Author Topic: Cross-contamination of bacteria possible in a saturated brine?  (Read 546 times)

Offline Silver

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I am about to brine a Fourme d Ambert (Blue Cheese lightly pressed using MM100 and peni roqueforti PV) for about 6 hours in my 'already used' saturated brine.

Two questions:

The brine has had mostly B Linen cheeses in it such as Brick and Tilsit, Talleggio). So if I brine the Amberts will...

A. The Ambert pick up some B Linens and/or
B. Will the brine pick up Peni Roq (if I brine the Amberst) and spread to future cheeses I brine?

I would have though the saturated brine would not allow for the B Linens or Peni Roq to survive? I just don't won't my blues to turn orange or my oranges to turn blue. I have a feeling they may look purple if that happens!!

Any thoughts or knowledge on this one?


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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Cross-contamination of bacteria possible in a saturated brine?
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2012, 07:09:41 AM »
You can boil the brine to kill anything living in it.
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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Cross-contamination of bacteria possible in a saturated brine?
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2012, 03:04:59 PM »
You can also use a little bit of bleach.
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