Author Topic: Staffordshire Cheese  (Read 2532 times)

Offline JeffHamm

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Staffordshire Cheese
« on: June 23, 2012, 08:09:41 PM »
Hi,

I found this make described at http://www.ukprotectedfoods.com/staffordshire-cheese-pdo/.  I've never heard of it, but it looked like an interesting, and easy, make.  It doesn't involve any cheddaring, but does require breaking the curd up a few times.  Sort of like multiple millings that I've done with Derby.  Anyway, they indicate it can be cut into quite young or aged for a year or more.  The curd is quite moist, much more so than a cheddared type, so I'm wondering how well it would age?  It's not likely to last long enough to tell me, but however long it does make it I'll let you know if it's worth trying again.  It looks fairly standard, so should be fine.  If you're new to cheesemaking, this looks to be a good starter cheese.  In my 6 1/4 inch diameter mould, it just requires 30 kg (yah, mixing my units there - 66 lbs) to get 2.15 PSI.  It's now just starting the press, with it in the pot - and the pot in the sink of warm water.  With 1800g of curd going in, I suspect it will lose a fair amount of moisture in the first few flips.  Will see.

- Jeff


Staffordshire Sunday, June 24, 2012.  Overcase, with sunny.  Air pressure:1002

10 L whole milk (Home Brand Standard; 3.1g protein/100ml 3.2g fat)
100 ml cream (Home brand)
Starter (MM100 or MM101; Flora Danica or Buttermilk would work but have LM as well as lactococcus lactis subsp.cremoris, lactocuccus lactis subsp. Lactis and lactocuccus lactis subsp. Diocetylactis) – I used 3 ice cubes buttermilk
6.5 ml Renco rennet
2.5% salt by curd weight

1)   Pasteurize milk/cream mixat 72-75.5C for 15-20 seconds (cool to 4C; skip if milk already pasturized)
2)   Warm to 28.0 C and add starter cultures (7:00 temp 24.4 C) (3 ice cubes buttermilk)
3)   Continue to warm to 32.5 – 35 C (35.0 C  7:21 am)
4)   Ripen 60-75 minutes (7:21 - 8:34; 32.5 C)
5)   Add rennet (6.5 ml Renco), ensuring temperature is in range of 31-33 C (8:42:30 temp 32.5 C)
6)   Floc time 8:55:00 = 12m 30sec 3 x floc = 37m 30sec cut time 9:20:00
(NOTE: in original info, rennet to cut is described as 45-50 minutes in one place, but in same document as 35-45 minutes)
7)   Cut curds (size not specificed 1 cm cubes); heal 15 min (9:30 – 9:45)
8)   Keep temp at 30-32 C and stir for 40 minutes (9:45 - 9:25  ; 30.9 C)
9)   Allow curds to settle 30 minutes (9:25 - 9:55)
10)   Remove whey (whey off requires 35 minutes in large batch, so settle for 30 min)
11)   Break curds every 15 minutes over 45 minute period (11:30 & 12:00 & 12:40)
12)   Mill to thumbnail size and add salt (2.5% by curd weight curds - 1800g x 0.025 – 45.0g)
13)   Mix salt by turning curds 4 times (more will dry out curds too much)
14)   Move to cloth lined mould, press at 2 PSI over night at 21-25 C) (10 kg = 0.72 PSI for 30 min1:00-1:30 , then 20 kg 30 minutes 1:30 = 2:00, then 30 kg = 2.15 PSI 2:00 - 4:26 am; 1414g ; 15.5 cm x 6.6 cm = 1245 cm3 = 1.14g/cm3
15)   Age at 7-10 C, turn daily for a week, then weekly
16)   Age 2-4 weeks (mild) or up to a year.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2012, 01:16:19 PM by JeffHamm »
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2012, 11:43:02 AM »
Hi,

Well, up early at 4:25 am, so decided to have a look.  It's been in the press for 14 hours or so, which should be enough.  Knit's good, and the cheese weighs in at 1414g.  A bit heavier than some others I've made, but this will be due to retained moisture.  Over the next few weeks it will dry out, and eventually settle somewhere around 1 kg.  Will probably give it 4 to 5 weeks before tasting.

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2012, 05:25:06 PM »
Beautiful knit and cheese. 4 to 5 weeks seems a little young. Is that normal?

I was trying to read up on this cheese and I ran across this piece:

"Staffordshire Cheese is unique and has a strong identity based on its taste and texture due to the distinctive nature of the cows diet, the mixture of starter cultures used and the size of the cloth bound cheese."

Seems like a very terroir-based cheese style. I will be curious to see how this turns out.

-Boofer-

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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2012, 06:45:46 PM »
Hi Boofer,

The cultures listed in the link I posted are " lactococcus lactis subsp.cremoris, lactocuccus lactis subsp. Lactis and lactocuccus lactis subsp. Diocetylactis.", which I think calls for MM-100 or 101.  I only have Flora Danica and Buttermilk.  I should pick up another meso culture at some point.

And, 2 - 4 weeks is young, but then, Caerphilly is ready in that time frame.  I think Wensledale goes to market around 4 weeks as well, but I could be mistaken on that.

A lot of the local UK cheeses are influenced by the cow's diet on local flora.  Wensleydale is another that is influenced by it.  While the same can be said for any cheese, I think it's more critical to smaller production runs.  If everyone is making cheese X then "cheese X" will become characterized by what is common over a wide variety of locations (i.e. texture, culture, aging, etc conditions).  When a cheese is produced in one location, then the influence of the local milk becomes part of it's characterization.  So, while I can't hope to truly reproduce Staffordshire (or Wensleydale) with my store bought New Zealand milk, I can dream. :)

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2012, 07:41:39 PM »
Since you have a hand in it, it will no doubt be quite memorable.

I'll be watching with keen anticipation.  :D

-Boofer-
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2012, 02:10:43 AM »
LOL!  Being memorable is not always a good thing, he says as he thinks back on that bad burrito!  It's drying out nicely so far.  Be a few days yet before caving though.

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2012, 09:16:36 AM »
ROFL. Yet another reason to check into the forum, Jeff, to see what you're up to. After all, someone has to check up on you.  ;)

(There are no doubt a lot of folks here who do just that.)

-Boofer-
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2012, 02:24:32 AM »
Hi,

Ok, it's comming up on 4 weeks, and it was stated in the information I found that Staffordshire can be eaten at 2-4 weeks for a "mild" version, although it can be aged up to a year.  This one now weighs 1222g, and the dimentions have reduced to 15.3 x 6.0 cm, for a density of 1.1 g/ccm.  I quite like Caerphilly at 3 weeks, so I thought I would try this one out for comparison. 

Well, it doesn't have caerphilly's tang, which is the appeal of that as a young cheese.  This one, even when left to warm up to room temp, is just bland, and a bit too salty (I would cut this down to 2% of the weight, rather than 2.5%).  Basically, it seems to me this one just hasn't come into it's own yet.  I think it will age quite nicely though.  The internal paste looks good.  The natural rind, mostly geo, does impart some nice earthy and mushroomy type tones, but only near the rind.  These flavours haven't penetrated into the centre (I tend to lay the wedge on it's side, and slice it left to right, so you get wee triangles of cheese.  This allows me to sample the flavour profile as you move from rind towards the centre.  Anyway, this has lots of potential I think, but it's not a substitute for caerphilly in terms of the "ready quick" makes.  I have another one, which I'll definately age out a few months before cutting into it.  This one I'll probably cut into two pieces and bag them.  I've got a wensleydale that was made March 10th that should be ready to cut into, so I'm not without cheese. 

- Jeff
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Offline george (MaryJ)

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2012, 04:35:39 AM »
This one, even when left to warm up to room temp, is just bland

Funny, Jeff, that's exactly how I felt about the one Wensleydale I made.  I sampled it at 4 weeks per recipe and it was booooooring.  Tried it again a few weeks later and it wasn't boring any more, it tasted more like something that was totally not ready.  So I re-bagged it all, tossed it in the cave, and someday when I'm bored I'll pull a piece out again.   ;)  It was made mid-March, so there's still hope for it, I guess.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2012, 02:13:25 PM »
Hi George,

I'll probably cut into my March Wensleydale this weekend.  It's a new make for me (I've made Wensleydale twice before useing a different procedure; this one I found on the web posted by a small commercial dairy.  Had to fill in a few bits, but it was pretty complete).  I'll post on how that turned out when I taste it.  I think this one will need at least another month, probably two, before it starts to behave.  I think I'll age the uncut one out for quite some time.  May leave it to to develope a natural rind and not wax or bag it, just to see how it goes.

- Jeff
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2012, 05:13:34 PM »
Hi George,

I cut into my Wensleydale that was made March 10, and it had great flavour.  I would suggest trying yours about now too.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline george (MaryJ)

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2012, 06:22:16 AM »
Will do!  Need to decide what this week's cheese make will be, anyway so might as well throw the Wensleydale into the hat also, if it warrants it.  Will let you know - thanks, Jeff!
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2012, 03:31:47 PM »
One of the two halves of this that I've vac bagged started to get a bit of blue mould developing on one corner, so I took it out, cut off a wedge to remove the mould, and re-bagged it.  It's still a bit salty, but improving.  Still not a strong flavour, so it needs a lot more aging yet, but the flavour is developing and this could be a nice surprise in six to eight months.  There's not a lot of flavour yet though, just sort of hints and promises at the moment.  One day, we'll see how truthful those are.

- Jeff
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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2012, 03:55:14 PM »
I'm glad to see your still having fun with experimental cheeses!  Half the fun is not having a clue as to what is going to happen!  :)
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2012, 08:23:52 PM »
Yah, it's fun to see what develops.  A lot more fun when they turn out really tasty, a bit less fun when they're just sort of ... meh.  This one is still sort of meh right now, but I'm hoping it will become funner later.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.