Author Topic: Roadside cheeseballs in the Dominican Republic  (Read 813 times)

Offline peacenique

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Roadside cheeseballs in the Dominican Republic
« on: April 17, 2012, 08:49:45 AM »
Hello,

Recently I visited the north side of the Dominican Republic.  Everywhere you see food being sold at the side of the road... and I sampled most everything!  One of the things you commonly see for sale are grapefruit-sized balls of white cheese.  These balls are wrapped in thin plastic bags and are simply hanging from whatever they can be hung from!  The texture of this cheese is semi-firm and rubbery... similar to a soft mozzarella.  There is not a lot of flavour, to be honest.  I was slicing off chunks to make sandwiches with tomatoes and onions.

I figure they must be rather simple to make, as they were everywhere ~ every shack in the road.  After researching I am coming up with "queso blanco" and "queso fresco".  I was about to jump in and try a "blanco" recipe when I realized everywhere it talks about being able to crumble it.  The cheese I ate was certainly not crumbly!  You definitely had to cut it.  Actually, it was rather difficult to cut into thin slices because of the rubbery factor.

I see another type of cheese called "asadero" and it says it's rubbery...

Can anybody help point me in the right direction?

Thank you.


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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Roadside cheeseballs in the Dominican Republic
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2012, 09:32:09 AM »
Any fresh pasta fillata style will meet your demand.
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Offline MrsKK

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Re: Roadside cheeseballs in the Dominican Republic
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2012, 10:36:50 PM »
I've never made it, but my guess is that you are looking for queso fresco.  Asadero would be more like a Latin version of mozzarella.  Which could also be what you were finding there.