Author Topic: Trying a Stiltonesque this time  (Read 4284 times)

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #60 on: June 15, 2012, 03:12:50 PM »
Hi,

Well, had a sample.  Unfortunately, not good.  The amonia that I detected early on seems to have put this one off.  The paste has an acceptable texture, but it's already very spicy and not in a good way.  Doesn't taste "spoiled", just amoniated.  Poor agining conditions on my part, which is a shame, but at least I didn't subject others with it! :)

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Offline Aris

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #61 on: June 15, 2012, 10:17:58 PM »
I think aging time has also got to do with it. Maybe next time pierce early and age it to 40 days max.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #62 on: June 16, 2012, 12:00:21 AM »
Hi Aris,

Shorter might have been ok, but the moisture was too high on the first few weeks in the cave and that's when the mould went into overdrive and ammoniated the paste.  I think it was that, more than time, that is to blame.  If I can get the environment right, then it will be a matter of figureing out the proper aging time.

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Offline Boofer

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #63 on: June 16, 2012, 01:28:39 AM »
Sorry for that, Jeff. I've got a feeling you'll greatly improve on your next effort.

That's kind of the same feeling I came away with for my Stiltonesque cheeses. Same coloring too. I asked my wife whether they smelled like ammonia and she said they didn't. Still, they were too harsh and bitey. Very different than my recent Fourme d'Amberts which were (and are) very nice. Maybe give that style a go?

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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #64 on: June 16, 2012, 02:10:00 AM »
Thanks Boofer.

I'm sure the next one will be better since it could hardly be worse; well, no, things are never so bad they can't be worse but you know what I mean! :)  The colouring is ok, well, I've had bought blues with that deep yellow colour that were fantastic.  It is definately a result of too moist, causing blue overdrive.  I was hoping the daily airings would take care of it, but no, it had penetrated the paste and was there to stay.  I think the mould I harvested is a very fast devloping one as well, so Aris' suggestion of cutting earlier is also to be noted.  Not sure when I give it go next.  I'm going to get a hygrometer first though.  Cheddars and such you can get away with a bit of play, but blues need more care.

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Offline H-K-J

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #65 on: June 16, 2012, 11:20:40 AM »
Quote
I'm going to get a hygrometer first though.  Cheddars and such you can get away with a bit of play, but blues need more care.

Jeff, that was one thing I have found you have to keep an eye on the RH, the ammonia aroma my first Stilton had is the number one reason I joined the forum :o
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Offline Aris

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #66 on: June 16, 2012, 07:42:43 PM »
Jeff,
What was the aging temperature of the cheese? Yeah you must have harvested a fast growing blue mold. Don't quote me on this but from my observation cheese like Roquefort use fast growing mold. However it is wrapped in foil and stored in cool temperature of 6 c (or less) for several months after being aged for 21 days or more in the cave.  And it is also rindless. I think those 2 factors is the reason why i never tasted ammonia in a Roquefort. If you happen to use that same blue mold culture you could try aging the cheese at a cooler temperature like 8c perhaps and age it 60 days. Or the old temp you used but shorter aging time, like 40 days.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #67 on: June 16, 2012, 07:59:51 PM »
Hi Aris,

The cave is about 8-10 C at the moment.  I think what happens is that when the cheese first goes in the ripening box, I didn't have the lid far enough ajar, and given how wet the curds are, once in the box the humidity just spikes and this ends up being the wrong situation for development.  Then again, the paste was fine for the first and 2nd piercings (the bits that oozed out), so I'm pretty sure if I cut it then it would have been ok?  It may be that I needed this to be cut sooner, or as you say, wrapped and put in the regular fridge to really slow it down.  Will get there though. 

- Jeff
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Offline T-Bird

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #68 on: July 17, 2012, 06:25:11 PM »
you got good blue coverage. That is one of the things that is hard to do. Once you get that down, modify your aging technique, to fit your "production situation". Change 1 thing at a time.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #69 on: July 17, 2012, 06:43:25 PM »
Thanks T-Bird.  Yah, this one looked like it was going to be a treat.  A buddy was over the day I cut it, and when I showed it to him he thought it looked really good, so I told him to sniff test it, and then he realized my pain!  Still, I think the next make will work out well.  This was the first of my makes to go in the bin.  At least I got that over with.  No more worrying "will this be the one?" :)

- Jeff
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Offline T-Bird

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #70 on: July 20, 2012, 07:21:00 PM »
I threw 2 or 3 in the bin for lack of blue coverage earlier as part of my learning curve-disheartening after working with it 12 wks. Once I figured out how to get good internal bluing, for my situation and cheese size, 12 wks was way too long too age. I landed on 9wks and I may cut the next one at 8wks.
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #71 on: July 20, 2012, 08:31:02 PM »
Hey, T-Bird, you might check out doing a Fourme d'Ambert. I've had one done for a while now, vacuum-sealed, and it's terrific.

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Offline T-Bird

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #72 on: August 13, 2012, 06:42:25 PM »
Hey Boof I just saw this post today, been working more lately, not as much time on the forum. I watched your Fourme d'ambert progress, I've never seen or eaten one.I heard of it for the first time on this forum. It looks interesting. Got some "life bumps" to get over then I may give something new a shot!
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #73 on: August 13, 2012, 10:31:50 PM »
I'd never heard of Fourme d'Ambert before I saw it on the forum. I'm glad I did. A mild blue for sure.  :)

Good luck on your life bumps. They do even out.

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Offline T-Bird

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #74 on: August 14, 2012, 07:07:08 AM »
What was your mold source for the Fd'A (is that a bona fide abbreviation?) Boofer?
Never express yourself more clearly that you can think-Neils Bohr