Author Topic: My First Tomme  (Read 8767 times)

Offline Tiarella

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #60 on: September 18, 2012, 06:27:11 AM »
Yes thank you, that's a big help.  I just wonder what level of rind development it needs so that all those molds won't impact it in a negative way. I think it's developed a decent rind now so maybe I can just wait and see.  And really, just brush it back every week or two????  Seems like it'll get awfully moldy in between those. 

Oh, you mentioned, or at least I think it was you, that a Manchego should be kept clean but mine is moldy and has a lot of little grooves from the mold pattern.  I have some brushes arriving shortly that I can use to brush it off but how on earth can I keep a cheese mold free when I want that?  With the Manchego, should I oil it after brushing it?  Or should I try to get the mold totally off of it by washing with a wash mixture containing something like close infusion or grapefruit seed extract to actually kill the mold and then dry and oil it? 

Thank you.......


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Offline iratherfly

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #61 on: September 21, 2012, 12:56:15 AM »
I would brush the Manchego clean with a damp no-lint cloth and maybe a bit of salt. Dry it well and then give it a coating of olive oil. Repeat the coating a couple of days later and maintain in the future if you think it needs more.

For the Tomme, all this mold is normal. That's how Tomme de Savoie is being made. If you want to reduce mold growth just reduce humidity!  The mold won't grow endlessly. It relies on nutrients so if there is nothing for it to eat except other mold it would slow down. It also  needs air and ample moisture. High salinity and high acidity slow it down too (and eventually kill it). You can toss some coarse salt and rub with a bery damb no-lint cloth, the salt will kill or at least slow some of this down.

Online JeffHamm

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #62 on: September 28, 2012, 01:26:32 AM »
In just over a week this will reach the 12 week mark, so 3 months.  Some friends will be back in town as well, and we'll probably have them over, so that might be a good time to try it.  Through the bag it feels quite soft, so I'm very curious to see how the paste is.  When it cracked, it appeared to glisten and look very soft and yum.  I'm hoping that is still the case, and that the taste is as good as the texture implies.

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Offline Boofer

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #63 on: September 28, 2012, 01:28:42 AM »
Looking forward to seeing this when you open it, Jeff. I'm keen with anticipation. :D

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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #64 on: October 05, 2012, 05:11:51 PM »
Hi,

Well, it was about 3 months (12 weeks) this weekend, so I decided to try this one out.  It was a bit sticky in the bag, and the linens were obviously still a bit active (the aroma gave them away).  Some mould was growing in the crack of doom as well (photo 1), but I gave it a wash under the tap, and brushed it with the nail brush, and it's cleaned up a bit (2nd photo).  Cut into it, and it's really creamy.  A very very moist, almost cream cheese, paste.  This is such a soft paste that the cheese is sort of collapsing on itself (you can see how it bulges in the photos).  The linens have definately flavoured the paste all the way in though.  I cut a sliver, which was a bit tricky as the paste is quite "sticky" it is so moist, and tasted the section from the middle, and there is that meaty b.linens flavour through and through!  Not too stong, but quite nice.  So, definately an edilbe result but the structure of it is not quite right.  I think my 2nd make will be better.  In part, this one has remained in a bag and so it couldn't lose moisture as it aged.  Anyway, a success.  Will see how it goes with with everyone else.

- Jeff
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Offline Tomer1

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #65 on: October 05, 2012, 07:19:00 PM »
Did you not cook the curds?  how did you end up with such a moist tomme?  Even my unpressed (just fliped in the mould) wasnt as moist.
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #66 on: October 05, 2012, 07:45:29 PM »
I'm not entirely sure what happened, but I'm thinking I should have cooked longer and stirred with more vigor.  This was very soft out of the mould, and has never firmed up.  It has a layer about 1/8-1/4 inch in that is just ib the solid side of liquid once it warms up.  The 2nd one I've made is much firmer, so we'll see how that one goes.

- Jeff
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Offline anutcanfly

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #67 on: October 06, 2012, 11:57:42 AM »
It looks quite yummy from over here.  How long does a cheese that moist stay good in the fridge?
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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #68 on: October 06, 2012, 12:08:36 PM »
Hi anut,

I don't know.  It's aged 3 months, and I've re-bagged 1/2 of it.  The other 1/2 we'll try eat over the next few weeks.  I don't think  it will  go   off b efore  we can eat it :)    !

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #69 on: October 07, 2012, 09:20:11 AM »
Oh no! Tragedy!  :(

I had a Gouda similar to that. It started out somewhat firm, but then seemingly continued to ripen...until it became quite oozy...like a Brie. Perhaps I washed the curds a little too much and they became a little too wet.

Eh, you'll do better with the next one, Jeff.

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Online JeffHamm

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #70 on: October 07, 2012, 12:04:12 PM »
Hi Boofer,

Well, it's a tragedy if you think of it as a tomme.  But, it tastes really good and has been a hit with everyone who has tried it, so I just call it a soft washed rind cheese. :)  So, at least it didn't have to get pitched.

- Jeff
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Offline Boofer

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #71 on: October 07, 2012, 12:29:59 PM »
Well then, kudos to you, Jeff, for inventing a new cheese style. ;)

Yeah, I've had a couple of those that didn't quite turn out the way that I had intended, but they were pretty tasty anyway. I few that were downright disgusting. :P

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Offline Tiarella

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #72 on: October 07, 2012, 06:20:20 PM »
My Brie batch that got left out on my workbench for 5 days while I was sick was a case of "truly disgusting" and got tossed. Too bad.  They looked SO good, even the paste was soft and creamy and looked right on target to ripen.  The smell?  oh my gosh, will not even try to describe since it's always dinner time somewhere and I'd hate to ruin someone's experience. 

Offline anutcanfly

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #73 on: October 08, 2012, 11:30:53 AM »
I did that once.  5 days in 100 degree weather.  I got lucky though and it just accelerated the aging.  Tastes like it was aged 8 months when the actual aging was 2 months. 
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Offline Tiarella

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Re: My First Tomme
« Reply #74 on: October 08, 2012, 08:58:10 PM »
Oooh I'm glad you had a good outcome.  I'm afraid I just had another lapsed attention attack.  This time a batch of chevre that i'd put in molds to drain, then unmolded and ashed/salted and left to drain.  I don't even have solid make notes on this batch but I don't think they have the PC or Geo in them so I'm not sure what I thought I was doing when I did the ash/salt thing. sigh.  Too much milk, too many batches of cheese and it all runs together.