Author Topic: Coffee Roasting  (Read 7011 times)

Offline Brewandwinesupply

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #165 on: May 25, 2012, 03:40:05 PM »
I agree with you on the Brizillian, not a big fan. My supplier has a blend that is pretty good, but I really like the columbian suprimo.
One of the best coffees I had was on a trip to the Domician Republic. Local coffee is hardly exported out of the country. We brought back 5 lbs on the last trip, but have a friend who gets down there a few times a year and brings back a pound or two. Its pre roasted and ground, but very good. Would love to get some green beans some day.
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #166 on: May 25, 2012, 07:32:18 PM »
I definately agree with the breathing. I am in the habit of letting all my bean breath over night before canning them and I think it's less bitter.

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #167 on: May 26, 2012, 10:38:38 AM »
It's hard to wait sometimes!  I have Columbian Supremo beans, but I haven't tried them by themselves yet.  I'll have to try that soon with an extended/slow roast.
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Offline Caseus

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #168 on: May 29, 2012, 08:38:54 PM »
A lot of CO2 outgasses from the beans in the first 24 hours or so after roasting.  It slows down but continues for 2 or 3 days.  I put them in a jar after roasting and cooling and leave the lid ajar for a day, then I seal the jar.  When I open it a day later, I hear a "poof" of gas escaping. 

When I freeze beans, I usually vacuum bag them after 2 or 3 days of degassing.

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #169 on: May 29, 2012, 09:50:37 PM »
I should make a batch just to try different ways to store it to see what keeps it fresh the longest.  I've heard two stories with regards to freezing, so that should be the first experiment.  Vacuum sealed and frozen, vacuum sealed and stored at room temperature.  Maybe a third portion stored under a blanket of CO2 in a sealed jar.

I was looked at an old bag of coffee beans from Starbuck's and I realized that I could not see any oil?  They are a uniform shape, size, color (dark) and dry, no oil!  How could that be??? 
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Offline Caseus

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #170 on: May 29, 2012, 10:21:14 PM »
If you vacuum seal and store at room temperature, the bag will puff up from CO2 because it has nowhere to escape to.  The coffee continues to outgas slowly at room temperature, even if you let them degas for 3 or 4 days before bagging.  You need bags with the one-way air valve like you find in all the pre-packaged whole and ground beans that are sealed in Mylar.  The ones sealed in paper don't need air valves, since they aren't air-tight.

Freezing the roasted beans will tremendously slow down the aging of the beans, and the release of CO2.  The colder the better, and you don't need air-valves.  In fact, if you use bags with air valves, put a piece of tape over it to seal it before you freeze it.   You can vacuum bag, but coffee does just fine frozen in mason jars too.

You can for sure go 6 months frozen without a problem, meaning that you won't be able to tell after thawing that they were frozen.  I just tried some I froze back in August (9 months ago), and they were as good as they were when I froze them.  If you have a manual defrost type deep freeze, you can possibly go even longer.

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #171 on: May 30, 2012, 09:41:18 AM »
Cool.  That would make life easier as I don't always have time to roast and could make some in reserve when I do have time!
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Offline Dulcelife

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #172 on: August 01, 2012, 12:12:36 PM »
Cool, didn't know there was a coffee roasting thread on here.

I'd been a whole-bean user for many years and a faithful Gevalia customer for several of those and just got tired of the over roasted trend or as many of called it Charbucks.

I'm a fan of Colombian Supremo and Ethiopian Yirgacheffe as well as my own native Adjuntas and Yauco Puerto Rican coffees with ties to my Corsican ancestors whom came to the island during Spain's Royal Decree of Graces.

Here's my most recent roast Yemen Mocca Matari at city and full city.

This coffee benefits from two days of setting.

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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #173 on: August 07, 2012, 08:17:52 PM »
Hi Dulcelife,

There are a number of unexpected topics on this forum.  Bread making, bee keeping, and if not now, eventually some on fermented beverages... So many DIY's on this site it's impossible to limit it to cheesemaking!

Having drunk Espresso & French roast most of my life, my taste buds are still trying to get used to acidity!  :o I am finally able to enjoy Tanzanian Peaberry by itself, with a  14 minute roast to Full City+.  Pitiful, just pitiful!  ::)
It's going to be awhile before I can enjoy any of your favorites!  :o  How long do you extend your roasts to tame the wild ones?

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Offline Dulcelife

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #174 on: August 08, 2012, 10:33:33 AM »
I am going 15 minutes, maybe a bit longer on these Yemen beans.  The darker roast did loose a lot of its origin so, I made a 50/50 origin blend of the two roasts and its absolutely divine.  Lots of berries, some earth, smoke, and a touch of cocoa.  I had to put a limit on myself, else I'd drink it all day and suffer the night.

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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #175 on: August 08, 2012, 03:45:29 PM »
That's what I started doing as well.  I've been roasting Brazil or Indos dark and mixing them with bright and monsooned coffees that are roasted to full city+ for an extended for 14 - 16 minutes.  It's like having your cake and eating it too!  Dark roasted coffee all by itself is a little flat, but I miss the dark roast flavors in blends that are all full city+ or less.  Figuring out how long to extend roasts is challenging.  I'm finding that each type of bean is different and so I'm doing a lot of trial and error.  Too short a roast :o  Too long a roast ZZZZZZ.  Thankfully my sweetie drinks espresso, so beans that come out to flat for me are perfect for him. 

Here's a question I can't answer... I have decaf espresso beans from Starbucks that have yet to show any signs of oil.  How does that happen???  What did they change?  Their dark roasted coffee used to be decent, not great but okay, but now it's hopelessly bland.  Just as well as I wouldn't have learned I could roast my own beans if I hadn't gotten pissed about paying $13 a pound for flat beans.
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Offline Dulcelife

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Re: Coffee Roasting
« Reply #176 on: August 09, 2012, 07:10:29 AM »
They may have changed the method of decaffeinating.  In very general terms you have a direct and an indirect method of extracting the caffeine.  In one method (direct), the oils are brought to the surface by steaming and then application of ethylene chloride or ethyl acetate (an organic solvent) eliminates most of the caffeine.  In the water method (indirect), the bean are soaked and most everything in the bean including the caffeine is extracted into said water.  The drained water is then treated via solvent or filtration.  The caffeine-free water with all other desirable components in solution is returned to the beans and dried on.  There are other methods of course since its a big bad world and coffee grows in lots of the world.

Regardless, I can't imagine there being quantities of oil left after these processes. Maybe Starbucks used an post processing oil component at one time?  Who knows?

On the question of blending, I believe that blending at least two roast levels of every origin, especially if one likes the darker roast, is essential to appreciate the beans full potential.  This, and letting the roasted beans set for a couple of days is my standard practice.  This morning I was out of full city+ Yemen Mocca Matari so, I blended 50/50 with the Brazil Natural full city+.  Its okay but not up to the flavor of the 50/50 Yemen I posted about above.

Happy roasting.
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