Author Topic: Technicalities of using bulk tank or vat pasteuriser from Europe in N. America?  (Read 737 times)

Offline curdgirl

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I'm looking to set up a small commercial (goat) dairy in Canada. I can't seem to get my head around the electrical issues of using a bulk tank (with chilling) or a vat pasteuriser brought over from Europe. I'm in process of moving from England to Canada and it seems - on one level - to make sense to bring either with me if I can get them at a good price (we're shipping a container anyway). Can someone help on this technical/mechanical side of things?

I know the power is different - 110v vs 220 or 230v - but I've heard this doesn't have to be a problem. I think a converter or invertor (?) or some such was mentioned.. and that this isn't a big deal?

The other issue I've heard is with some equipment needing 3-phase power and this being a much bigger issue in North America..

From the general to the specific, I've just seen a 90gallon bulk tank at a good price which is single phase, 230v and comes with double wall stainless steel jacket, cover and agitator with motor. It however doesn't have a compressor, which I'm thinking is necessary for chilling? SO, those in the know: could I use such a machine in North America without much hassle to chill my milk - and - would I be able to get hold of an appropriate compressor to do the job in N.A.?

Thanks for any help with this - oh to have taken motor mechanics!
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Offline Oude Kaas

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That shouldn't be any problem Although the standard voltage in North America is  approximately 110, every service connection has  single phase 240 volt as well. You can connect up your agitator to this without any hassle. Three phase exists here as well but not always in rural areas.
And you should be able to find a compressor at this side of the Atlantic.

Offline curdgirl

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thanks so much for this, it's very helpful.

In terms of a bulk tank I have another question too if you don't mind: if a bulk tank cools is there much involved in having it also heat? I've heard of bulk tanks that can do both so I'm wondering if that's the way to go, or if a chill tank can be modified, or if it's better to just have separate tanks?

thanks again!
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Offline george13

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If you plan on going legal and getting licensed, the bulk tank will need to cool only, regulators in the states at least are not fond of dual purpose units.  The bulk tank usually holds unpasteurized milk and their objective is to keep it at around 40F.  Not sure about Canada, but most likely they may follow similar guidlines.