Author Topic: Staffordshire Cheese  (Read 1910 times)

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2012, 10:01:28 PM »
I've made my share of duds...I like to dwell on the happy accidents!  Looking forward to hearing about this cheese in 6 months.
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2012, 01:46:30 PM »
I had to change the vac. bag on one of the pieces of this.  And, since it was out of the bag, had a taste.  It's now developed into a nice mild, creamy cheese.  Very smooth texture and taste.  Not at all salty.  So, I've left this piece out to be consumed and will age the rest a few more months.

- Jeff
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #17 on: September 04, 2012, 01:56:40 PM »
Nice! How did you get the smooth rind on it? Did you press in warm whey?

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #18 on: September 04, 2012, 03:17:40 PM »
Hi bbracken677,

I didn't press it under whey, put did press it in the pot, so put the curds in a cloth lined mould, put the mould in a pot, put the pot in the sink with warm water and press; this helps keep the curds warm while pressing for the first hour or so.  After that, it's just at room temp for the night.

- Jeff
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #19 on: September 04, 2012, 03:29:09 PM »
So just warming the curds for an hour or so would do the trick?  Nice!


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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2012, 06:37:21 PM »
Yes, pressing in the pot (I believe Sailor introduced this idea to the boards) is a good way to help get a better knit.  If I were to make this one again, I think it needs to expel more moisture (more stirring or cooking, etc) and the curds needed to get a bit stickier before moulding.  Might experiment with it a bit more at some point.

- Jeff
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #21 on: September 08, 2012, 01:24:05 AM »
I can report that this does melt, and makes a pretty good toasted cheese sandwhich.  So, I think with a bit of tweaking this could work out nicely.  I think it basically needed more stirring and cooking, but it's coming right.

- Jeff
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2012, 12:22:44 PM »
Opened the other half today.  It was wet in the bag, so I wiped it down.  It has a "fruity" flavour that seems to occur if the cheese is stored too moist.  I'm hoping it will dissipate as it airs out in the cave for a few days.  It still has a very creamy texture, and one can detect some promises underneath this odd flavour.  It will be interesting to compare how the 2nd one turns out as it was aged with a natural rind.  Anyway, I think this is a make that can be improved upon and that this one is just not the best example of what could be done.

- Jeff

P.S.  Hmmm, I cut some more of this this morning and let it sit out for a few hours now.  The flavour is much better than it was last night.  Still room for some improvement, but with a few more days of breathing, this may just come right after all.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2012, 06:06:29 PM by JeffHamm »
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Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2012, 12:57:39 PM »
Ok, it seems air this out has really helped it.  Had friends over for a BBQ last night and put out a cheese board, which included this one.  And, someone picked this as their favorite (and it was up against my first wash rind tomme, a 1 year old cheshire, and a bought cheese with cumin seeds).  Two of us liked the tomme and the cheshire as our very close #1 and 2.  Also, I find the flavour is much improved as well.  There's something about the taste of a cheese that has been long in the bag or wax that seems a bit wrong, but then it goes away with airing.  The cheese equivalent of musty.

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #24 on: October 29, 2012, 08:49:34 AM »
Congrats on your tastings, Jeff.

Yeah, I've had a few of those cheeses that get wet in the bag and then the rind turns whitish. A lot of opening the bag, drying the cheese, and either resealing or replacing the bag. My Cheddar #2 is like that. It has had time to dry out since it was made, but it still sweats in the bag. It's cousin, #1, made just a bit earlier doesn't have that "sweating in the bag" problem.

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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #25 on: October 29, 2012, 09:42:00 AM »
Great job on the cheese, Jeff!  I hope to have some cheeses for a cheese plate for family to taste around Christmas.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #26 on: October 29, 2012, 01:11:56 PM »
Thanks guys! 

And Boofer, yes, the rind was very white, and softish/crumbly.  Cheese sweat is what it is, and it goes a bit sweetly fermented, which is producing the fruity flavours that I detect.  It does fade, but I have to remember to take that into account the next time I plan on opening a cheese.  When I opened this half earlier, it was pretty much a dud.  Edible, but not one I would call a huge success.  Now, however, it's much better and, though a bit mild for my tastes, is a good result.  It melts exceptionally well (I made a cheese omlette with it the other day), and has enough flavour to use for such things.  Would probably make a good cheese sauce for mac and cheese, etc. 

And bbracken677, I'm sure your cheese plate will be a huge success.  I should have taken a photo of mine; next time.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.