Author Topic: Baby Gouda with mustard seed  (Read 2065 times)

Offline hoeklijn

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Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« on: June 24, 2012, 01:49:03 PM »
My cheese making is about divided in two parts: My experiments with whites and blues and the cheeses that are also appreciated by wife and children.
Yesterday it was time again for what they call "normal cheese" and I decided to give Gouda with mustard seed a go. It was also the first time that I used one of the cultures that I ordered recently in Germany:

   20 ltr raw milk
        1/2 tsp Alpha culture, that is:
              2/3 Lactococcus Cremoris and Lactococcus Lactis
              1/3 Lactococcus Diacetilactis and Leuconostoc Cremoris
   1 3/4 tsp saltpeter
        40 gram yellow and black mustard seed
   1/4 tsp CaCl
   1 1/4 tsp liquid veal rennet in 60ml cold water

   08:43 - Milk was collected from the farm during milking time was still at 33C
   09:33 - added culture at 31C, let it rehydrate for 5 minutes and stirred.
   09:39 - cover vat and let the milk rest
   10:24 - added saltpeter and stirred well
   10:26 - added rennet and stirred well
   10:27 - let the milk coagulate. Floc time just under 10 min, decided to go for 3.5 multiplyer.
   11:02 - Cut the curd into cubes of 10 mm and stirred for 15 minutes
   11:20 - Cover vat and let it rest. Temp now 29C
   11:39 - Remove 1/3 of the whey, and water till temp is 36C, stir for half an hour
   12:09 - Let the curd rest
   12:15 - Remove whey, and warm the moulds with the whey, mix with mustard seed
        12:40 - Let the filled moulds drain upside down
   13:02 - Press with 5 kg
        14:10 - Turn and press with5 kg
        15:00 - Turn and press with 10 kg       
        23:00 - In a 18% brine for 10 hours
       
Added some pictures, both wheels in the brine, on the scale after brining (both more than 1 kg) and the two of them drying...
- Herman -


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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2012, 02:14:08 PM »
Very nice looking cheeses! Now I remember why I bought a 1 lb bag of mustard seeds!

Offline Boofer

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2012, 05:06:20 PM »
Is that the normal amount of saltpeter that you add for that amount of milk? Seems like a lot.

I like that effect you get with the two colors of mustard seed. I've never had cheese with mustard seed...how does it taste?

Good looking cheeses, Herman. Seems like we share a similar situation...my wife doesn't prefer a lot of the cheeses I make. This morning she cut the rind off the wedge of Reblochon I gave her.  :(  She doesn't care for the blues either. Too bad...more for me!  8)

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Offline margaretsmall

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2012, 06:01:25 PM »
What's the reason for adding saltpeter? (I don't think I even know what it is!)
Margaret

Offline Boofer

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2012, 08:02:48 PM »
Saltpeter can either be sodium nitrate or potassium nitrate.

Here's one answer to your question:

"Sodium nitrate

Introduction

Sodium nitrate solution is a purified and standardised solution of the salt NaNO3. It is a clear, colourless product and suitable for foodstuffs.

Application

Silage for cows sometimes contains butyric acid bacteria (Clostridium tyrobutyricum). These harmless bacteria can end up in the cheese milk through the cow and cause cheese flaws.

Pasteurising the cheese milk destroys the growing (vegetative) C. tyrobutyricum bacteria. However, the resting (dormant) cells, also known as spores, are not exterminated. Ultimately, the spores can germinate in the cheese into vegetative cells and subsequently form CO2 and butyric acid. During this butyric acid fermentation, cracks appear in the cheese along with an aberrant and unwanted aroma. Brine and nitrite inhibit the germination of the butyric acid bacteria spores.

The salt absorbed by the cheese during the brine bath inhibits the germination of the spores. However, this salt absorption is a slow process and does not offer sufficient protection against butyric acid fermentation during the brine bath as well as during the early stages of ripening. Adding Sodium nitrate halts the butyric acid fermentation process. Sodium nitrate is converted into nitrite by the enzyme xanthine-oxydase and the nitrite stops the germination of butyric acid spores. The nitrite is slowly reduced in the cheese. CSK supplies sodium nitrate in liquid and powder form."

This condition is also known as "late-blowing".

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Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2012, 01:36:49 AM »
Is that the normal amount of saltpeter that you add for that amount of milk? Seems like a lot.
-Boofer-

When it is added before the rennet, 40 ml per 100 liter milk is recommended. That is 8 ml per 20 liter = ~1 3/4 teaspoon.
I only add it to my Gouda type cheeses. When too much saltpeter is added, this will be visible as a pink line between the rind and the cheese, which I never had.

My saltpeter is sodium nitrate and because it is a well known and accepted addition to the Gouda type cheeses, it is sold here in web shops per liter for a couple of euros.
Contamination of the milk with buteric acid bacteria happens from the outside. According to the farmer of the cheese farm where I buy my milk, the only link with silage is that when silage is too wet, the menure will be wet and the change of "outside" contamination of the milk/milking machine is bigger. For that, they take care for a drier silage and they also feed corn together with the silage, which will result in a drier menure. And of course it is important for them to work clean. But nevertheless they also add saltpeter, just as a precaution...
- Herman -

Offline tnbquilt

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2012, 07:42:43 AM »
I like the molds that make the edges of the cheese rounded. I need to buy some of those. I was thinking of making Gouda with mustard seeds too, so I hunted this down. Lovely pictures.
Tammy

Offline Schnecken Slayer

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2012, 12:03:14 PM »
That looks interesting. I also like the effect with the different coloured seeds.

Did you boil the mustard seeds first?
-Bill
One day I will add something here...

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2012, 02:13:55 PM »
No really boiled them. Had them in a tea-egg for 10 minutes above a bit of boiling water. Remaining water (about 50 ml) was added to the milk.
- Herman -

Offline botanist

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2012, 02:38:39 AM »
Beautiful cheeses, hoeklijn!  I love the 2 colors of mustard seed.  Have a look at this one featured in Culture magazine
http://www.culturecheesemag.com/featured_cheeses/12/08/2012
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!


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Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2012, 08:36:21 AM »
Thanks for the compliment, Botanist. The only pressed goat cheese I made so far is Cabra al Vino, but I certainly have to try others as well, like I do with the several types of Gouda I make from cow milk...
- Herman -

Offline botanist

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2012, 01:32:07 PM »
Herman, since I use my goats' milk, all my cheeses are made with it, regardless of what the original milk is for the traditional cheeses.  Anyway, I find that I prefer Beemster's gouda-type cheese more than cow's milk goudas, and even more than my own, since the milk they use is more 'goaty'.  I was disappointed when I found that the breed of goat I have gives the mildest tasting goat milk.  Most people prefer it, since it tastes almost like cow's milk, but I was expecting it to taste like Toggenburg milk, since both are alpine breeds.  I was wrong, wrong, wrong, and not happy about that :-\, but I do love my goaties and how they look, so I'll just have to get over it.  I'm not going to keep 2 breeds of goat (but if I did, for sure the second one would be cute little Nigerian dwarf goatlets, and with milk typically at double the fat content of most standard breeds, yowsa! it's like Jersey).
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!

Offline tnbquilt

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2012, 03:33:58 PM »
I had some Beemster's Gouda last summer. I went to the American Cheese Festival which is a competition between businesses but they sell tickets to the public for the tasting after the competition. They were selling grab bags at the door for $25 when you left and I got a big piece of Beemster's gouda. It was great. I think it was the best thing in the bag, although there were 3 or 4 other really good cheeses as well.
Tammy

Offline hoeklijn

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #13 on: December 13, 2012, 09:55:46 AM »
Hi Tammy, nice to hear such a story. Beemster is here sold in supermarkets as "just another Gouda". But when I buy cheese in the supermarket, this is one of my favorites  :). It has just a bit more taste, specially the more mature types.
- Herman -

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Re: Baby Gouda with mustard seed
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2012, 02:45:48 PM »
I had some Beemster's Gouda last summer. I went to the American Cheese Festival which is a competition between businesses but they sell tickets to the public for the tasting after the competition. They were selling grab bags at the door for $25 when you left and I got a big piece of Beemster's gouda. It was great. I think it was the best thing in the bag, although there were 3 or 4 other really good cheeses as well.

You were lucky, then!  It's not always easy to find and is one of my favorite cheeses.
before goats, store bought milk = chevre & feta, with goats, infinite possibilities, goatie love, lotta work cleaning out the barn!