Author Topic: Coffee Roasting  (Read 7971 times)

Offline Crystal

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2012, 03:34:22 AM »
Tomer, I should be roasting my own, but imagine the buzz id be having. I only drink the freeze dried stuff now, and a lot of it... real coffee all day long and ill be bouncing off the walls!! I think one of the shops near here sells whole beans that you can roast yourself, i might investigate! Also, if i can manage it in a regular pan then i cant see why i shouldnt! Any pointers? I assume 'SHAKE' is one of them? Time and temp are the others?
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Offline curdgirl

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2012, 05:16:34 AM »
Hi. This is my very first post on cheeseforum and it's on coffee beans - how funny is that  ;D

I use a cast iron skillet on the stove top to roast my green beans. We were in Ethiopia a couple of years a go and I had a lot of wonderful coffee prepared for me this way. If so many people the world over can create a decent cuppa using low tech..I figure it's good enough for me. I have the heat about medium (did over roast once on higher heat, lesson learned) and I shake the pan around a bit - or stir it with a wooden spatula. There isn't a consistent colour throughout when it browns (much more consistent if beans aren't on top of each other) but it works fine. When I take them off the heat I have two colanders handy, I run outside with the beans and colanders and start tossing quickly from the pan to the colander and between the colanders - to cool very quickly and to blow away the chaff. Once cooled or at least all the chaff is gone I let it sit somewhere coolish for 30 mins and then it's coffee grinding and making time - Delish! Have fun.
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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2012, 10:53:15 AM »
Hello Heather, welcome to the forum.  I was happy to find out that roasting didn't require fancy expensive equipment! I bought a book, a popper and a thermometer for about $50.  I figure I will be saving $10 a month and getting awesome coffees.  I truly wish I had learned about this decades ago!

Hi Crystal, It creates a lot of smoke.  So if you don't have really good stove vent, you will want to do this outside on a camp stove.

Hi DeejayDebi, The beans look lighter in the photos.  I tried to get picture that would be more accurate but none of them were.  I've been using memory, espresso and french roast beans I have here to judge the roast.  I lined them up and smelled them all too.  I'd be curious to know what your and Burman's favorites are?  Currently I'm just looking for beans that sound good; rich, smooth, big body, thick, mild acidity, bold and will handle a dark roast.  We only drink espresso.  Regular drip coffee seems so weak to me now!
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #18 on: February 27, 2012, 08:26:02 PM »
Well Anut I don't drink much expresso but I like a solid cup. I don't like dishwasher. We do expresso for afternoon break at work. One of the guys brought in a machine that works pretty well.

My Burman's favoite is the Costa Rican Honey Palmares whish is really weird because it is not a strong bold flavor its a lighter caramely flavor with a hint of citrus very relaxing somehow. You just want to sip and enjoy.

Got an email from Jon Burman today wondering why I hadn't tried the El Salvador Honey Cerro Las Ranas which I guess is close to the Costa Rican. I just didn't see it when I ordered last week. He thought I'd jump all over it. Never tried the El Salvador beans.  popped back in and ordered 10 pounds on his recommendation. I guess they see my emails so often asking about the Costa Rican they know what I want.

Also reallly like the Costa Rican Tarrazu "San Marcos" anther Medium bodied and sweet, this cup has a great mix of citrus versus a carmelly darker note.

The Colombian Premium Huila Valencia is more my normal coffee. This is a good slap your face Yeah that's coffee drinkers coffee! Bold, rich, nutty and great for expresso!

The Mexican Terruno Nayarita Organic Natural Peaberry is another great all day drinker. Slightly fruity, sweet and almost chocolaty. Another good expresso bean.

Maui Kaanpali Blend Red/Yellow I love Kona coffee but here on the mainland it's too pricey! When I was staitioned in Hawaii that's all they had and I loved it. This falls short. Not bad but lacks the strong full bodied flavors you associate with the island coffees. I did not care for it as an expresso. Once you go past the 2nd crack it goes ... Hmmm cardboardy? Pulpy? I don't know just looses it completely.

Guatemalan Antigua Finca "Colombia" an excelent example of a good bold Indian coffee with a hint of spice.

Honduran Marcala Special EP bright citrisy and chocolaty. Definate aftertones of orange peel.

Tanzanian AAA Ruvuma (Flat Bean) I am not a fan of flowery Kenyas so I went straight the darker roast for the smokey chocolaty flavors. think this would be a good expresso roast.

Bolivian Org. Microlot:  Mejillones Marcial H This I would definately like to try as an expresso. Rich and pleasent and a great all day coffee.

Indonesian Sumatra Mandehling Gr. 1 I really love Starbucks Sumatra one of my favorite coffees this is richer, and more chocolatety than Starbucks if roasted slightly lighter than Startbucks brand. Another great expresso bean.

Brazil Daterra Villa Borghesi full bodied, fruity and chocolatety not as good as those baove and never tried it as an expresso.

Papua New Guinea Kimel Peaberry excelent all day coffee! I really like the peaberrys for flavor. This is a bit of everything, sweet, citusy, chocolaty, spicey bold - I need do do this one as an expresso roast one day bet it'd kick butt!

Costa Rican Tarrazu Cafetin smooth, sweet, medium bodied but really good! Never tried it as an expresso but I bet it would be good.


Costa Rican Finca de Licho Gary says this hints of brown sugar and honey and it does. Caramely cocoa, and a hint of peach? Excelent all day coffee.

Honduran Marcala San MarcosRich and fruity similar to the EP above but slightly less bright.

Nicaragua FTO Segovia Rich and smooth and a hint of mollases. Very all day good sipper. Might make a great expresso.

Well I think that's all I have notes on. Gary and Jon are really good at describing coffees and telling you how to best roast them. They are also very friendly if you have questions.



 

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #19 on: February 27, 2012, 11:35:29 PM »
Wow! That's quite a reply!  You're awesome!  Names would have been fine!  I haven't got the names and descriptons on my computer yet of the coffees I ordered today, but I'm surprised as I only matched up with 2 on your list.  I was expecting to find lots of common ground.  I'll have to try some of your favorites on my next order.  I do still like drip coffee if it's very strong.  I'll will look forward to making a strong drip coffee with the Colombian Huila Valencia Supremo. 

Today I ordered:

Brazil Bob-o-Link
Brazil Fazenda Aurea Natural
Colombian BCT Prem. Huila - out of stock
Colombian Huila Valencia Supremo
Gautemalan Bella Carmona
Indian Monsooned Malabar
Indonesian Org. RFA Flores
Indonesian Sumatra G1 Tabu Jamu
Malawi Manpanga AA
Rwanda Ruli Mountain
Tanzanian Kigoma Kanyou coop peaberry

I’ll let you know my impressions as I have them since they are all new to me!  I guess I do have an adventurous spirit after all! Though by that time the beans will likely be out of stock.  I would hope that there would enough similarity from year to year to learn what types you like in general.

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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2012, 07:09:20 AM »
Do you roast seperatly before blending or can you blend before roasting meaning you dont have to spend as much time roasting?
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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2012, 11:50:03 AM »
Hi Tomer,

You can do it either way.  I really should do each kind  separately first so I can understand what each type of bean contributes to the blend.  That would also allow you to do a darker or lighter as is ideal for each type of bean.  But I would end up with more roasted coffee that I can consume in a week or two, that's the down side.  Roasting goes fair quick--took nine minutes.  I spend more time with set up and clean up than I do roasting.
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Offline anarch

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2012, 05:24:04 PM »
OK, this looks awesome.  We adore coffee here too.  And have only been buying the premium brands lately because of taste.

Is this really cost effective (aka cheaper) than buying a 12 oz bag of whole beans for about $8-10 at the store? 

I also LOVE good Ethiopian fresh roasted coffee and would love to do it at home.

Equipment wise (unlike cheesemaking) this seems to be something we already have everything for :).

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2012, 06:40:00 PM »
Definitely cheaper! How much so depends on the beans you choose and how much you buy of each type of bean at a time.  Look up Burman or Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting site online.  A few ounces are lost per pound during roasting, so you would end up with 13 oz average?  Not sure as I just started and forgot to weigh my coffee after roasting.  I decided to roast my own when I realized I would have to pay $14-16 or more dollars a pound to get a French or Espresso roast that was acceptable.  I'd rather pay far less for green beans and get a coffee that really makes me smile and say ahhh!  You will be roasting the high end of the green beans available, where as the big roasters, Starbucks and such, are trying to produce a consistent flavor using the cheapest beans they can.  When the price of Starbucks went up and the quality went down I decided I had had enough! 
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2012, 09:39:31 PM »
Ooo you got some good ones there! I missed a few of those. I am going to have to come up with  bean room soon. Maybe I can hang them from the ceiling?  ;D

I highly recoomend you roast them separately and blend after. Each beean has it's own personality and perfect roast. They also roast at different times and temperatures you might loose out by combining until your sure what they are. I have found varying the itme but just 5 or 10 seconds sometimes makes a different flavor.

You do loose a few ounces per pound but the beans increase in size so it evens out as we generally make coffee but spoons not weight. If you are a real coffee lover - you can't beat the flavors of fresh roasted coffee.

So for running out of beans that does happen with some types VERY quickly but there are plenty of types to try and enjoy that are equally enjoyable and new adventures everyday! I find Gary and Jon's descriptions are right on and their monthly email specials give us a chance to buy at a discount as soon as they come in.


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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2012, 11:56:54 PM »
You can hang them from my ceiling!  My order hasn't even got here and I'm already noticing beans I want to try and don't have, or didn't buy enough of!  :)  I tried to stay with beans that would do well as dark roasts (well into 2nd crack) as it may be awhile before I get the knack of when to stop.  It happens so quickly at the end!  The smell is wonderful.  I have a hard time not stopping to smell my roasted coffee beans each time I'm near them.
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Offline george (MaryJ)

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #26 on: February 29, 2012, 04:27:03 AM »
I have a hard time not stopping to smell my roasted coffee beans each time I'm near them.
  Why would you NOT want to stop?   ;D
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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #27 on: February 29, 2012, 11:05:55 AM »
Because I space out and forget what I was supposed to be doing!  It's quite distracting!  ;D
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #28 on: February 29, 2012, 03:00:55 PM »
I need to get some real containers for my coffees but I don't really have the space for containers. I roast about 1/2 pound at a time and put them in lined candy bags. I keep the bags in a room I only use for curing so it's fairly cool with the bags open over night. I have a little row of bags on the file cabinet breathing.

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #29 on: February 29, 2012, 03:14:03 PM »
I liked the idea of the one way valve bags.  I wonder how long they extend the life of coffee?  I would sure love to wander thru your house some time.  I might never leave! 
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