Author Topic: Cream Volume in Milk  (Read 1399 times)

Offline SarahV63

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Cream Volume in Milk
« on: April 30, 2012, 09:57:04 AM »
Hello!

I am getting about 1 1/3 cups cream per gallon of milk. How does this compare ON AVERAGE to other people's experiences? They are Holsteins.

I am curious because one person I spoke to claimed to be getting 4 cups of cream per gallon. I don't think this is possible.

Thanks!

Sarah
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2012, 03:19:31 PM »
Holstens tend to produce less cream than Jersey's do. We used to get about 2 cups/gallon from out holstens as a kid.

Offline Cloversmilker

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2012, 08:54:19 PM »
My Jersey gives at least 4 cups per gallon.  More when she's in a good mood.   ;)  Not all of it is really thick though.  The cream from my previous Jersey was so thick that you could stand a knife in it.   :o

Offline SarahV63

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2012, 01:55:30 PM »
Holstens tend to produce less cream than Jersey's do. We used to get about 2 cups/gallon from out holstens as a kid.

I go any time of the day and the don't turn the stirring arm (don't know the technical name) in the big tank on till we go out there. Could it be that there isn't enough time to stir the cream back in before we draw the milk? In this case, would it help if I went right after or when they are milking? I don't want to seem rude by asking them leave it on longer. Thanks!
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2012, 10:27:38 PM »
Most people will stir before pouring so you don't pour off to mucch cream at once.


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Offline SarahV63

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2012, 11:21:09 AM »
My Jersey gives at least 4 cups per gallon.  More when she's in a good mood.   ;)  Not all of it is really thick though.  The cream from my previous Jersey was so thick that you could stand a knife in it.   :o

WOW! Must be nice. I'd love to keep a cow but I live in town. )= In a few years and it will be a Jersey...
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Offline MrsKK

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2012, 03:05:00 PM »
I leave the calf with my cow so I don't have to milk twice a day every day of her lactation.  She learns to hold back some of the cream for the calf and when she does that I get about 2-3 cups of cream per gallon.  When she is later in lactation and producing a low enough amount of milk that I can milk just once a day, no calf on her, I get at least 4-6 cups of cream per gallon.  Very, very thick - the top layer would easily support a spoon.

My cow is 3/4 Jersey, 1/4 Holstein.

Offline SarahV63

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2012, 06:03:42 AM »
I bet it makes her happier to have her baby with her too.People say animals don't have emotions but that is so much bunk. Its amazing she has learned to do that. Just shows another type of intelligence. Can you imagine a woman being able to control her output like that? That sounds like a good breed mix - more cream in conjunction with higher overall yields. (=
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Offline MrsKK

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2012, 09:45:12 PM »
She's such a good momma, whether to her own calf or to the fosters she raises every year.  I'm willing to put up with less cream in exchange for a happy cow and healthy calves.  Our current baby is just over three weeks old and she's gaining an average of 15 pounds per week.  So at least I know the cream is being put to good use!

I like the cross-bred vigor, too.  She's big for a Jersey, at just over 1,000 lbs on average, but she's got the shorter Jersey legs.  We've been breeding her to Angus to get faster growing calves and will be sending #3 to the butcher on Tuesday - he weighs just over 1,000 lbs and is 17 months old.  He'll make nice beef.

Offline SarahV63

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #9 on: May 06, 2012, 09:49:56 AM »
She's such a good momma, whether to her own calf or to the fosters she raises every year.  I'm willing to put up with less cream in exchange for a happy cow and healthy calves.  Our current baby is just over three weeks old and she's gaining an average of 15 pounds per week.  So at least I know the cream is being put to good use!

I like the cross-bred vigor, too.  She's big for a Jersey, at just over 1,000 lbs on average, but she's got the shorter Jersey legs.  We've been breeding her to Angus to get faster growing calves and will be sending #3 to the butcher on Tuesday - he weighs just over 1,000 lbs and is 17 months old.  He'll make nice beef.

Sounds like a great cow. My mom grew up on a farm (pigs) but they kept a few dairy and beef cattle and she always said the dairy cows were intelligent and friendly but the beef cattle were just that... no personalities. And those boys will be tasty, muahahaha! Sorry! lol. My fangs were growing.
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Offline MrsKK

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2012, 12:53:54 PM »
We kept steers (dairy breeds) for several years before I got my milk cow and I'm amazed at the difference in personality and intelligence.  If I'd known just how much I'd fall in love with a cow, I never would have gotten a horse!

I'm really eager to try Stewart beef...yes, we name all of our calves and even refer to them by name when we're eating them.  They're happy while they are here and they make us happy when they're in the freezer.

Offline jersey12

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Re: Cream Volume in Milk
« Reply #11 on: June 21, 2012, 10:09:42 PM »
My jersey, Holly is giving at least 5 cups of cream per gallon - after three days in the fridge its so thick you could stand a spoon up in it.  I havn't measured the volume specifically, but the cream line in my most of my 1.125litre bottles is literally half the bottle, the rest are well over a third:)  The last two cheese I have made had way too much cream - they whey was milky and the cream seperated to the top after 12 hours, so I will need to start skimming a bit I think.

She is seven months into her lactation and we had to wean her calf a month ago due to her teat injury.  She's also on very high quality feed and supplements, to gain condition and to help her recover (plus we now have green pasture as its winter here).
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