumbness, just ignorance because we don't know the answer. I would expect that linuxboy or Francois would be better informed. If I was to be so inclined I would find out how to use it. Not on my immediate horizon.

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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Leaving cheese alone for extended periods
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2012, 02:22:01 PM »
thanks for help guys! Sounds like I should do ok. Deejay... What do you mean by mold build up? Also, Lactic cheeses are soft ones right? I'm thinking about ones like derby, cheddar, colby, etc.

When you leave cheese unattended sometimes the wild molds can grow and cover your cheese. Vacuum sealing is one way to protect them. 2 months alone in the dark will encourage mold growth. You can wash it off when you get home but I can always taste and smell it.