Author Topic: Kombucha Cheese--medieval cheeses  (Read 1043 times)

Offline TraditionalGoats

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Kombucha Cheese--medieval cheeses
« on: June 15, 2012, 10:25:59 AM »
Hi,

I hope I have this in the right area.

I was reading about some cheesemaking fun at this blog:  http://medievalcheese.blogspot.com/

Somewhere in this blog there was a mention of making kombucha cheese but she didn't have a recipe.  I have searched for a recipe as well with pretty much, no luck.

I would assume strong kombucha would be used like vinegar to get the curd to separate? 

Any thoughts? 

My idea for this would be to take some strong (vinegar strong) kombucha and add to the milk at about 180 F.  Let curdle then drain.  Maybe press?  Not sure.

Suggestions, ideas, thoughts? 

Or a recipe would be great. 

Tracy


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Kombucha Cheese--medieval cheeses
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2012, 10:39:45 AM »
You mean, a basic heat-acid induced coagulation? Or acid used for direct acidified pasta filata?

This is no different than using any acid. You can make any cheese that calls for it, such as direct-acidified pasta filata, ricotta (all the different kinds of it), queso blanco, etc. Using kombucha is just smokes and mirrors, the chemical dynamics are the same as using any acid, with slight differences due to kPa.
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Offline TraditionalGoats

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Re: Kombucha Cheese--medieval cheeses
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2012, 10:46:38 AM »
Hi Linuxboy,

In the blog it sounded so much more than just an acid but that would be exactly what it is.  lol 

Initially I thought that it would impart flavor to the cheese but if it did I don't think it would be that much flavor. 

Then I was thinking that perhaps it would give the cheese more probiotics but at a high temp, all the little probiotics would be killed off I think. 

Either way, I will try it and see what comes of it.  I have a ton of extra milk to play with so there is room to experiment a bit!

Tracy



Offline linuxboy

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Re: Kombucha Cheese--medieval cheeses
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2012, 10:52:47 AM »
Quote
In the blog it sounded so much more than just an acid but that would be exactly what it is.
Smokes and mirrors. If you peel away the layers, that's all it is. This is not to say that the organic chemistry and microbio are not complex. They are, and the acid and byproduct blend also are complex. This does influence flavor some.

Quote
Initially I thought that it would impart flavor to the cheese but if it did I don't think it would be that much flavor. 
It would a little. Like the difference between using wine vinegar and white distilled to make ricotta.

Quote
Then I was thinking that perhaps it would give the cheese more probiotics but at a high temp, all the little probiotics would be killed off I think.
Yep, dead.

Vinegar cheese can be really interesting. I've made washed-rind vinegar cheeses before with complex morges that have been excellent, and I've also made uncooked cheese (acid-only precipitation), like a drained yogurt before. Also decent, though bland. So there are many options here, but not more than with any acid-coagulated approach.
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