Author Topic: Trying a Stiltonesque this time  (Read 3746 times)

Online Boofer

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #75 on: August 14, 2012, 08:44:18 AM »
      I don't believe that
FdA or Fd'A are qualified abbreviations of Fourme d'Ambert, it just seems easier if the dialogue continues once the cheese style has been mentioned at the outset to use a moniker.

I had recently sampled some blues from igourmet.com and it seemed like a natural to slurry them up for these cheeses.

For my first make in this style:
  • a slurry of Regina Blu
"Regina Blu
This new specialty from Paladin has an extremely mild and creamy flavor. Its extravagant richness is due to the fact that the cheese has a 65% fat content. Paladin is calling extra creamy Regina Blu, "the new queen of our blue cheeses from Bavaria". This German blue is easy to cut and is delicious spread or melted over steak, crackers, or potatoes."
[/list]

For my second effort:
  • a slurry from a Fourme d’Amberg I just happened to have in my fridge
"Fourme d'Ambert AOC
This AOC (name controlled) creamy blue cheese is a lovely French treasure. "Fourme" is the old French word for cheese from the Latin noun forma, describing its cylindrical shape. Ambert is the mountainous town in Auvergne where the cheese is made. The people of this town have been making Fourme d'Ambert since the 7th century! That makes this cheese as old as Roquefort. Fourme d'Ambert is high in moisture and compact in texture, so the blue mould does not spread in veins like other Blues. Rather, it forms in distinct, disconnected pockets. Compared to Blue Stilton, it is much creamier and, therefore, less crumbly. Fourme d'Ambert is cave-aged for a minimum of two months, made from raw cow's milk and has a tremendous, creamy, full-bodied flavor."

I got a little antsy and thought this make needed a little push, so I painted on:
  • a slurry of Blue Castello
"Blue Castello
This brie-like blue cheese from Denmark is now made by Danish owned factory in the United States. Blue Castello is richer than its cousin, Saga Blue, which is also made in the United States. Castello is a distant derivative of Italian Gorgonzola but has a higher fat content and a milder flavor. It is a perfect blue for those who like a little blue flavor without being blown away."
[/list]

Sorry, Jeff, I don't mean to hijack your thread.  A)

-Boofer-
« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 08:57:20 AM by Boofer »
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Offline T-Bird

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #76 on: August 15, 2012, 07:01:27 AM »
That Fd'A picture looks like my "Stilton"- who knows what I'M making!
Never express yourself more clearly that you can think-Neils Bohr

Online Boofer

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Re: Trying a Stiltonesque this time
« Reply #77 on: August 15, 2012, 10:41:56 AM »
T-Bird, I believe one characteristic that differentiates the Fourme d'Ambert style from the Stilton is the rind. When I made my Stilton effort, the rind got all nasty-looking (see the attached picture). In comparison, the rind of my FdA is pretty clean, which I prefer (sorry, Sailor :)).

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.