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CHEESE TYPE BOARDS (for Cheese Lovers and Cheese Makers) => FRESH LACTIC ACID COAGULATED - Normally Whey Removed => Topic started by: CheeseSnipe on July 09, 2011, 01:03:17 PM

Title: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on July 09, 2011, 01:03:17 PM
I've got a steady supply of goat's milk now and I'm looking to branch out on flavors for my fresh goat cheese. So far I've done things like Herbs d Provence, honey lavender, scallions parsley, etc.

Wondering if any of you have some killer combos. I'm open to unusual (curry, thai spices, Cajun, etc)  A)
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Tomer1 on July 09, 2011, 01:47:14 PM
You might want to make pesto or sun dried tomato filled rolls or balls.
Its very nice when you cut into it with green\red in the middle,
You want to season your cheese with salt and black pepper so its not bland,
Deeping it in olive oil for presentation is an added bonus.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: smilingcalico on July 09, 2011, 06:50:27 PM
Curry is a great one.  Try also dried fruit and honey along with some spices.  You can either let the fruit soak up moisture from the cheese, or rehydrate first. 
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: stoneyridge on July 11, 2011, 10:49:05 AM
I add ham and green onion.  It's more of a cheese-ball type, but it's extremely popular.  To 1 lb. of Chevre, add about 4 ounces of finely chopped ham and about 4 green onions (scallions), also chopped very fine.

Dill and garlic is my personal favorite.  Basil and sun-dried tomato drizzled with olive oil is good, too.

D
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on July 12, 2011, 01:38:59 PM
Thanks all. I'm going to be flavoring today! In the past I've added the herbs directly to the milk before the cultures and rennet which makes for an amazing infused flavor. But since I made an extra large batch I'm going to just coat these individually and let them soak for a while.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: velward on July 12, 2011, 01:48:08 PM
I layer mine in the draining stage with Good Seasons Italian Dressing  mix. Just put half the cheese in the cheesecloth or strainer or whatever you use, sprinkle half of the package of dried mis on , then ladle the other half of the cheese, sprinkle with remaining mix. Let it drain. MMMM
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Gürkan Yeniçeri on July 12, 2011, 05:46:40 PM
I like the taste of japanese miso soup and I discovered that it is available as a sauce in the market. I wonder how that would work in or around the cheese.

In the address http://www.fuchu.or.jp/~kanemitu/misomaking.htm (http://www.fuchu.or.jp/~kanemitu/misomaking.htm) it explains how to make miso. Also Koji fungi may work like P. or G. Candidum outside the cheese or Koji can be used in combination with P. or G. Candidum to create a layer.

I just don't know where to get koji fungi. Maybe a japanese restaurant around you or Hattori Hanzo  ;D can help.

Edit: more story about Koji here (http://www.tokyofoundation.org/en/topics/japanese-traditional-foods/vol.-10-koji-an-aspergillus)
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: linuxboy on July 12, 2011, 06:09:42 PM
Quote
Also Koji fungi may work like P. or G. Candidum outside the cheese or Koji can be used in combination with P. or G. Candidum to create a layer.
Aspergillus can indeed work like that. I have used it to create accelerated maturation cheese that does not proteolyse as much as p candidum, and contributes lipolytic properties, especially in breaking up TC6 and TC8 triglycerides. I used a modified rice paste. Basically, a modified form of PDA that's inoculated and painted on. Was a decent cheese, but too gimmicky for me. A better use would be to match umami with umami, and create a bean paint with aspergillus and ripen it on a higher moisture parm variant, in a smaller form factor.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: ArnaudForestier on July 12, 2011, 06:22:15 PM
Quote from: Gürkan Yeniçeri
I just don't know where to get koji fungi.

It's been a long while, but I used to buy koji for sake making, through Momokawa.  Nice people, too.  Don't know if they provide koji any longer, however.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on July 18, 2011, 02:40:44 PM
So some of the new flavors were a hit at the picnic yesterday.
Favorites of the group: garlic/dill, sundried tomato/basil, vindaloo curry.  Herbs de Province is the all around staple that everyone always loves. I also liked my new creation: szechwan peppercorn/hickory smoked sea salt. though the feedback was that it needed a bit more kick.  ;)

For the tomato/basil I took DRY sundried tomatoes (hard not marinated) and put them in the food processor with dried basil and turned them into a powder and then rolled the cheese in the dust. Let it sit for about 5 days to absorb the flavor. It was pretty intense and the flavor was solid throughout the cheese.

Thanks all for the input!
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Saltysteele on August 31, 2011, 05:55:30 PM
do you typically use dried herbs for cheeses?

i've got fresh thyme, basil and oregano (i think mint, too, but pretty sure that's gone to seed).

i hope to make chevre this weekend, and am thinking of doing a sun dried tomato and basil.  how much would you suggest using (speaking specifically of the sun dried tomato) for a pound of cheese?

how about salt and pepper? just to taste, or is there a recommendation for a starting point?  just regular black pepper (or mixed), or would white pepper also work?

did you mix your herbes de provence yourself, or is there a spice mix you can purchase for this?

thank you!  :)
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on September 08, 2011, 04:18:05 PM
Sorry for the delay Salty. I don't get on here as often as I used to.
1. I used dried although I'm sure as long as your herbs are clean you could use fresh, but fresh requires move and might add a fiber quality to the cheese where as dried can be crushed to dust.

2. Ratio is really up to you and how long you are going to let it sit before eating. I have found 2-3 days is perfect. Any sooner and the flavor is just on the outside (if coated vs. mixing). And after a week + it gets too strong and overpowering.

3. For the sun dried I used 3 or 4 small dried tomatoes for 1/4 pound and it was way more than enough. I would say a tablespoon or two for a pound. I found it was best to mix more favorable  to the basil than tomato.

4. For Salt and Pepper I was using hickory smoked sea salt for a smokey spicy twist. I just added the relative amount the base recipe called for instead of using cheese or kosher salt. I used lots of large cracked peppercorns, much like you would coat a burger. This one takes some time to soften up the peppercorns and too many was not a good thing.

5. I buy all my spices from Savory Spice Shop. They have great stuff and do their own blends and onsite grinding and mixing. They ship too. savoryspiceshop.com (http://savoryspiceshop.com)

Hope that helps!
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Myrrh on September 13, 2011, 04:27:08 PM
My two favorite flavors for fresh cheeses are Olive and Chive as well as Date and Walnut. I used pitted olives and dates so that I can use the food processor to chop them up.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: drumbeat on September 13, 2011, 11:13:11 PM
I'm not sure how this would go in a tangy goat milk cheese, but on my last cream cheese I decided to sweeten it up a little - cranberry, apricot, a little crystallised ginger and some chopped nuts - it went down a treat with everyone who tried it - they all want more.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on September 19, 2011, 01:06:10 PM
both the olive and crystalized ginger sound awesome. Never thought of anything like that.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on September 29, 2011, 11:25:23 AM
I was trying to pair a goat cheese with strawberries. I discovered that thyme and lavender make an excellent combination. Top with a fresh strawberry slice and serve with a strawberry lambic like Timmerman's!
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: iratherfly on September 30, 2011, 05:21:37 PM
Why not do some traditional flavoring?  Think back in the box?  >:D

I mean... have to tried leaf wrapping? (The leaves themselves could be flavored, soaked in brandy or something like that)
How about aging and growing a rind? (Like Crottin)
Or, how about making the cheese super drained so it is more firm than usual and then let it infuse in a jar full of olive oil with peppercorns, bay leaves and herbes de provence?

I feel that goat cheese is such a classic rustic table commodity with long European tradition... strawberries do it justice in goats cheesecake, but to do it real justice think of its origins in the Loire valley and Northern Italy... fresh bread, maybe herbs and olive oil, pickles or olives, tomato. That's it. Simple simple simple.

Here are a few of my flavors. The first one is Lemon oil and Pimenton (Spanish sweet paprika) and next to it is herbes de provrnce with olive oil.  The next photo is crottin. Two aged and rinded "as-is" and two wrapped with grape leaves which were soaked in Calvados (French Apple brandy) for a few days.  Traditionally this would be tied with raffia but I didn't have any so I used a kitchen twine.
The last one is a very traditional Provençal recipe. I aged it like crottins for about 10 days (you don't have to do this, just drain them very well so that they are firm enough not to fall apart in liquid). I then cut them to pieces and put them in olive oil with basic herbs as I suggested above.  If you are going to do this, mix about 25% canola oil otherwise it will freeze up in the refrigerator. This does not need refregiration and can easily stay in a dark cupboard for 12 months
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on October 04, 2011, 09:47:05 AM
iratherfly,

Don't get me wrong I do very traditional combinations most of the time, but after about 50 times it gets old, so I like to get out of my rut by looking for creative twists. Herbs de Provence is the one I do the most and I love doing infused olive oils. My crottins have been rocking and I do them about every other batch. I do have the grape leaves and raffia but did not think to soak the leaves themselves. I'll have to try that!

Thanks,  Chris
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: iratherfly on October 04, 2011, 05:26:14 PM
No problem. Be creative. I would focus on affinage rather than too many strong flavorants. This way you keep it focused on the milk quality and your cheesemaking skill. People can put their own spices and fruits on cheese, but they can't age them for 14 days in liquer-soaked grape leaves tied in raffia. To me, the best cheese is the one where you taste is and say "Oh, it would be a shame to add anything to it!"...

Grape leaves can be soaked in many different wines, liquors or beers to create exciting flavors and aromas. Remember that those alcoholic beverages have an array of yeasts that do interesting things to the rind.  You can soak the leaves in a good quality Balsamic or Sherry vinegar or in tea too! (Tanins on tea and vinegar will give the cheese a striking look).

You can also use high quality lose tea or chai as a coating. Also a good quality cocoa or coffee grinds can be very interesting.

More on affinage: there are some old methods of doing affinage in clay pots where the cheese is being suspended on a grille over a pool of liquor such as Apple brandy. The result is deep and fascinating flavor and aroma. It's not as overwhelming as putting strawberries on it. It's gentle and effects the cheese in a much deeper level. The cheese would open up in your mouth in stages. You first feel the cheese and then the liquor flavor and yeasts and aromas of its fruits will expose itself beautifully (Apple flavor is using Apple brandy, Anise flavor if you use Ouzo, Almond if you use Amaretto Etc.)

Two more suggestions... have you tried smoking them? And last, something I saw in France; crusting them with flambé. It gives them this toasty crusty rind. Fascinating but needs some practice to get right. The heat must be applied very high and very short time as to not boil the pâté of the cheese
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on October 05, 2011, 02:26:40 PM
I actually checked the liquor cabinet last night and realized I was out of brandy. Will need to restock. I have some great beers and rum that might work.

I like the idea of using the alcohol vapors, especially from some of my bourbon beers that I love so much. The smell is almost better than the beer.

I won a Big Green Egg for a Beer-BBQ competition. I'm assembling it now and hope to start doing some smoking again! I was thinking about smoking cheddar or mozz but didn't think about fresh goat. 

By the way the strawberry reference was for a beer pairing party. I served a strawberry lambic with a goat cheese, onion and strawberry pizza. Hence the need to find out what flavors of herbs paired with strawberries so that I could flavor the base of the pizza accordingly. It worked great. I don't normally just eat them on a cracker.  ;)
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: CheeseSnipe on December 28, 2011, 03:43:28 PM
The bourbon soaked grape leaf wrapped crottin turned out pretty awesome. Some chef friends of mine said it was the best goat cheese they've ever had. I think it still needs some work but it's a good twist on the same old cheese.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Crystal on January 04, 2012, 01:53:51 PM
Sounds like i need to make some goats cheese, you guys are having all the fun... One up side, i have PLENTY of vine leaves, theres an ornamental grape some where in my back yard. down side, i got no goats, lol. i know i can buy milk some where though...

Also, i have a friend who is starting out on cheese and goats cheese is her preference, ill send her over here for a look!
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: iratherfly on January 14, 2012, 10:14:24 PM
Crystal - done any yet? It is goat season in your neck of the woods. You should not get great goat's milk there.

CheeseSnipe - Sorry, I was away for a couple of weeks. Any photos? Sounds really great!
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: anutcanfly on January 14, 2012, 10:52:10 PM
Goat cheese makes for a great ice cream.  Tastes like cheesecake and served with strawberry freezer jam or walnut and honey on top... Soooo good!  :P
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Crystal on January 15, 2012, 02:09:39 PM
Nope Yoda, not goats milk for me. I dont have access to a goat, come to think of it, i havent seen a goat in about 5 years... Might check the fruit shop for goats milk, they carry some different milks.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Brewandwinesupply on May 18, 2012, 03:54:54 PM
Did some a while back with red pepper for a little heat, and our favorite was crushed black pepper. We also did some with Italian herebs and another one with garlic.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: anutcanfly on May 18, 2012, 04:47:14 PM
My favorite so far is to blend in a tiny amount of honey and lime juice to the Chevre and place it on a bed of toasted walnuts and dried sweetened cranberries.  Great topping for a nice crusty french or sourdough baguette.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: smilingcalico on May 19, 2012, 09:23:01 AM
Anut, that's quite creative and delicious sounding!
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Brie on May 19, 2012, 06:38:31 PM
I love chevre coated with partially pink peppercorns--it's beautiful and tasty. I also got bored so mixed some expresso coffee powder in and then topped with a drizzle of caramel sauce--outstanding reviews! For a dessert, after the chevre was drained, I formed it into balls and dipped in bittersweet chocolate--Chevre truffles!
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: StinkyCheese on July 18, 2012, 08:00:07 PM
I also got bored so mixed some expresso coffee powder in and then topped with a drizzle of caramel sauce--outstanding reviews! For a dessert, after the chevre was drained, I formed it into balls and dipped in bittersweet chocolate--Chevre truffles!

These sound fantastic for gluten-free me.  :)  I am working on finishing a batch of goat labneh that has roasted garlic & green chili powder added.  Really delicious drizzled over scrambled eggs.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: Margo McIntosh on July 19, 2012, 06:11:41 AM
I am just venturing into adding herbs to cheese and am confused by the different recommendations on the internet.  Do you boil or microwave your herbs before you use them?  I hate to do that because I'd lose so much of the health benefits of these herbs but I have read that herbs can add some nasties to cheese?  For chèvre because it's eaten so quickly that may not be an issue?  What about adding herbs to hard cheese?  Is it a different process?
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: linuxboy on July 19, 2012, 06:32:50 AM
Wash in peroxide, citric acid solution, chlorine oxide, peracetic, organic acid solution (blend of lactic, propionic, other acids per experimented data) or similar food-safe sanitizer. You may also try an inhibitor, such as sorbate.
Title: Re: Looking for new flavors
Post by: iratherfly on July 20, 2012, 04:38:05 PM
I use dry herbs. They have different health benefits (they actually have nutrients that you won't find in the fresh versions, which they obtain from sun drying, as well as stronger umami flavor). Another thing I like about them is that they don't ferment as fresh herbs may do, and you can even boil them before tossing them into the milk.
If you use strong flavored herbs (such as Herbes de Provence) I would not mix them in the cheese, but rather roll the finished cheese in them so they only coat the outside. Otherwise their flavor is far too concentrated and it will overwhelm your cheese.

If you want to use fresh herbs, another option for you would be to cut the cheese to medallions and marinate it with oil which is infused with herbs. You can also put garlic, peppercorns, etc. This will also preserve your cheese so instead of 14 days, you can keep it in oil for many months and risk no spoilage.  Grapeseed oil, (or a mix of 75% grapeseed oil + 25% extra virgin olive oil) makes best marinate in terms of flavor enhancement, fast infusion and oil viscosity. Do NOT use 100% olive oil as it will harden in the fridge.  I love making omelets on a Sunday with these marinated medallions. I use the infused oil marinate (usually has some pieces of herbs and peppercorns in it) to fry the omelet in. Yumm!