Author Topic: Turning - Tapered (Conical Pyramid) Mold Cheeses  (Read 732 times)

Offline FrenchBroadGoats

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Turning - Tapered (Conical Pyramid) Mold Cheeses
« on: May 22, 2012, 08:43:00 PM »
Ok, some help here. I have searched past listing and posts and have found nothing that explains a particular problem I am having: how to flip cheeses (particular lactic cheeses) made in tapered molds. I read lots of recipes that say 'flip the crottin after 6 hours...' or flip the selles sur chelles after 4 hours" but none tell me how to fit the fat end into the skinny end of the mold. What's the trick?


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Turning - Tapered (Conical Pyramid) Mold Cheeses
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2012, 08:50:35 PM »
Flipping is to ensure even drainage. In a pyramidal type, you may either skip it, or flip in mold. Open end onto mat, closed end as is to drain.
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Offline FrenchBroadGoats

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Re: Turning - Tapered (Conical Pyramid) Mold Cheeses
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2012, 07:34:30 PM »
I get it now. I knew about the evening out of moisture, but I have clearly been flipping too soon. I'd dump a pyramid and watch it ooze all over the mat. After that I'd just leave it (and sometimes get a toad skin for my lack of pains). There's nothing like a good word from a pro. Thanks.

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Turning - Tapered (Conical Pyramid) Mold Cheeses
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2012, 08:09:59 PM »
It can be a little tricky. You can manage the moisture level by the ladle size you use to scoop, or curd size if cutting, as well as the number of holes in the mold (more finer holes=faster drainage). Depending on the amount of rennet and strength, might also be possible to cut and stir to predrain a little. Good luck!
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