Author Topic: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese  (Read 1450 times)

Online JeffHamm

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My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« on: July 01, 2012, 02:16:44 AM »
Hi,

I picked up a 3 pack of "Mad Millies" MW3 culture, which is just lactococcus lactis subsp.cremoris, lactocuccus lactis subsp. Lactis.  Doesn't have the Diocetylactis, which Staffordshire calls for, but this is all they had at the shop (it's a beer/wine brew shop, with some cheese stuff - not a lot of cultures available here actually).  Anyway, although I just made my first one of these last week, I thought I would give it another go.  I ended up using 11 litres rather than my usual 10, but the curds were lighter than the previous make (I was better at expelling the why during the stirring I think).

Anyway, will post a photo tomorrow when it's out of the press.


Staffordshire Sunday, July 1, 2012.  Overcast.  Air pressure:1010 20 C

11 L whole milk (Budget Blue TOP; 3.2g protein/100ml 3.3g fat)
100 ml cream (Home brand)
Starter (MM100 or MM101; Flora Danica or Buttermilk would work but have LM as well as lactococcus lactis subsp.cremoris, lactocuccus lactis subsp. Lactis and lactocuccus lactis subsp. Diocetylactis) – I used1 packet Mad Millie MW3 (cremoris & Lactis only)
7.15 ml Renco rennet
2.5% salt by curd weight
¼ tsp CaCl

1)   Pasteurize milk/cream mixat 72-75.5C for 15-20 seconds (cool to 4C; skip if milk already pasturized)
2)   Warm to 28.0 C and add starter cultures (8:00 temp 27.6 C)
3)   Continue to warm to 32.5 – 35 C (33.2 C  8:12 am)
4)   Ripen 60-75 minutes (8:12 - 9:20; ??.? C)
5)   Add CaCl2 (1/4 tsp, 50%) rennet (7.15 ml Renco), ensuring temperature is in range of 31-33 C (9:23:00 temp 33.1 C)
6)   Floc time 9:34:45 = 11m 45sec 3 x floc = 35m 15sec cut time 9:58:15
(NOTE: in original info, rennet to cut is described as 45-50 minutes in one place, but in same document as 35-45 minutes, so either 3.2-3.5x or 3x flocs)
7)   Cut curds (size not specificed 1 cm cubes); heal 15 min (10:07-10:22)
8)   Keep temp at 30-32 C and stir for 40 minutes (10:22 - 11:02  ; 33.3 C)
9)   Allow curds to settle 30 minutes (11:02-11:40 )
10)   Remove whey (whey off requires 35 minutes in large batch, so settle for 30 min above; done 11:48; placed 3 litres of whey on top of “sacked” curds to help expel whey)
11)   Break curds every 15 minutes over 45 minute period (12:03 & 12:30 & 12:55)
12)   Mill to thumbnail size and add salt (2.5% by curd weight curds - 1724g x 0.025 – 43.1g)
13)   Mix salt by turning curds 4 times (more will dry out curds too much)
14)   Move to cloth lined mould, press  at 2 PSI over night at 21-25 C) (10 kg = 0.72 PSI for 30 min 1:15-1:45 , then 20 kg 30 minutes 1:45 -2:20, then 30 kg = 2.15 PSI 2:20 - 5:45 am.  1440g 15.5 x 6.3 cm  = 1188 cm3 = 1.21g/cm3
15)   Age at 7-10 C, turn daily for a week, then weekly
16)   Age 2-4 weeks (mild) or up to a year.

made 230g ricotta.

- Jeff
« Last Edit: July 01, 2012, 12:54:28 PM by JeffHamm »
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2012, 01:00:02 PM »
Hi,

Well, it was lighter than the first make going into the press, but after pressing, it's heavier (now weighs in at 1440g, while the first make was at 1414).  The knit is not quite as good as the first one, but the pressing room was quite cold last night, which I think was the problem.  Still, it's a decent knit overall.  As soon as I find the card reader I'll post a photo, but until then, you'll just have to trust me.  Oh, and that bridge I had for sale, yah, I need the reader for that photo too, but just sign here ...

- Jeff

p.s.  Ok, the joke would have been funnier if I hadn't found the card reader immediately after.  Honest, it would have been really funny ... just cover the photo and read it again. 
« Last Edit: July 01, 2012, 01:33:40 PM by JeffHamm »
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Boofer

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2012, 08:58:51 PM »
Cracking up.  :D

Crazy on the Staffordshire, Jeff. I was kinda of tempted to make another Maasdam and coat it with Herman's magical plastic coating for the rind protection, but then remembered I didn't have any idea whether the first one of the two tasted good enough. ::) So, I made another Reblochon instead 'cause I know they come out pretty tasty.

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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2012, 02:21:36 AM »
Hi Boofer,

Yah, I know what you mean.  I made 3 wheels of Montasio before I tasted the first one!  It's wonderful grated over spagetti, and such, but the lipase makes it a bit strong for just snacking on.  I've not used 1/4 of the first wheel yet, so I think I'll have montasio reserves for some time.  Mind you, that just means they are all aging away nicely.  It would be a bad thing if I didn't like it.  The Staffordshire though is a pretty safe bet.  I've bagged the first one (it's only a week old) as I want to see if I can keep it more or less "rindless".  I usually let them develop a natural rind, but that would be wrong for this one I think.  Will see how it goes though.  It may just weep whey into the bag.  But that's easy to fix.  Apparently this can be aged, so I may age the 2nd one out for a few months.  The first has retained too much moisture for long aging, so it will be a good one to try as a young version. 

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2012, 08:40:18 AM »
I did two Maasdams. One went into a loose vacuum bag at the start of the Warm Period and has a nude rind. (Can I say that without getting into trouble?  ::)) That technique helped to ward off intruders.

The next Maasdam I did, shortly after the first, developed a beautiful natural rind in the Warm Period (had to fight off nasties that wanted some for themselves!) and then I vacuum-bagged it.

Of course after the Warm Period they both went into the cave. Same recipe, similar ingredients, different rind development. Should be interesting what that gives me after they've aged. As a matter of fact, the first (the nudie ;)) is coming up for cutting/tasting mid-month, alongside my Double Gloucester, for my Dad's 89th birthday. He loves cheese. I hope these turn out good.

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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2012, 01:45:40 PM »
Happy birthday to your Dad.  I'm sure the cheeses will turn out great.  That double Gloucester looks really good.  I keep meaning to try that make, and will at one point.  Anyway, will see how the bagged one holds up.  I suspect it's still giving off gas/moisture and the bag will inflate or get wet.  It's only just over a week old and usually the bagged ones seem to lose their vaccuum (but I've decided it's gas, maybe CO2, that is just natually given off, but not eye formation strength gas).

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2012, 12:47:56 PM »
Hi,

Just a photo update on this one.  It's now at 1250g, so over almost 2 months it has lost less than 200g.  That's pretty minimal for me.  The natural rind seems to be doing well.  I brush it back every now and then, when the wild blue starts looking blue.  I've a 2nd wheel of this, cut into two parts, which is vac. bagged.  That one, of course, is very clean, though a bit of blue keeps showing up on one of the pieces which I need to open, tidy up, and re-bag.  Anyway, it will be interesting to compare these two when they are well aged.

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline bbracken677

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2012, 07:56:38 PM »
Nice job!  I have severe patience issues...when I make my first cheddars I will be wanting to age them well into next year (I much prefer sharp and extra sharp) but i know I will be wanting a taste before they get that old.
Temptation is great and the flesh is weak...specially if the cheese smells really good! 

A cheese to you for patience!  haha

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2012, 08:10:22 PM »
Thanks.  I made a bunch of cheeses a while back that are all aging away nicely.  Next year I'm going to have a bunch of cheese over a year old.  I'm making a caerphilly now.  It's ready in 3 or 4 weeks, and provides me with cheese to help the others age.  Butterkase is another one that's edible fairly soon after making, so again, another good one to make and have at the ready to ward off temptation (i.e. give into it, but in a controlled way).

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Boofer

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2012, 01:16:06 AM »
I have severe patience issues...when I make my first cheddars I will be wanting to age them well into next year (I much prefer sharp and extra sharp) but i know I will be wanting a taste before they get that old.
Temptation is great and the flesh is weak...specially if the cheese smells really good! 
Here's a possible solution for your weakness:
  • Make a couple Cheddars (or similar long-aged cheese styles in the Cheddar family).
  • Shove them to the back of your cave, remembering to turn them every so often.
  • To distract you from going after the preemie(?) Cheddars...
    • Make a couple washed-rind, blue, or white-rind cheeses.
    • The effort required to tend to these cheeses will keep your mind and hands
      occupied so you don't feel the need to disturb your Cheddar babies.
  • Another problem solved...  8)
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Offline bbracken677

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2012, 03:31:25 PM »
haha...I like that solution ; )

Cheddar will be end of next week, more than likely!

Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2012, 04:16:57 PM »
Hi bbracken677,

I forgot to mention, search the forum for Lancashire.  It's another cheddar type cheese that is quite good relatively quickly (2 months or so) and it's not intended for long aging.  The best cheddar type I've made yet was my most recent Wensleydale (my 3rd make).  I highly recommend that, but I also aged it out 4.5 months, so it's not quick.  Had some more yesterday, and it's still fantastic and heads and tails above any of my other makes for cheddar types - huge burst of smooth buttery cheddar flavour ... ahem ...

But, Caerphilly is, to me, the best "ready quick" hard cheese that I've found.  Butterkase, at least what I've been making, seems to require some extended aging and then it comes into its own.  I've not tried the moister 5x make yet, so that may age and be ready quicker. 

There are some really nice semi-lactics as well, and they are very quick too.  And, as Boofer has suggested, some washed rind or mould ripened projects can keep you occupied as well. 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline bbracken677

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2012, 05:16:43 PM »
Thanks!  I like the suggestions, since english cheddars are a favorite of mine. I do plan on staying busy making more cheeses...probably will be on a one a week schedule.

On my plate for making will be cheddar, caerphilly, (currently making a butterkase), colby, and...I am sure there is another that isnt coming to mind. Thankfully I make lists cause I need the extra RAM memory   lol

Online JeffHamm

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #13 on: September 21, 2012, 01:36:54 PM »
Hi,

This one seems to be doing quite well.  Gave it another good brushing today.  It weighs in at 1156g and has a really nice smell of hazelnuts.  I think I'm taking this out to 6 months or so, then will test it out. 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.

Offline Boofer

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Re: My 2nd Staffordshire Cheese
« Reply #14 on: September 22, 2012, 01:18:04 AM »
Man, that looks great! Hazelnuts? It kind of looks like you added hazelnuts to it. Amazing rind...so colorful.

A cheese for your natural rind maintenance.... 8)

-Boofer-
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