Author Topic: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location  (Read 2431 times)

Offline John (CH)

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Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« on: February 07, 2009, 08:17:48 PM »
This thread is based on a good question Likesspace/Dave raised in this thread, namely, how to control amount and location of bluing in Blue Cheeses?

This thread is for issues around blue cheese making including Penicillium roqueforti, not for issues of piercing blue cheeses as those are covered in this thread.

My initial current understanding is:
  • Penicillium roqueforti is a very aggressive self replicating mold.
  • Only a little bit of P roqueforti is required to inoculate the cheese.
  • As it is such a strong mold, it's source can be store bought manufactured culture form a small piece of store bought blue cheese.
  • P roqueforti needs air and moisture and cheese as food to grow.
  • The amount of interior molding is dependant on piercings linking up with voids to get air into the interior of the cheese and/or amount and connectedness of voids.
  • Amount of voids is a function of cheese making, not aging process, dryer curds will give more voids.
  • Cheese should not be or only minimally pressed otherwise voids will be lost.

Anyway those are my opinions/thoughts, others?


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Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2009, 08:35:24 PM »
This is a great thread, and represents the second biggest reason I really like this forum. 
The desire to learn and pass on that knowledge.

I might suggest that this feature is expanded and we somehow capture, collect and present the "lessons learned" for each cheese varietal.

 

Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas

Offline Likesspace

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Re: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2009, 09:14:42 PM »
I really hope some of the blue experts voice their opinions to this thread. I've looked at pictures of professionally made Stiltons and the veining is beyond impressive.
I would love to be able to produce one of the blues that has tiny "spider" veins running throughout the entire interior of the cheese.
If anyone is not familair with what I am talking about simply google Stilton cheese and then go to the images tab. You will see some great examples of quality Stiltons.
Great post, John. I agree with Wayne that this is one of the many things that makes this forum great.

Dave

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2009, 06:26:57 PM »
Well I use 1/8 tsp for 5 gal and 3/16-1/4 tsp. for 15 gallons. I'm making a stilton right now 15 gallon and used a 1/4 tsp. measuring spoon and didn't quite fill it.

if you go to http://www3.telus.net/public/hsource/cheesemaking/ this is a guy on the "other" forum. He does a lot of blues where he uses pieces of blue cheese from the store as an innoculant.

As far as location and veining. I just start out about 1" from outer edge and pierce...oops wasn't supposed to mention piercing in this thread...so never mind.

As far as mold my older books say to mix it when mixing in the salt right before putting in the mold. My newer books say to put it in after pre-ripening. I find it easier to get full distribution by rehydrating in 1 cup room temp water while my milk is heating up. Then after pre-ripening, before adding rennet, I mix it in well then add my rennet and BAMMM there ya have it.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline mako

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Re: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2009, 05:25:18 PM »
As far as getting the right sort of structure for good vein formation on the inside, apparently one method is to use 2 different batches of curd -- a soft curd to provide a smooth outer surface, and a firm curd to provide a bunch of nice open voids on the interior. I saw it here:

http://www.cheesemaking.com/store/pg/31.html

I'm intrigued, but I've never done a blue before, so I'm going to hold off on the complex, architectural cheese making projects till I have a better sense of the basics. (Also, when it comes to blues, I'd almost always rather have a stilton than a gorgonzola. But that's just me.) It seems to be a good tip on how to control the location of bluing, anyway -- if you're willing to put some extra effort in.


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Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2009, 05:29:21 PM »
Another good way to get good veins is age, vericose (sp?) veins that is.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Old Man Cheese

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Re: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2009, 11:05:09 PM »
I was in the Dr's office the other day and he had a bunch of "medical definitions" on the wall --
only remember two: vericose = right next to you     vein = conceited
I love this Dr....LOL

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2009, 07:05:08 PM »
I've never made standard "Blue Cheese," but I've made gorganzolla which is an Italian blue cheese and one of the tricks of the trade so to speak is to inject one side wait 10 days then turn it around a inject the other side.

This is my process:

Gorgonzola

Ingredients:
3 gallons Cows milk
1/2 teaspoon Thermo B Culture
1/8 teaspoon Penicillin roqueforti
Rennet
Salt

Procedure:
-Heat to the temperature of approximately 86°F
-Add cultures and mix well. Ripen for about 45 minutes.
-Add rennet and wait approximately half hour.
-Cut  the curds in one direction only about 1 inch wide. Wait 10 minutes then cut in the other direction and wait another 10 minutes before cutting inside the curds to a size of about a walnut.
-Drain the curd in cheese cloth for about 20 minutes.
-Crumble curds then add salt to the curds and put in molds with 2 pounds of weight for 24 hours.
-Remove the molds. Air dry at about 70°F for 3-4 days. 
-After at least 15 days mix Penicillin roqueforti per manufacturers instruction. -Inject the top of the cheeses using large metallic needles. After another 10 days inject the cheeses again from the opposite side of the cheese.
-The air that penetrates in the holes allows to the  Penicillum in the curd to develop itself, giving to allowing the characteristic venature blue-greens that render this unmistakable cheese or for the aspect or for the sapore.
-The development of the mold begins after 20-30 days and aids in the maturation process. After 50-60 days the gorgonzola is ready for the consumption.
-The cheese is wrapped in foil to preserve moisture and the affinage continues for a total of 3-6 months.  Typically, gorgonzola cheese is formed into 22 lb. wheels that develop a reddish rind as they age.

Gorgonzola is made in three styles:
"dolce" (sweet) - with a smooth and creamy consistency, because of cream which is added to the milk, has a slightly piquant taste and is aged for only a short time;
"forte or piccante" - having a thicker consistency, slightly crumbly, with a stronger and sharper taste; 
"stravecchio" - aged for many months, with a medium hard curd, brown color with green mold stripes, having a stronger taste than the other two styles.

Offline Cyn

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Re: Blue Cheese Molding: How Control Amount, Location
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2009, 04:20:52 PM »
I have a recipe for a Stilton-style. Milk is inoculated at time of culturing. Curds are stirred 30 minutes, then drained overnight, torn & salted, and then pressed. The cheese is salt-rubbed, to form the rubbery stilton rind. I've made lots of softer blue cheese, but I really wanted to give this Stilton a whirl.

I tried it this weekend. The curds after 6 hours of draining were far too dry and never formed a cohesive wheel after I placed them in the mould. Lots of open spaces for the blue to grow, and I'm sure if I had moulded earlier, with wetter curd, it would have set better.

Sorry - got off track - point being, draining the curds and then tearing them apart and moulding leaves a plethora of internal gaps to stimulate the P roq...