Author Topic: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like  (Read 5897 times)

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #45 on: May 15, 2012, 10:59:33 AM »
I hesitate to inject with wine or beer because of the active yeast, fermenting and associated outgassing.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #46 on: May 15, 2012, 07:33:47 PM »
I hesitate to inject with wine or beer because of the active yeast, fermenting and associated outgassing.
The Grand Experiment, Ed.

Nothing ventured...nothing gained. Brie gave me the encouragement I needed to try this. If it bombs, at least I will have some education behind me if the thought crosses my mind in the future. On the other hand, if it proves successful, I have not only helped myself, but perhaps one or two others who may take this path.  8)

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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #47 on: May 15, 2012, 08:00:14 PM »
I agree. Innovation and new ideas are born out of failure, mistakes and accidents. If we didn't try (and fail), how would we invent new "stuff"

I know that injecting with wine is done, but I suspect that there are some trade secrets that "they" aren't telling us. I produce a few spirit infused cheeses and I can tell you that it is very important to be sure that the pH and calcium are in balance. That still leaves the active yeast problem. :D
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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #48 on: May 16, 2012, 04:55:52 AM »
Quote
That still leaves the active yeast problem
If you want to off the yeast just take the wine to 50-55c for about 30 minutes with the lid on.

Having said that, most white wines are sterile filtered.  Espacially thos with residual sugar. so given you work with a freshly opened bottled you will have close to no yeast induced by the wine.
Commerical (non bottle conditioned) beers (tank conditioned) are too filtered and contain very little viable yeast in it if any.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #49 on: May 21, 2012, 05:45:57 PM »
I decided not to inject Vouvray this past weekend. It seemed like the cheese could stand a little break, and I thought the wine needed more time to ease into the paste.

The thing that has really been bothering me about this cheese (both of them) is the B. linens that has taken up refuge here. I needed to knock it back. This isn't supposed to be a washed rind cheese, blue or otherwise. The aroma from the linens is was pretty strong. I added a little salt to some Vouvray and proceeded to gently wash the linens off. So you could say that the cheese did get a little wine added to it this week after all...but not very much.

We'll see how it fares from this point on.

The little guy has his own set of problems. The process for both cheeses was very different and the little guy ended up being more moist than the main cheese. For a while I was tempted just to go ahead and cut it, but I decided a little time by himself might help him out. After washing the little guy, I wrapped him in cheese paper.

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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #50 on: May 21, 2012, 07:37:56 PM »
Oh its gone be soft and stinky in there ;)
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #51 on: May 26, 2012, 09:55:27 AM »
This is the 7 week point. I had decided not to inject any more wine into the cheeses. Probably a good decision. For this first effort...no sense in going overboard.

The main cheese looks great after washing the linens off. The rind is dry, but not exceptionally so. There is slight wine seepage under the cheese and from some of the lower piercings on the sides. It looks like a little more continued affinage following the current regimen should complete the cheese.

Now let me turn my attention to the little guy. This cheese was actually extra curd that wouldn't initially fit into the main mould. I had to put it somewhere. With that course of action, the treatment, pressing, injecting, and aging has been quite different than the main cheese. This cheese started out with a lot more moisture and has stayed that way, especially with the aid of the wine injections. I had my doubts as to what I would end with at the end.

As of today, my doubts have been squashed. This is a creamy cheese with a kiss of salt and blue. The rind is wonderful (I had my doubts about the rind too because of the extensive linens growth.) and teams up with the paste to deliver a very nuanced blue flavor. I think it mimics the original Regina Blu (from Germany) fairly closely.

My Quality Control sample is out this morning to come to room temperature. Ahhh, breakfast!

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Offline H-K-J

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #52 on: May 26, 2012, 10:12:36 AM »
yer makin my mouth water :P great job!!!
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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #53 on: May 26, 2012, 10:26:02 AM »
Awesome cheese!  Lovely way to wake up in the morning.  ^-^
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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #54 on: May 26, 2012, 12:44:04 PM »
That looks like a really nice result.  With your notes you should be able to recreate the little guy as well.  We're moving this week, hence all my cheese making and testing has to be vicarious.  I'm doing well that way it seems! :)

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Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #55 on: May 26, 2012, 02:32:35 PM »
Great looking cheeses Boofer, so much different from what I achieved. But, I'm still missing your report about the taste???
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Offline Aris

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #56 on: May 26, 2012, 06:53:21 PM »
Good looking cheese and it has a decent amount of blue mold in the paste.  The paste does resemble a fourme d ambert's paste except it doesn't have that much blue mold. Maybe next time you'll get this right. Did the wine flavor still lingers in the cheese?

Offline Boofer

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #57 on: May 26, 2012, 07:09:21 PM »
Great looking cheeses Boofer, so much different from what I achieved. But, I'm still missing your report about the taste???
I enjoyed it this morning with sliced apple. The cheese was soft and gooey in places. Possibly from the starting moisture and enhanced by the wine. It had a little saltiness to it along with just a touch of blue flavor. Both had just the right measure. Small pieces of it perched on thin apple slices created a marvelous taste. Before I  knew it, the cheese sample was gone...and I wanted more. (Later.)

Good looking cheese and it has a decent amount of blue mold in the paste.  The paste does resemble a fourme d ambert's paste except it doesn't have that much blue mold. Maybe next time you'll get this right. Did the wine flavor still lingers in the cheese?
Since this is only the third blue cheese (and only the first wine-injected!) I have made, I do have a way to go in my cheese-making education.

I wouldn't say that I sensed a wine characteristic to the paste, but I'm sure that it helped create the overall texture and flavor I enjoyed this morning. I'm really curious about the main cheese in this make. It promises to be something memorable.

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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #58 on: May 26, 2012, 10:15:22 PM »
That looks awsome Boofer! Another cheese for you!




Offline Brie

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Re: Reluctantly...Fourme d'Ambert-like
« Reply #59 on: May 27, 2012, 07:39:22 PM »
Great looking cheeses Boofer, so much different from what I achieved. But, I'm still missing your report about the taste???
I enjoyed it this morning with sliced apple. The cheese was soft and gooey in places. Possibly from the starting moisture and enhanced by the wine. It had a little saltiness to it along with just a touch of blue flavor. Both had just the right measure. Small pieces of it perched on thin apple slices created a marvelous taste. Before I  knew it, the cheese sample was gone...and I wanted more. (Later.)

Good looking cheese and it has a decent amount of blue mold in the paste.  The paste does resemble a fourme d ambert's paste except it doesn't have that much blue mold. Maybe next time you'll get this right. Did the wine flavor still lingers in the cheese?
Since this is only the third blue cheese (and only the first wine-injected!) I have made, I do have a way to go in my cheese-making education.

I wouldn't say that I sensed a wine characteristic to the paste, but I'm sure that it helped create the overall texture and flavor I enjoyed this morning. I'm really curious about the main cheese in this make. It promises to be something memorable.

-Boofer-

If you have tried the cheese without the wine, you should be able to detect a difference. You continue to amaze me, Boof, with the time you take to record everything! Either a Virgo or Capricorn, I suspect ): I am wondering why the blue veins are just in the punctured holes...I normally punch on the sides as well as the top and bottom. This cheese is quite soft, so needs to be out of its box every other day to promote the air to circulate. The fact that you felt it was heavenly is the best review--congrats!
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.