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GENERAL CHEESE MAKING BOARDS (Specific Cheese Making in Boards above) => Problems - Questions - Problems - Questions? => Topic started by: Boofer on January 27, 2013, 10:56:17 AM

Title: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on January 27, 2013, 10:56:17 AM
Not so long ago, Tiarella voiced a desire to have a forum subject or thread where pics could be gathered in one place. This probably is not what she was looking for, but I felt it might be helpful to have a Thread of Shame where dirty cheese laundry could be hung up for all to see and hopefully benefit from.

I offer these painful lessons in my cheesemaking efforts:
Yes, there are others, but they are early failures so they are granted Beginner's Lack of Luck & Experience status.

If anyone else has a need to come clean and air their errors ???, feel free to sign up here. If you do, it would be helpful to highlight appropriate pics or threads and include a brief description of what you think went wrong. ;)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: mtncheesemaker(Pam) on January 27, 2013, 05:53:16 PM
LOL! Thanks for sharing! Reminded me of my own jaded past...
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on January 28, 2013, 08:03:17 AM
Just trying to keep it interesting.... ::)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: AndreasMergner on January 28, 2013, 03:32:27 PM
Boofer, I like the idea of this thread a lot! 

I have a bunch of failures and thought it was just me.  Boofer, cheese demigod, could not possibly have made the type of mistakes I have made.  :)  Good to know we all started out somewhere.  I may post some failures once the sting has faded a bit.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on January 28, 2013, 06:44:24 PM
Good to know we all started out somewhere.
You know, if you look really closely, you can see that I'm still fumbling in the dark with some of my makes. Whoopee!

Eh, when you step up to the plate, sometimes you just foul out. :'(  But you gotta try! ;)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: AndreasMergner on January 28, 2013, 07:42:11 PM
Yes, but you are making some exceptional and very interesting cheeses.  When you are in the cheese Danger Zone there's always the risk of....danger...and bad cheese.   ;D
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Mike Richards on January 28, 2013, 08:53:23 PM
Unfortunately, some of us are sufficiently blind that even the Safe Area of cheese making is the Danger Zone.  :-[  Like the time I failed to distinguish between 1 1/2 tsp and 1 1/2 Tbsp for a 30-minute mozzarella.  It turns out 1 1/2 Tbsp of citric acid is quite a bit for 2 gallons of milk...

You also might have seen my recent cam make where I had a messy mistake:

[img width= height= alt=wet curd pile on cheese mat]http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/530762_281415091983938_1888296182_n.jpg[/img]

I just figure, if I keep making mistakes, but don't repeat them too often, sooner or later I will have made most of the mistakes out there and can get along without making them regularly.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Schnecken Slayer on January 29, 2013, 12:17:02 AM
My first attempt at Jarlsberg was obviously way too wet and, after drying the rind and waxing, it started weeping and cracked.
It still tastes alright although very crumbly - I cut it in half and let it dry out some more before vacuum sealing it.
http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,10508.0.html (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,10508.0.html)

My second attempt is only about 2/3 the height and so far is fairing well. (Although I got carried away while waxing and did it in red also. The yellow seems a bit more elastic)
http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,10842.0.html (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,10842.0.html)


Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: H-K-J on January 29, 2013, 10:24:00 AM
My first Swiss (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,9541.msg69761.html#msg69761) went totally and literally to piece's :-[
It took months of questions and a lot of help from the more knowledgeable people on the forum before I attempted it a second time (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,10338.0.html).
I am happy to report it is doing fine at 3 months of ageing ;D
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on January 29, 2013, 11:22:13 AM
I like this thread!

I have added too much rennet (because the recipe called for too much). This causes a very firm rubbery texture.

Not enough culture causes a bitter flavor. I used 1/4 tsp versus 1 tsp.

Not calibrating the PH meter before use caused me to end up with really low ph levels. Really low ph produces a hard, dry and tangy cheese.

Not soaking in the brine long enough causes a low salt level which results in bitter cheese.

Not cooling the brine before putting the cheese in it causes the cheese to absorb liquid and swell up. It was still edible.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on January 29, 2013, 11:34:32 AM
On Boofer's list I have done the 3rd one and came out with that whop-sided cheese. It was still delicious.

Also on Boofer's notes he had one where he was washing it with liqueur and I had that same problem with an Ale Washed Trappist cheese a few months ago. The outside was the same color, and it wiped off like his did. The taste was horribly bitter. I was using a recipe out of Mary Karlin's book, and I'm still not sure what happened to cause that. I was washing mine with a water, beer, salt mixture.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: BobE102330 on January 29, 2013, 12:17:02 PM
...Not cooling the brine before putting the cheese in it causes the cheese to absorb liquid and swell up. It was still edible.

That (hopefully) explains it.  My first cheese with raw milk is a Montasio that puffed up in the brine and feels a bit spongy.  Hopefully it will still be edible when it is appropriately aged.  It smells good on the outside.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: flac on January 29, 2013, 11:46:45 PM
Saving my spot for later. I will end up with some note worthy errors soon enough.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Vina on January 30, 2013, 02:04:53 AM
Boofer, I like the idea! Thanks!
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tiarella on January 30, 2013, 05:46:37 AM

I have a bunch of failures and thought it was just me.  Boofer, cheese demigod, could not possibly have made the type of mistakes I have made.  :)

"Cheese Demigod"  Yeah, that's the perfect way to describe Boofer!  :D  I like it.  I had been thinking "Cheese Ambassador" because of his unfailing graciousness and encouraging kindness but I think the demigod concept fits!!   ;D. Tha avatar he's chosen certainly fits that too! 
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on January 30, 2013, 07:27:06 AM

I have a bunch of failures and thought it was just me.  Boofer, cheese demigod, could not possibly have made the type of mistakes I have made.  :)

"Cheese Demigod"  Yeah, that's the perfect way to describe Boofer!  :D  I like it.  I had been thinking "Cheese Ambassador" because of his unfailing graciousness and encouraging kindness but I think the demigod concept fits!!   ;D. Tha avatar he's chosen certainly fits that too!
:-[ ::) :-[

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: mgasparotto on January 30, 2013, 07:38:09 AM
Thanks, Boofer, this is a great idea for a thread.

My epic fail contribution is a gouda that stuck to the cheesecloth:

Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Milk Maid on January 30, 2013, 10:51:09 AM
This is a great thread. How about this weirdness; I mixed curds from two different pots of cheese (normally I don't use two different pots at once but strange things happen). A month later, I decided to check on the inside of the wheel. Cut it open and found there were translucent chunks scattered throughout. I asked someone at Dairy Connection and she said it was because each of the pots of curds had different pHs. There was a leaching effect when the two were mixed. Lesson: don't use two pots.

I still don't know why that makes the cheese translucent.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on January 30, 2013, 11:10:55 AM
I asked someone at Dairy Connection and she said it was because each of the pots of curds had different pHs. There was a leaching effect when the two were mixed. Lesson: don't use two pots.

I still don't know why that makes the cheese translucent.

I was thinking about trying the two pot method for a swiss cheese so that I could make an 8 gallon one. Now I am worried about that.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: hoeklijn on January 30, 2013, 12:35:30 PM
Well, this is certainly a thread  I can contribute to, not with pictures and most of it is already posted somewhere...
First of all, when you're pre-draining curds for e.g. Valencay and trying to make a knot in the cheesecloth, don't let part of the cloth slip. No, I didn't make pictures of a bathroom floor covered with curd...
An other failure was this batch of Brie: http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,9636.msg70345.html#msg70345 (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,9636.msg70345.html#msg70345). Had to throw it away because of the smell....
Again thinking about the subject, I realize I had more mistakes than real failures.
I made a Reblonbert because I used too much PC Neige and the BL didn't do it's job, but it turned into a nice cheese http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,9671.msg70759.html#msg70759 (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,9671.msg70759.html#msg70759).
When I tried Fourme d'Ambert, it was all but a FdA, but it was an appreciated blue...http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,9539.msg69222.html#msg69222 (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,9539.msg69222.html#msg69222)
And remember to check notes on previous batches, I once had to cut the Reblochons I made horizontally in two, because I used the same moulds as the batch before, but with twice as much milk. But again good tasting cheese...
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Alpkäserei on January 30, 2013, 02:51:32 PM
No pictures to post, but we all make mistakes.

Elsewhere, there's a thread of two of my failures. Cheeses that contain flaws making them unsuitable for commercial sale. Also somewhere deep down in the caves, there are a couple of wheels with considerably large surface flaws due to a lag before I got them pressed (oops!)

Once I took too long to get the cheese up to temperature, that's not good.
One time I had one of my forms break (these are adjustable forms with wooden blocks holding a string for adjustment. The block broke off while I was adjusting the form size)

I guess failure in this instance depends on your goals. If my goal is to make cheese that tastes good for personal use, then I guess I've got a perfect record (I have never thrown out a cheese). If your goal is to produce cheeses that meet a high standard for commercial sale, then I have plenty of failures and will continue to have failures.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: AndreasMergner on January 30, 2013, 08:31:14 PM
How about letting a rind get out of hand because you don't know what you are doing with a washed rind?

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/15101_4346770460193_1596363748_n.jpg)

I had something growing under the rind and making a blister (also smelled meaty), so turned it into this after I washed the rind under the tap.  Now it needs to be vac bagged because of the rind being compromised.

(http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/28017_4367719863915_283389678_n.jpg)

How about putting a cheese in the oven to keep it warmer than your cold house...and forgetting the oven light is on...and the temp can go above 90 degrees with just the light as a heat source?

(http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/602843_4596679227756_595188296_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Al Lewis on January 30, 2013, 08:40:32 PM
Well neither of my Colbys came out well.  Pretty sure I waxed the regular too soon and the Merlot wine seemed to dry out the other.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Al Lewis on January 30, 2013, 08:43:26 PM
Then there was the Camembert that never got soft.  Not positive but I think the extra ultra pasteurized cream I added may have dealt a hand in this.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Al Lewis on January 30, 2013, 08:52:21 PM
Finally, there was the great Cambozola debacle of 2012.  This will go down in the annals of cheese making as both the greatest, and the dumbest idea in history.  Seems that a single piece of curd 8" in diameter and 7.5" high does NOT have the structural integrity to support itself, even in a mold.  LOL ???  WHATEVER you do NEVER stick the mold in the pot of curd and try to turn it out over the sink in one piece.  It doesn't work!!!  LOL  Sorry but we didn't get any shots of the two gallons of curd on the floor and sink.  LOL
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tom Turophile / CheeseStud on January 31, 2013, 09:40:26 AM
LOL!  Thank God you were smart enough to do that in the pot...

Andreas, I had no idea, but it sounds like an Easy-Bake oven.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: AndreasMergner on January 31, 2013, 03:05:09 PM
That was a funny one, Al.  I'm sure it wasn't at the time!  :D
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on January 31, 2013, 03:19:08 PM

How about putting a cheese in the oven to keep it warmer than your cold house...and forgetting the oven light is on...and the temp can go above 90 degrees with just the light as a heat source?

([url]http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/602843_4596679227756_595188296_n.jpg[/url])


I like this one, it sounds like something I would do
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: margaretsmall on February 03, 2013, 04:00:33 AM
My worst so far has just happened. Spent the afternoon making a blue, the sort where you drain the curd for a while, then tie it in a bundle and press it overnight. I decided to use two 2l milk containers (now filled with whey) as my weights. Didn't want the lot to come tumbling down so for safety's sake (ha!) put in one side of our double kitchen sink - a baking dish/the cheese bundle/a cutting board/ two milk containers balanced delicately on top. Didn't think I needed to explain all of this to my husband. Who took the dirty dishes to the kitchen, took the milk containers and the board off (I wonder what he thought the bundle was? I wonder why he thought I'd put two full milk containers on top of this arrangement?) and proceeded to rinse the dishes onto the bundle. Yes folks, I've never before had to ditch a cheese at such an early stage. Maybe by tomorrow I will manage to be civil again.  It was raw goat milk too, which I'd driven a round trip of 50km to get.  I read once that gardening taught you acceptance of whatever nature throws at you; I think cheesemaking is in the same league.
 Margaret
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tiarella on February 03, 2013, 07:02:12 AM
Oh, Margaret!  That is SO awful!!   :-X.  :-\.  :o.  >:(. I am VERY sorry to hear of your loss.  And to have driven so far to get the milk and everything.  Waaaah!  If you've been uncivil enough perhaps he'll ask you the next time there's something strange in the sink.  I put "do not touch" signs on things sometimes but not always and have had some oops moments but never something as painful as yours.  My condolences.   :)
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on February 03, 2013, 08:23:25 AM
I don't know what I would have said at the exact moment when I discovered that, but I'm sure that I would have regretted it when I cooled off. All you can do is try again and tell your husband to stay away from the sink.
I also think that cheese making teaches us patience and I know that I could not have done it when I was younger. I would have been frustrated with the waiting. I was doing more instant gratification hobbies back then.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on February 03, 2013, 09:14:36 AM
Maybe by tomorrow I will manage to be civil again.
Wow. I'm speechless.... ???  Well, sort of. ;)

Chin up, Margaret. The next cheese you make will eclipse what this lost cheese would have been.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Al Lewis on February 03, 2013, 10:33:06 AM
My worst so far has just happened. Spent the afternoon making a blue, the sort where you drain the curd for a while, then tie it in a bundle and press it overnight. I decided to use two 2l milk containers (now filled with whey) as my weights. Didn't want the lot to come tumbling down so for safety's sake (ha!) put in one side of our double kitchen sink - a baking dish/the cheese bundle/a cutting board/ two milk containers balanced delicately on top. Didn't think I needed to explain all of this to my husband. Who took the dirty dishes to the kitchen, took the milk containers and the board off (I wonder what he thought the bundle was? I wonder why he thought I'd put two full milk containers on top of this arrangement?) and proceeded to rinse the dishes onto the bundle. Yes folks, I've never before had to ditch a cheese at such an early stage. Maybe by tomorrow I will manage to be civil again.  It was raw goat milk too, which I'd driven a round trip of 50km to get.  I read once that gardening taught you acceptance of whatever nature throws at you; I think cheesemaking is in the same league.
 Margaret

So when's the funeral? LOL
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: margaretsmall on February 03, 2013, 04:17:11 PM
The internment (of the cheese that is) was immediate. My husband is forgiven and I've been reminded that things that are blindingly obvious to me are simply invisible to others. It was only some milk, I keep telling myself.  Thank you for your sympathy! But it will be a little while before I make any more.
Margaret
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Mike Richards on February 03, 2013, 07:33:21 PM
Being that husband--the one who's oblivious to things--i just want to point out--he was rinsing off the dishes!  That's pretty good for some husbands...  It seems I mess stuff up most when I'm trying to be helpful--wash and dry the clothes without spraying the stains, wash (and dry) a new dark colored towel with some light colored things with warm water, put the baby in pajamas that are too big or too small ("but they say 0-3 months, how can they be too big?"), etc.

I feel really bad for you and the cheese.  I can understand your husband, too.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Vina on February 06, 2013, 04:05:37 AM
My worst so far has just happened. Spent the afternoon making a blue, the sort where you drain the curd for a while, then tie it in a bundle and press it overnight. I decided to use two 2l milk containers (now filled with whey) as my weights. Didn't want the lot to come tumbling down so for safety's sake (ha!) put in one side of our double kitchen sink - a baking dish/the cheese bundle/a cutting board/ two milk containers balanced delicately on top. Didn't think I needed to explain all of this to my husband. Who took the dirty dishes to the kitchen, took the milk containers and the board off (I wonder what he thought the bundle was? I wonder why he thought I'd put two full milk containers on top of this arrangement?) and proceeded to rinse the dishes onto the bundle. Yes folks, I've never before had to ditch a cheese at such an early stage. Maybe by tomorrow I will manage to be civil again.  It was raw goat milk too, which I'd driven a round trip of 50km to get.  I read once that gardening taught you acceptance of whatever nature throws at you; I think cheesemaking is in the same league.
 Margaret

auch!! I'm very sorry to hear that! Yes, and I can understand you becoming wild for a while.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: rosawoodsii on February 06, 2013, 05:00:32 PM
I've definitely had my share of failures, but I'm so good at hiding the results that I don't have any photos.  ;D  Mozzarella continues to escape me.  For every time I've made it well, I've failed 2-3 times.  I don't make it anymore. It doesn't stretch, it's hard as a rock, and my hands protest putting them into hot water.

My Jarlsburg (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,10328.msg82077.html#msg82077) may or may not be a success; I'll know at the end of this month.  It swelled hugely before it was supposed to--and didn't swell at all when it was supposed to. 

My most spectacular failures, though, were from storing the cheeses in my farmhouse basement and forgetting about them.  Talk about gross!  The brown mold ate through the thick layer of was on 5 cheeses and destroyed them.  I even threw the photos out, because it was hard to tell what they were.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: chefrjmarvin on February 20, 2013, 04:28:06 PM
thanks for this post.  its reassuring to remind myself over and over that this is new and there WILL be mistakes.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on March 19, 2013, 07:50:10 PM
Brew Curd Cheddar\ from Mary Karlin's book. The recipe said to cook the cheddar for 30 minutes without stirring, so I did. My regular cheddar recipe cooks it for 30 minutes stirring, and let rest for 20 minutes. I know that a cheddar should be cooked longer than that but I thought that I would follow the recipe. The ph level at draining was 6.6, way too high. The curd was very soft at the end of the cheddaring. Next time, I will use the cheddar recipe that I know works, and add the beer to it.

After the cheese sat out on the counter for 4 hours, it sank down, like a bell. It got fat at the bottom and the outside busted. I did not take it's picture, so I can't post that. Next time I will think of that.

This is a picture before it sank. It looked good then
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on March 19, 2013, 10:02:11 PM
Felicitations, Tammy. :'(

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: BobE102330 on March 28, 2013, 11:30:00 AM
An attempt at Muschli that I didn't knead enough so it retained far too much whey. As seems to be my usual failure mode lately, it wouldn't be a failure if I was trying to make Muenster.  Somewhat firm with a mild linens bite.

(http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=10963.0;attach=24989;image)
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on March 29, 2013, 07:29:24 AM
That looks pretty good, Bob. Failure?

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tiarella on March 29, 2013, 10:49:32 AM
An attempt at Muschli that I didn't knead enough so it retained far too much whey. As seems to be my usual failure mode lately, it wouldn't be a failure if I was trying to make Muenster.  Somewhat firm with a mild linens bite.

([url]http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=10963.0;attach=24989;image[/url])


Bob, I think this is more about needing to change what you do to address the changing qualities of milk at this time of year than something you did wrong.  I think your make behaviors would have made just what you wanted with different seasonal milk.  I'm having this problem too and some good experts weighed in and confused  me offered suggestions.  I can't remember the name of the thread but it was something in the Problems/questions board, maybe the title starts with "Help!"  Can't remember and don't want to look for it right now.  But check it out......I think it's the milk and there are some suggestions on how to adapt what you do to address this.   :D
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: rosawoodsii on March 29, 2013, 01:19:36 PM
Yup, I have two doe goats newly fresh, and the milk at this stage is sooo much different than mid or late lactation.  It's almost like learning all over again.  This year I promised myself I'd make note of the lactation point (not something that most people can do because they're not doing the milking themselves).
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: BobE102330 on March 29, 2013, 01:53:24 PM
Thanks Tiarella, I'll take a look.

Boofer, not a total failure, but this was supposed to be a fairly hard alpine style cheese and it's rather springy and softish, almost spreadable.   I tried to make manchego, it turned out a lot like this, too. 
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: rosawoodsii on March 29, 2013, 04:41:19 PM
That's when you name it by a brand new name, tell everyone it's a cheese you developed on your own, and hope you can duplicate it. ;D
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on March 30, 2013, 08:20:44 PM
That's when you name it by a brand new name, tell everyone it's a cheese you developed on your own, and hope you can duplicate it. ;D
Hey, Bob...what she said.... ;)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: kdttocs on April 04, 2013, 10:27:53 AM
Love this thread.

Here are a couple from my first Camembert make. Fortunately I improved my process on both fronts over the next few batches and the latest Cam turned out great!
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Dibbs on April 04, 2013, 11:28:07 AM
That's not a failure.  It's like Torta Cañarejal but not quite the right shape.  Just make it a bit taller and narrower then slice the top off and use it as a dip.  I'd imagined it would be difficult to get it runny inside but with the rind holding up like that.  Lovely stuff.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Dibbs on April 04, 2013, 11:29:45 AM
here's one

http://aforkfulofspaghetti.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/ewe-must-try-this-runny-cheese-fun-with.html (http://aforkfulofspaghetti.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/ewe-must-try-this-runny-cheese-fun-with.html)

Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: kdttocs on April 04, 2013, 11:37:29 AM
here's one

[url]http://aforkfulofspaghetti.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/ewe-must-try-this-runny-cheese-fun-with.html[/url] ([url]http://aforkfulofspaghetti.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/ewe-must-try-this-runny-cheese-fun-with.html[/url])

WoW! That's a great idea for my next p/c *fail*. As Cams usually come in pairs the 2nd can be eaten this way after seeing what happens to the first.

My only thing is the liquid at cool/room temp was a little off putting. Maybe if I warmed it up a bit first. Thanks!


Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: akhoneybee on April 04, 2013, 12:53:37 PM
I reproduce the camembert exactly like ktddocs, it's like we were side by side!!  Hah, look at my crottin ladies post.  I guess I should go back to the cam's and master those first!
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Marta on April 04, 2013, 02:48:06 PM
Oh, too bad I don't have pictures of my Fontina with the multi colored mold.  Or how about the cheddar where I used too little salt and had to get up at midnight to break the block apart and resalt ... the resulting rind looked like a Mayan ruin (but the cheese good).  Then there is the storied day my housemate decided to make tea ... on the stove ... where my cheddar vat was floccing.  What happens next...? Why isn't the kettle whistling?  I hear a piteous cry from the kitchen when she realized she had turned on the wrong burner.  By the time I got there the vat was actually steaming.  So I put it the curds in the press right then, and we enjoyed really good paneer for ... days ...

Ah.  Confession.  Good for the soul.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on April 04, 2013, 03:22:00 PM
Why isn't the kettle whistling?
Or the kettle's spout whistle was not engaged and my poor wife adhered another kettle to the electric burner element while she was distracted elsewhere.... :o ::)

Marta, would you please add your location to your profile? Thanks, ever so.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Marta on April 05, 2013, 06:46:36 AM
Sorry, friends.  Michigan, USA: land of milk and more milk, where you can sometimes get contraband raw milk!
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on April 07, 2013, 08:33:47 AM
Morning! Fresh out of the press. My latest Brew Curd Cheese. I pressed it naked, that's why the little nubs. Obviously the arm on the press did something after I walked away from it. I will cut it up before I serve it, it will still be good.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on April 07, 2013, 08:49:05 AM
Ah, Tammy, a true artisan beauty! :D

Thanks for sharing. We commiserate with you. :(

It will most likely taste marvelous.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tiarella on April 07, 2013, 10:05:08 AM
Morning! Fresh out of the press. My latest Brew Curd Cheese. I pressed it naked, that's why the little nubs. Obviously the arm on the press did something after I walked away from it. I will cut it up before I serve it, it will still be good.

That is incredibly sculptural!  Kind of surreal.  it would make a great centerpiece with some action figures on it!!   ;D
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: leboy001 on April 09, 2013, 09:31:01 PM
I made a cheese (think a Maasdam) a while back. It was a large cheese i think using about 20l (over 5 gal). I went to bed with it in the press overnight. The next day i woke up very very sick so decided to err on the side of caution and assume that i had in fact made a cheese shaped germ colony.

It was a tough decision to throw it away :'(
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on April 10, 2013, 08:43:14 AM
At varying times I may have a head cold or something similar that I don't want to share with my cheeses. At those times, I will wear a throwaway surgical mask to limit my exposure to a cheese I may be turning, washing, rubbing, brushing, etc. I also typically wear blue nitrile gloves when dealing with my cheeses, regardless whether I'm sick. So far it has been a good policy, but then I wasn't deathly ill either.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on July 04, 2013, 12:01:53 PM
Well, I didn't have a lot of confidence in this little sideshow from the beginning (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php?action=post;topic=11475.0;last_msg=89575) given my past history. This cheese effort was too salty. The blueberries didn't dry out the paste so much, but they didn't contribute any fruit flavor either.

I think I'll hang up my fruit-in-the-cheese ideas and do something anything else. :o

This mess was deposited in the compost pile. :(

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Al Lewis on July 04, 2013, 01:39:26 PM
Looks a bit like the wine washed colby I attempted.  Not a great idea either.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: JeffHamm on July 04, 2013, 02:05:57 PM
A shame Boofer.  It looks like it should have been good, but as we know, there are cheeses that look like they should be incinerated and biosecurity called in except they taste to devine!  Others, look fine but taste of brimstone. 

- Jeff
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on July 23, 2013, 07:16:35 PM
My turn to add to the family album. I wanted to make a cheddar with cranberries. I didn't boil the cranberries, and I used way too many of them. Now the vacuum seal bag continues to swell up and I keep having to let the air out. Sailor says that it may be Clostridium which is not a good thing. I suspected it had gone south when it continue to poof out the bag.

I will try again, with about 1/4 of the cranberries, and I will chop them and boil them next time.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on July 24, 2013, 07:42:16 AM
Thanks for having the courage to post this, Tammy. It can be demoralizing to have one of these episodes but your sharing may help prevent someone else's misstep or failure.

Eh, now buck up and make another cheese! ;)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: jwalker on July 24, 2013, 07:44:50 AM
I was thinking of doing a Stilton with Fruit Cocktail , but after seeing these , I think I'll pass on the fruit cheeses. ;D

Just kidding  ;D  I've never really gotten the fruit with cheese thing.

My mother loves to eat aged Cheddar with slices of apple , perhaps that's the way it should be done , with the fruit on the side.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on July 24, 2013, 04:00:00 PM
I had a  cheddar with cranberries that was excellent, it came from Wisconsin of course. I tried to buy one here at the store, but it was not real cheese, it was that mushy processed cheese food stuff. Either I'll figure it out one day, or I'll find a place to buy it.

As long as the ratio of good cheese is higher than that of cheese in the trash, I'll keep trying.

Now I have 8 gallons of milk coming on Friday, what to make?
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: JeffHamm on August 23, 2013, 09:40:48 PM
Well, if this was a Swiss I would probably be fairly happy.  However, this is supposed to be a Gouda?  After aging it out 25 weeks, and watching it blow up like a football, I finally cut it open.  It heaved a sigh of relief at the release of pressure.  It's edible, but not a great cheese.  Sometimes you hope that your mistakes will turn out to be a chance encounter with fate and a wonderful new best cheese ever will be the result.  But alas, hope is the thing with feathers, and our dreams fly off a the crack of dawn when we finally have a taste and find it to be, oddly swiss like, but a tinge of bitterness.  There was a sizable wild blue mould colony under the rind in the middle of the face opposite the large blow out cavity.  I've cut it out in this photo, and you can see where it was at the top of the cheese. 

P.S.

Tasted a few more nibbles, and the bitterness was just unpleasant.  It also had a strange flavour, like eating uncooked pasta (bought, not homemade).  So, the final call was to just bin it.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on August 24, 2013, 09:58:56 AM
I did have a Swiss that looked like that once, it swelled up and I didn't put it back in the cave, I just let it sit out until it blew itself apart on the inside. It was delicious.

I'm sorry for the loss of your cheese, we know you worked hard at making it and were looking forward to eating it.

Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: chewie on August 24, 2013, 03:57:25 PM
I was coming here today to add a confession of sorts.   all this time I thought I'd had sanitation down well enough.    major NOPE.   I thought I'd try steaming all my things in the large pot.   set it out to cool on a bleached large pan.   with tongs.   and guess what?  my goudas now don't have ANY mold on them.    :-[   I am so embarassed.   one of the reasons I post this is for any other newbies who think their normal dishwasher/handwashing routine is good enough for cheese making .  ITS NOT.   at all.   these 2 wheels are developing so very nice, not a spot on either, not a single speck!!!   

I am using the book http://www.amazon.com/Artisan-Cheese-Making-Home-World-Class/dp/1607740087/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377377734&sr=1-1&keywords=artisan+cheese+making (http://www.amazon.com/Artisan-Cheese-Making-Home-World-Class/dp/1607740087/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377377734&sr=1-1&keywords=artisan+cheese+making)   because it has recipes that are mostly 2 gallons, which is an easier amt for me to work with.   I sold a few goats and they are slowing production at this time of year, so this way I am using milk that is very fresh.   

I feel so stupid.   all this time, I just assumed.   amazing thing, sanitation.    ::)
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on August 24, 2013, 05:02:53 PM
I feel so stupid.
And with this post, you've eliminated that stigma...sharing insight with others here. ;)

A cheese to you for giving an enhanced perspective. Thanks, chewie.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: jwalker on August 25, 2013, 08:31:36 AM
I'm sorry for the loss of your cheese.

An autopsy is scheduled for later this week.
Services will be held next Sunday at 11:00am.
Food and refreshments after interment.

We take our cheese seriously here. ;D

My condolences as well Jeff. :'(

Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tiarella on August 25, 2013, 10:08:55 AM
I feel so stupid.
And with this post, you've eliminated that stigma...sharing insight with others here. ;)

A cheese to you for giving an enhanced perspective. Thanks, chewie.

-Boofer-

For another thought on sanitization......there's me.  I know enough about how stuff travels through the air, lands everywhere, etc to think that it's likely a losing battle for me to try to sterilize stuff completely.  maybe if I lived in a high rise apartment with elevator providing a little distance from dirt, pollen (okay, presume air circulation system with filter too), etc.   But I live surrounded by gardens, pollen and yeasts blowing everywhere, have cats (who stay off counters thankfully) etc.  AND.....around the world cheeses are routinely aged in natural caves (yes, it's true that there are complex constructed cave systems also) full of molds, yeasts, etc and we actually add them to cheese....and PAY for them too!  And, my brain muses on how cheese has been made for hundreds of years, even before sanitation was a concept.  (except perhaps for the Swiss according to forum member Alps). I believe that cheese was made in households with livestock IN the house, flies everywhere, etc.   

Now, I'm not a slob, I do like my kitchen to be clean and have even been known to use a sanitizing spray with thyme oil as the active ingredient.  (I don't want to put bleach into the environment so I don't use it)  But I'm not pretending I'm sanitizing everything and I'm believing that all cheese-eating ethnicities would be extinct if it was up to sanitization to make cheese making safe.  And yes, I DO know that people do sometimes die from contaminated cheese and that's a shame.  I wonder sometimes at the proportion of raw milk to pasteurized milk related problems.

I bet people who know a whole lot more than I have some differing viewpoints that are valid and might identify some delusions in my thinking and I welcome that.  I like to learn and I don't mind being wrong.  In the meantime I'm learning what to watch out for....... :o
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: chewie on August 25, 2013, 02:00:36 PM
that's what I thought too--good grief, cheese has been around forever, and there was a time that doc's didn't even wash between patients!   but, when I made 4 cheeses that have turned to slimey black and orange things smelling of ripe baby diapers, and then, using the same milk, kitchen and tools, and recipes and make 4 rounds of very pretty cheeses, i'm sold on sanitation!~

and I admit to being in love with bleach, but as to not interfer with my cheese making, I put all my stuff into my mega big pot and steamed it good and long and hot.   used tongs to remove the items, dumped the water into the sink (to use later in water bath, washing, etc.) and proceeded.   took veyr little time, and i figure that extra time has now paid off very well--i will probably be able to eat this cheese, even in front of ppl!   

I am keeping those funky wheels to see what happens to them btw.  and, I bleached the dickens outta my dorm 'cave' too.   
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on August 26, 2013, 08:51:42 AM
I was looking back a bit and discovered this forgotten make (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,2322.msg27742.html#msg27742). It seemed like it belonged in the Family Album.

Fortunately, more recent Gouda makes (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,11528.0.html) have been a little more encouraging. ;)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: cowboycheese on December 25, 2013, 03:31:23 PM
Camempatty or Hamembertger? You be the judge.

My second try of Yoav's 10 step Camembert was going good until I chose not to do one of the 10 steps - namely stir the curd after cutting. I thought, very incorrectly, that it would be nice to try scooping curd like they do it in France - without stirring. I ended up with very weak curd development in the hoops. Even after 24+ hours they just collapsed like a failed cake. Never got stiff enough to stand on their own. The Geo and PC developed nicely and they ripened so fast that they became little ammonia patties before I could sample them. They felt like flat balloons with pancake batter in them.

FWIW - I turned around a few days later and made another batch and did what I was told for all 10 steps and poof - it worked. Doh!
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tiarella on December 26, 2013, 06:57:46 AM
Was it raw milk?  I've done it without stirring the curd without any problem.  I do want to say that I like your patties and the thought of them on a hamburger, layered with red onion, lettuce, arugula, mayo, relish, ketchup......Yummmmmmmmm!!!  In a bun of course....
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Mike Richards on January 04, 2014, 10:16:34 PM
While I've seen lots of cracks in cheeses while drying, and some very small cracks right out of the brine, this was a first for me.  After the cheese had been in the brine for a few hours, I noticed small cracks.  When I finally pulled it out this evening, this is what greeted me.

This first one looks like a mouth...I should have drawn eyes and a nose.
[img width= height= alt=big crack in cheese]https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/1540298_451961031596009_1066994035_o.jpg[/img]

[img width= height= alt=another big crack]https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn2/966485_451961024929343_1684932586_o.jpg[/img]

I think I have a good idea of the series of errors that led to this consequence.  First, I reverted to cheap milk (once I started stirring, the curd turned to mush).  Then, I pressed the cheese under the whey into a loaf shape (because the vat is square shaped, and I had strained it all against one side), but my mold is round, so I sliced it up to get it in the mold.  I've done this before, however, previously, after piling the slices into the mold, I continued to press it under the whey for a while.  This time, I just put it right into the press, and didn't leave it there for very long...not sure what I was thinking.  Now to decide what to do with this...
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Pete S on January 05, 2014, 04:59:44 AM
  I would smooth them over like I do with Stilton. when I have this problem (several times with late season milk) I broke the mass into irregular chunks to put it in the mold. I get a better knit that way then with the smooth surface of a slice. they always turned out fine.   Pete
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on January 05, 2014, 09:28:41 AM
By your command.... ::)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Spoons on January 05, 2014, 11:48:32 AM
LMAO!!!
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Mike Richards on January 05, 2014, 12:48:20 PM
Boofer: That's great--much better face than I would have drawn.

Pete: Are you saying you take the cheese out of the brine, with cracks in it, and then break it up into irregular pieces and put it back in the mold?   Or are you just talking about when it comes out of the vat in a loaf you break it into irregular pieces?  I didn't think I could take this as it is, break it up, and press it again into a shape I wanted.  I suppose people do that with cheddar, but that's after it's aged for a bit....  I might have to try that, just to see what happens, though I might give it a few days for the salt to diffuse throughout the cheese before breaking it up.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Pete S on January 05, 2014, 02:43:35 PM
 I  do it when it comes out of the vat ( instead of slicing it as you did) If you did it now I don't think it would knit.
What was your intentions for this cheese--- natural rind,  waxed, cream coat.
 I wax most of mine because that gives me the texture I prefer.  Pete
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Mike Richards on January 05, 2014, 05:28:46 PM
I hadn't decided yet.  I just got a cake caddy to use as a micro-cave, so I was considering doing a natural rind.  With these cracks, though, I don't think it would be such a good idea.  I'm not exactly sure what I'll do now.

[img width= height= alt=cheese in cake caddy]https://fbcdn-sphotos-f-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/1492500_451961038262675_2045032994_o.jpg[/img]
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Spoons on January 05, 2014, 06:56:31 PM
Maybe cream wax it? Cream wax has mould inhibitor and still lets your cheese develop a rind. As long as your smiley crack's been well covered with cream wax, it should all be good.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Mike Richards on January 05, 2014, 07:09:48 PM
That's probably what I'll end up doing (you can see the stack of cream waxed cheeses in the corner there).  I'm not sure if it is what Pete was suggesting, but I might get a knife hot and see what happens when I try to "smooth it over".  If I'm not able to make myself feel comfortable about doing a natural rind, I'll do the cream wax.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: jwalker on January 06, 2014, 08:29:17 AM
Mike , do you have access to a vaccuum bagger?

I had two cheeses dry out on the outside and they had cracks way worse than yours , I sprayed it with some brine and vacuum packed them , the action of the vacuum seemed seemed to suck the cracked rind back into shape , a week later I took them out of the bags and the cracks were gone , the cheese had fused back together , they were fine after that.

Cheese welding 101. ;D
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Mike Richards on January 06, 2014, 08:53:21 AM
I do have a vacuum bagger.  Unfortunately, I don't have bags that will accommodate a 10 inch cheese.  I've read about people making bigger bags from smaller bags, but haven't ever tried it myself.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Pete S on January 06, 2014, 04:35:23 PM
 
Quote
[quote author  I'm not sure if it is what Pete was suggesting, but I might get a knife hot and see what happens when I try to "smooth it over".  If I'm not able to make myself feel comfortable about doing a natural rind, I'll do the cream wax.
[/quote]
  That is what I had in mind.
Quote
I do have a vacuum bagger.  Unfortunately, I don't have bags that will accommodate a 10 inch cheese.  I've read about people making bigger bags from smaller bags, but haven't ever tried it myself.
  You could cut it in wedges that would fit in your bags.   Pete
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tnbquilt on February 05, 2014, 05:41:57 PM
FWIW - I turned around a few days later and made another batch and did what I was told for all 10 steps and poof - it worked. Doh!
[/quote]

I have done that, and will probably do it again...
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on February 06, 2014, 01:56:58 PM
FWIW - I turned around a few days later and made another batch and did what I was told for all 10 steps and poof - it worked. Doh!

I have done that, and will probably do it again...
??? What? ???

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: JeffHamm on May 07, 2014, 01:37:15 AM
I adapted a Meunster protocol to make a brie by omitting the b.linens and adding some mould from a store bought Cam.  This has worked well in the past.  However, this time some wild blue contaminated the cheese and it seems to have taken over.  In part this was because just as the mould sort of covered the cheese, but had contamination, I had to wrap it and leave it to its own devices as we were going on a holiday.  I decided to check on it, and it's, well, more of a blue brie than anything else.  The wild blue won't be tasty, so the rind is gone, but hopefully the paste will be fine.

Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on May 07, 2014, 08:25:47 AM
Oooh, sorry Jeff.  :(

It looks...lovely. ::)  That's the trouble with leaving these little buggers to their own devices. They can't handle being on their own.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: JeffHamm on May 07, 2014, 03:40:06 PM
The kids these days!  Just no sense of responsibility.  In my day ... hmmm ... wait ... I'm pretty sure lying is wrong so I better stop now.  :)

- Jeff
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Spoons on June 29, 2014, 01:38:12 PM
I think I made a dud cheese yesterday. The poor cheese even got the nickname "Dudley". So why is Dudley such a dud cheese?

As some of you may know, I'm trying to replicate a cheese that tastes like parm (sharp but without an asiago-esk tartness), has the body of a cheddar and has some very sweet notes. A "Sweet Italian Cheddar" if you will. I had the splendud splendid idea of making a typical parm recipe but with a few adjustments:

Use full fat milk
Use a thermo cocktail that promotes sweetness (Thermo C + Flav 54)
Salt the curds without milling (saw this on an instructional video provided by Sartori cheese when making Bellavitano)

I knew that salting curds slows down acidification, but I've made enough Jack cheese to know that a cheese can go from 6.10 to 5.40 during pressing when the curd is salted... well, that was until Dudley.

Dudley is a beautiful 1049g  cheese with a PH of 6.20 after 16 hours of pressing. Yes... you read it right... 6.20! This will probably turn out as an "Italian Haloomi".

Sigh... I think I killed this cheese. lol

Question though: Do high PH cheeses age well?
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: jwalker on June 29, 2014, 06:27:19 PM


Low acid cheeses (high pH) such as Swiss have a high mineral content and have protein aggregates largely composed of intact casein micelles. Electron microscopy reveals an extensive protein matrix composed of strings of protein aggregates. Such cheeses have relatively elastic properties.


Most cheese including Cheddar should reach a minimum pH of 5.0 to 5.1 during the first week after manufacture; obtaining a final pH in this range is greatly helped by increased buffer capacity of milk proteins in the pH range 5.4 - 4.8.
Factors determining the pH at one day are amount of culture, draining pH, washing, curd treatment such as cheddaring and salting.
Draining pH is most important to cheese texture and also determines residual amounts of chymosin and plasmin in the cheese.
pH increases with age due to release of alkaline protein fragments. This is especially true of mould ripened cheeses. Camembert pH increases from 4.6 to 7.0, especially on the surface.
Increasing pH during curing encourages activity of both proteases and lipases.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Spoons on October 18, 2014, 11:03:34 AM
Here's a new one: Vat failure.

I pride myself with the vat I came up with. It's perfect! Temps controls are absolutely precise. I sometimes even make cheese without even putting a thermometer in the milk/whey (but I decided it wasn't good practice, never failed me though). Yes, it's perfect! I love it!... until today... When I saw this mess I stared at it, motionless for like 5 minutes. I'm laughing about it now though. I'll need to come up with a tweak to secure the pan to the water bath. Back to the drawing board...
 
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: pastpawn on October 18, 2014, 06:07:17 PM
Great thread.  I'm too newb to have anything to contribute, but my time is coming.  Anyway, I have learned a lot.  Thanks everyone for posting your "dirty laundry". 
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: awakephd on October 19, 2014, 11:13:06 AM
Eric, I had that experience with my first effort to move from a 1-gallon make to a 2-gallon make. When I switched to larger pots to accommodate the larger quantities, I found out the hard way that even though the handles of the inner pot rested on the rim of the outer pot, there was enough room for everything to shift over and -- disaster! Quite a sick feeling, pouring out the milk and starting over. After that I used a couple of spoons through the handles of the inner pot to keep it from being able to shift. Worked well ... but then I moved up to a 3-gallon make, and the pot for that doesn't have the same problem.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Penny C. Liam on June 19, 2015, 07:32:09 AM
I have the (dubious) honor of adding to this thread.  This Farmhouse cheddar seems to have an identity crisis.  It did not mesh and remains crumbly.  The wax coating cracked and some blue mold sneaked in and found a hospitable home.  Not a bad tasting cheese, just another "cheese surprise" like Forest Gump's box of chocolate.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Redutsa on July 30, 2015, 10:39:46 AM
I'm a newbie. With that disclaimer, I believe I've invented a new type of powdered goat cheese. Doesn't melt, doesn't taste good, but ,ought be a good packaging material.  Photos to follow...
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Spoons on June 12, 2016, 07:27:28 PM
A new addition to the failures I have known:

Goat milk Double Gloucester!

Sounds like a great idea, but the whey retention is just ridiculous! It constantly leaked for 8 months after sealing it. Every time I would unseal and dry it, it would start leaking within a week. The final result after 8 months was a bitter tasting, crumbly hard cheese.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on June 13, 2016, 10:24:10 PM
Thanks for the contribution. Always welcome. ;)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tiarella on June 14, 2016, 05:46:09 AM
Thanks for the contribution. Always welcome. ;)

-Boofer-
Boofer!  I miss you and all the others here on the forum.  I don't have any extra milk yet for cheesemaking because of having some bottle babies this year who are drinking all the extra milk.  Once weaning happens I hope to re-enter the world of cheese and finally get a chance to use as wrapping some Redbud leaves that have been soaking in brandy for 2 years.  I'm also dealing with Lyme Disease and a couple of co-infections so my energy is limited but I'm hopeful I'll be able to make cheese anyway or be better by then.   :)
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on June 14, 2016, 04:30:51 PM
Oh Kathrin, I've missed you!  :(

I'm sorry for your Lyme trouble, but looking forward to more delightful postings from you.

I've laid off posting the past year and just tried to keep my hand in now and then. Still working to improve my interpretation of some favored cheese styles. Practice, practice, practice.... ;)

I'm looking forward to opening a Pont l'Eveque (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,15511.msg118582.html#msg118582) this Friday. Beyond that is yet another trial (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,15603.msg119276.html#msg119276) in the mix.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: reg on June 15, 2016, 07:04:01 AM
Boofer, looking forward to seeing and hearing more about this cheese.
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Tiarella on June 15, 2016, 10:19:28 AM
Oh Kathrin, I've missed you!  :(

I'm sorry for your Lyme trouble, but looking forward to more delightful postings from you.

I've laid off posting the past year and just tried to keep my hand in now and then. Still working to improve my interpretation of some favored cheese styles. Practice, practice, practice.... ;)

I'm looking forward to opening a Pont l'Eveque ([url]http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,15511.msg118582.html#msg118582[/url]) this Friday. Beyond that is yet another trial ([url]http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,15603.msg119276.html#msg119276[/url]) in the mix.

-Boofer-


I think I visited the forum at some point and looked for you and saw you were on hiatus and immediately left because it wasn't the same without you!!   ;D  I'm glad you'll be doing some cheese-making at least. Send me a message if you want to catch me up on life.  I think when I have milk to spare I'll start with soft white rind cheeses including some more shiitake Brie.  I'd like to get capable of nailing that every time I try it.  Not sure it's a possible goal but I'm going for it until it's no fun.  -Kathrin
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Duntov on July 08, 2016, 08:30:43 PM
This a is 2fer report.  First was my first Camembert with store bought P/H milk.  I didn't read the part about moving to a cooler fridge after the white mold was developed.  It over-ripened and tasted bitter with a smell of ammonia.  I have since done another with fresh raw milk and got it into a cooler fridge for aging.  It turned out great.

My second failure was a 4 gallon Stilton type blue cheese.  I had multiple problems including too much condensation in the cave that kept the rind wet for weeks.  I also am embarrassed to say that I left it out of the cave overnight in a 90 F plus garage.  The once beutiful rind turned dark brown and the internal blue mold ceased developing and turned a grey/tan color.  The taste was bitter followed by a chalky dryness.  I am now in progress with two more batches.  One with PH milk and one with full cream raw milk.



Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Boofer on July 09, 2016, 02:04:38 PM
Nice pics, John.  :)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: tashad on January 09, 2017, 10:35:44 PM
My first attempt at butterkase didn't come out quote right. I knew fairly soon that it was softer than I should be, and it just kept getting softer and softer. At least I can say that it's uniformly ripened all the way through, lol. It's very bland. I cut into it a couple of weeks ago, and at the time it was so bland that I was calling it my "nothing cheese", it has a bit more flavor now. The rind is more flavorful, but it's developed some mold and I don't know how to wash it off now that the cheese is open and oozing. The pics don't really show the ooze because I tidied it a bit before I took them. My mom and her friends have a lot of faith in me. In spite of the fact that this is all wrong, and they've never heard of reblochon, they ate both with no hesitation. :) One thing I can say about this cheese, it sure is smooth and glossy!
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Danbo on January 10, 2017, 12:08:54 AM
That's a soft buttercheese... ;-)
Title: Re: Failures I have known
Post by: Kaesfrau on January 11, 2017, 07:16:01 AM
Boofer,
Thanks for sharing, some made me laugh out loud-  as I've done something similar.  I will have to dig out my first pictures of an attempt at muenster like cheese that we dubbed the big blue monster.

The other thing i Will share, after spending time making cheese in my kitchen, I've move to a small vat (75 gal) and "forgot" where the drain was when wheying off.  I did think about something warm on my pantleg until my boot was filled with whey.  :o

Everyone here has been great about the learning process.
Kaesfrau