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GENERAL CHEESE MAKING BOARDS (Specific Cheese Making in Boards above) => INGREDIENTS - Milk Types, Formats, & Pre-Cheese Making Processing => Topic started by: oregoncurtis on August 14, 2010, 12:22:26 AM

Title: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: oregoncurtis on August 14, 2010, 12:22:26 AM
I know this is newbie question and I've been searching both this forum and google, but can't seem to find the right answer. I'm having trouble finding non homogenized milk and so I wanted to know if it's possible to make any cheeses with homogenized milk? If so which kinds. I know that mozzarella isn't possible I tried with what I though was non-homogenized, but It turned out all wrong.

I'm new to this so I apologize for asking what is probably a commonly answered question.

Thanks!

-Curtis
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: linuxboy on August 14, 2010, 12:31:34 AM
Yes, blues turn out nicely. Lactic curd turns out OK. It depends on how it's homogenized, too.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 14, 2010, 05:59:20 AM
I'd like to know how to make cheese from homogenized milk

Thanks
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Boofer on August 14, 2010, 08:31:06 AM
I'd like to know how to make cheese from homogenized milk

Thanks

You're kidding, right Alex? You're an old hand at this craft.

Except for an expensive ($10/gallon) Jack I tried recently, all of my 20 cheeses over the past year and a half have been made from pasteurized, homogenized milk bought from the store ($3.69/gallon). Certainly there are a lot finer nuances to using raw milk, and I would use it preferentially over the store stuff if I had a reasonably priced (or FREE!!) source.

To the store milk, you need to replace calcium that was lost in the processing. An added teaspoon or two of calcium chloride (CACL2) to the milk at the beginning of the make is what is required. I'm sure if you search on CACL2 here you'll find a lot of information about its role and use.

Mozzarella can be a difficult cheese to make. Use the search function to learn more about the troubles and successes with the style. I believe MrsKK's recipe has solid recommendations. Here's another thread you may find useful: http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,4127.0.html (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,4127.0.html)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Gina on August 14, 2010, 09:17:14 AM
Quote from: Boofer
Except for an expensive ($10/gallon) Jack I tried recently, all of my 20 cheeses over the past year and a half have been made from pasteurized, homogenized milk bought from the store ($3.69/gallon). Certainly there are a lot finer nuances to using raw milk, and I would use it preferentially over the store stuff if I had a reasonably priced (or FREE!!) source.
Totally agree. I've only been making cheese for a few months, but thus far all of my cheeses also have been made using generic store-bought milk. I would love to have access to higher quality milk at a reasonable price, but that isnt the case right now, and frankly in my area, I doubt it ever will be. Sadly I havent seen a live cow locally for years, and having animals of my own is out of the question.

As Boofer suggested, you can add Calcium Chloride to grocery store milk to replace lost calcium. It's not a perfect solution (no pun intended) but it really helps and you can make some nice cheeses this way. Not as nice as raw milks (or so I've heard), but quite satisfactory and enjoyable. You easily can purchase a small amount in liquid form at various cheese making sites, or look for dry and mix it yourself. I got mine (food grade) from ebay.

Good luck and have fun. :)

Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 15, 2010, 05:26:33 AM
NO, I'm not kidding at all. On one hand I am fortunate to have unlimited raw milk - cow's and goat's. On the other hand, as I teach cheese making, I want to have the opportunity to teach making cheese from store bought milk. It's illegal to sell raw milk here. All store bought milk in my country is homogenized. There are two types, pasteurized and UHT. I'd like to be able make mostly simple cheeses and may be Edam/Gouda.  I know the "trick" with the CaCl. The store bought milk has 3% fat. May some fat addition (cream) help coagulation?
I tried making cheese twice, both times I got not more than yogurt consistency. after cutting the coagulum I couldn't stir the curds, it was too soft and fragile.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: MrsKK on August 15, 2010, 07:44:57 AM
I'm with you, Alex, in wanting to learn how to make quality cheeses with homogenized milk because of the legal issues with raw milk cheeses.  And I also want to teach cheesemaking classes.  For most of the year, I have raw milk from my cow - FAR from free or even reasonably priced, considering the cost of keeping a cow, plus the work that goes into milking, feeding, and caring for her - but for the two or so months that she is dry, I am stuck with store-bought.  I basically stop drinking milk because I can't stand the taste and it gives me digestive issues.

I guess I will just have to dive in and try CaCl and store bought one of these days, because teaching the skill is a passion of mine.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: linuxboy on August 15, 2010, 10:43:09 AM
The store bought milk has 3% fat. May some fat addition (cream) help coagulation?
I tried making cheese twice, both times I got not more than yogurt consistency. after cutting the coagulum I couldn't stir the curds, it was too soft and fragile.

Cream makes it worse. Cream makes the curd weaker and it will take longer to drain. This is the case for nonhomogenized milk as well. It has to do with the PF ratio. If you add cream and it gets too much beyond 1, the curd will be soft, like stilton curd. If you want stronger curd, add protein (caseins, not whey proteins). Easiest way is dry nonfat milk. So end point is that add cream but no more than is found naturally if you want a good curd set. Naturally holstein milk has about 3.2% protein.

One of my tricks with homogenized milk is to start with a milk that has a low fat percentage, like a 1% or 2%, and then add the best commercial cream I can find to bring the fat content up to 3-4%. This has always set better for me than using regular whole milk.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 15, 2010, 11:01:49 AM
Thanks,

Experiencing the two flops was without adding cream.
I am ready to try with 1 or 2% fat milk. When and how do you add the cream?
BTW, it's also homogenized.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: linuxboy on August 15, 2010, 11:47:25 AM
I pour it in at the start of the make before adding anything. You might be limited with what you can make. Here, I have my choices of homogenized milks and they vary drastically in terms of suitability for cheesemaking. Most are no good. It might be that you will not be able to find an acceptable milk. In that case, you can always make lactic curd. Or if 2% milk works, a grana type, such as parmesan. I've had good success with adding lipase to 2% milk and making grana styles.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 15, 2010, 12:02:24 PM
Thank you LB,

As I have no choices, only one type of homo milk, I'll give it a try.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Boofer on August 15, 2010, 03:23:08 PM
One of my tricks with homogenized milk is to start with a milk that has a low fat percentage, like a 1% or 2%, and then add the best commercial cream I can find to bring the fat content up to 3-4%. This has always set better for me than using regular whole milk.
This is an intriguing point. What is the explanation...in layman's terms, please. Wouldn't they be fairly equal as far as protein content? If that really is true, wouldn't we always want to use 1% or 2% and add cream to it, rather than use whole milk?

I tried making cheese twice, both times I got not more than yogurt consistency. after cutting the coagulum I couldn't stir the curds, it was too soft and fragile.
I guess my curds are pretty much fragile shortly after cutting. It's only after they've been healed and heated that they become less so. If I'm not careful or stir too vigorously, they will shatter. That isn't the case with raw milk, huh? I do manage to get the curds to a firmer stage and am able to drain the whey and make my cheeses though and don't ever see the yogurt consistency you're referring to. Very curious.

From my perspective, the industrial milk is okay (but not optimal) and I can fashion cheeses from it. My problems are in understanding what the different processes are and the changes that the cultures and my techniques bring to my finished products.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: DeejayDebi on August 15, 2010, 07:41:37 PM
We must have good milk up here because I have made all kinds of cheeses with store bought pasteirized homodgenized milk here for 30 years using buttermilk, yogurt and Junket rennet with no Calcium chloride. The only milk that doesn't work very well for me is what they sell here at WalMart - always very soft curds and thin yogurts so I don't use it.

I have always made more Italian styled cheese (mozzarella, provalone, romano, parmensan, Crosta rosa) than anything and only in the past 2 years had access to raw milk and started using commercial cultures. Granted raw milk is soooo much better for curd formation, flavor etc., requires less rennet and gives you firmer curds but it can be done.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 16, 2010, 12:03:00 AM
The type of cheese I tried to make, is a very popular in my country, it's a fresh cheese. It is made like Camembert, even the size, a little bit more salt and of course no PC. It's eaten after drainage of 24 hours max.
The pics show a bigger one made from raw milk.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: linuxboy on August 16, 2010, 07:12:43 AM
One of my tricks with homogenized milk is to start with a milk that has a low fat percentage, like a 1% or 2%, and then add the best commercial cream I can find to bring the fat content up to 3-4%. This has always set better for me than using regular whole milk.

This is an intriguing point. What is the explanation...in layman's terms, please. Wouldn't they be fairly equal as far as protein content? If that really is true, wouldn't we always want to use 1% or 2% and add cream to it, rather than use whole milk?

Yes, the  composition by numbers is about the same. But the treatment of the fats often differs.  In whole milk, everything is pushed through the homogenizer, which both breaks up the fats and smashes them into caseins. When that smashing happens, the caseins adsorb the fat molecules. Meaning you get proteins will little chunks of fats on their surfaces, making it more difficult for them to bond to each other to form a curd. So the curd is softer. In a low fat milk that's of good quality, the proteins are still there, but are less damaged (not always the case, depends on the process). So I like to use the milk that has decent proteins, and then use non-ultra-pasteurized, gently treated cream and add it back into the milk. It's much cheaper than raw milk, and while the results aren't as good, they're better than using regular whole milk.

Boofer, around here most of the 2% milk is no good. The good milk is in white plastic containers and has an expiration date that's about two weeks into the future, even when the milk is regularly restocked. Interestingly, the whole milk that's in white plastic containers, non-UP of course, is also quite decent. I've started using that more for ease to avoid the whole issue of adding cream. Trader Joes and Whole Foods both have good whole milk (again around here, not sure about other parts of the county), usually. Either the half gallon cartons or the gallon white plastic ones. It is a little Holstein-heavy and the curd set will be a little weak, but not terrible, pretty close to what raw Holstein milk is like.

For other parts of the country, it may be the same case or it may not. In general, the protein structure of lower fat milk is better, though. I wouldn't say it's always better, but I would say it's often the case, especially with cheaper milks.

Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Mondequay on August 16, 2010, 07:15:20 AM
Hi Curtis, I have access to many brands of p&h milk where I live. I have tried every brand available and only one has made cheese. I'm happy that it's the one that I use in my coffee and pour on my children's oats! You will just have to start trying the milk you have access to and see what happens.

Alex, I love that mold! Beautiful cheese. What is it called?

Christine
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 16, 2010, 08:14:38 AM
The cheese is named after the holly ancient city of Safed (also spelled Safed, Zefat, Tsfat, Zfat, Safad, Safes, Safet, Tzfat, etc.), a center of Kabbalah, located in the Galilee in northern Israel.
The specific name is: Tzfatit = from Tzfat.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Mondequay on August 16, 2010, 08:40:19 AM
I would love to make that cheese for a friend but had no luck finding a recipe. At least not one I could read!
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: DeejayDebi on August 16, 2010, 09:23:00 PM
It looks wonderfully creamy Alex - do share the recipe for this lovely cheese please?
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 16, 2010, 11:32:14 PM
Christine and Debi,

I'll post the resipe as soon as I'll finish translating it :)
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Mondequay on August 17, 2010, 07:56:22 AM
Thanks, Alex. I am so impressed (and a little envious) of bi-lingual and multi-lingual people!
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 18, 2010, 11:23:51 AM
At last, here it is:

Tzaftit Cheese Recipe

The recipe describes the way I teach and make myself the cheese. I use raw cow’s milk.

Ingredients:

3 liters milk
3 Tb 5% vinegar
0.8 gr (3-4 flakes) CaCl diluted in water
3 ts buttermilk (store bought, containing STREPTOCOCCUS LACTIS, STREPTOCOCCUS DIACETYLACTIS and STREPTOCOCCUS CREMORIS) diluted in water
3-4 drops liquid enzyme (Maxiren 600) diluted in water
50-70 gr table salt (I use 60 gr)

2 500 cc dripping moulds (like for Camembert)

1. Heat milk to 72-74ºC.
2. Cool instantly to 40-42 ºC.
3. Add and stir one by one, vinegar, CaCl, buttermilk and enzyme.
4. Cover and let set for 30-60 minutes, check for a clean break.
5. Cut curd into 1-1.5 cm size cubes.
6. Let stand for 8 minutes.
7. Stir gently and complete cutting.
8. Let stand for 5 minutes.
9. Stir gently (longer then previously) to expel whey and prevent curds from matting.
10. Let stand for 3 minutes to settle curds.
11. Drain whey to about 1 cm about curds’ level.
12. Add the salt and stir to incorporate and dissolve it.
13. Transfer curds equally into 2 moulds.
14. Let drain for 12-16 hours flipping as the curds in the moulds start to mat and solidify. As more flipping, faster draining.
15. Store in the refrigerator for up to 10 days, may be even for 14 days.

You may use a bigger mould 3600 cc for 9-10 liters of milk.

Note: After salting, you may drain most of the whey and add Nigella Seeds, Sesame Seeds, Dill, Chopped Olives, etc. 



Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Mondequay on August 18, 2010, 12:11:21 PM
Thanks for the recipe Alex. I can't wait to try it!  :)
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Boofer on August 19, 2010, 01:13:31 AM
So I like to use the milk that has decent proteins, and then use non-ultra-pasteurized, gently treated cream and add it back into the milk.
Getting non-ultra-pasteurized cream is difficult. I've had pretty good success with all of the Darigold products in Tacoma: 1%, 2%, and whole milk. I would like to try their 1 or 2% and add the cream (non-UHT) back to it to see what difference it might make. I will also check the Trader Joes in my area.

Thanks for that.

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Gina on August 19, 2010, 11:00:29 AM
So I like to use the milk that has decent proteins, and then use non-ultra-pasteurized, gently treated cream and add it back into the milk.
Getting non-ultra-pasteurized cream is difficult. I've had pretty good success with all of the Darigold products in Tacoma: 1%, 2%, and whole milk. I would like to try their 1 or 2% and add the cream (non-UHT) back to it to see what difference it might make. I will also check the Trader Joes in my area.

In my area (SoCal), Trader Joe's carries pasteurized but not homoginized milk, though they dont call it 'cream line'. IIRC, it's about $4/2 quarts. TJ's cream is UP, but Costco's isnt.

(TJ's here also carries goat's milk that is not UP.)

If you add cream to lower fat milk to get to whole, what is the formula? Guess that depends on the per cent fat in the cream and milk, ...and math will be involved. ;) What is the usual per cent of fat in whole milk? 4%?
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: linuxboy on August 19, 2010, 11:08:59 AM
3.2-3.5% fat
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Gina on August 19, 2010, 11:11:38 AM
Hmm, decimal points. Guess that means higher math.

Thanks. ;)
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: oregoncurtis on August 19, 2010, 02:32:26 PM
Thanks for all the replies everyone. Would anyone be able to link to a recipe good for a beginner that will work with homogenized milk? I'm not up on all the cheese lingo (styles, science, etc.) so it would be a great help. I have rennet and citric acid on hand so preferably a recipe that won't require any more special ingredients (calcium).

-Curtis
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: DeejayDebi on August 21, 2010, 10:25:03 PM
Really looks tasty Alex thank you. I am wondering would this also be called Zfatit by any chance?
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 22, 2010, 12:40:26 PM
This is Tzfatit' except the type of milk.
Hameiri dairy established in Tzfat before 160 years, being the first dairy in Israel, was the first to make this type of cheese, but from sheep's' milk until today.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Boofer on August 22, 2010, 02:38:49 PM
Cream makes it worse. Cream makes the curd weaker and it will take longer to drain. This is the case for nonhomogenized milk as well. It has to do with the PF ratio. If you add cream and it gets too much beyond 1, the curd will be soft, like stilton curd. If you want stronger curd, add protein (caseins, not whey proteins). Easiest way is dry nonfat milk. So end point is that add cream but no more than is found naturally if you want a good curd set. Naturally holstein milk has about 3.2% protein.

One of my tricks with homogenized milk is to start with a milk that has a low fat percentage, like a 1% or 2%, and then add the best commercial cream I can find to bring the fat content up to 3-4%. This has always set better for me than using regular whole milk.
So it occurred to me that I could do 3 gallons of 1% past&homo milk ($3.69/gal) and add 1 gallon of raw whole milk ($9.99/gal). This would be a more affordable solution that might approach what linuxboy referenced and improve the overall quality of the final product compared to my normal all p&h milk. I'm not certain what the end result would be for the PF ratio. This would also get around the problem of not finding non-ultrapasteurized cream.

Oooh, that sounds like a good plan! I can't wait to try it. But what cheese to try it with? Decisions, decisions....  :)

-Boofer-
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Gina on August 22, 2010, 04:35:36 PM
So it occurred to me that I could do 3 gallons of 1% past&homo milk ($3.69/gal) and add 1 gallon of raw whole milk ($9.99/gal). This would be a more affordable solution that might approach what linuxboy referenced and improve the overall quality of the final product compared to my normal all p&h milk. I'm not certain what the end result would be for the PF ratio. This would also get around the problem of not finding non-ultrapasteurized cream.

Oooh, that sounds like a good plan! I can't wait to try it. But what cheese to try it with? Decisions, decisions....  :)

-Boofer-
That's exactly what I set out to do yesterday - buy one gallon of raw milk to add to 3 gallons of generic grocery store stuff. But alas the only raw milk I have seen locally was not $5-ish as I had thought, but rather $8.19 for 2 quarts. No way am I going to experiment with a gallon of $16+ milk at my skill level, lol.

If you try that mix, please let us know how that works out, Boofer. I'm very curious and if I knew it worked.... :)
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: DeejayDebi on August 24, 2010, 06:26:26 PM
Go for it Boofer! Should work nicely. I have done this when the ole budget was out of whack (like during tax season) an it works pretty well. Also helps to get my 5% raw milk down in fat for parms.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Mondequay on August 26, 2010, 03:06:34 PM
Alex, I made the Tzaftit today. I planned to use fresh raw cow milk but ran out of time and used p&h instead. The curds were very soft and it is hard for me to imagine turning this. It seems that it may be a dump and pour situation!  ;) I'm kicking myself a little but at least I know the results and tomorrow I will head out to the farm! Thanks again for the recipe!
Christine
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 27, 2010, 01:34:47 AM
Christine, this is the cheese I tried to make from store bought milk with same result as yours. I should have mention: "Don't try this at home" ;).
I'm sure you'll be rewarded using raw milk, it's a very good breakfest cheese.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Mondequay on August 27, 2010, 07:31:27 AM
Hahaha, Alex, I wonder if I would have listened! It tastes great just not holding together very well. I'm sure we will polish it off with some tomatoes from the garden.

A couple questions:Why are we heating to 72C? Any issue with using less salt? If using fresh milk, do you still use the CaCl?
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Alex on August 27, 2010, 10:32:37 AM
Quote
Why are we heating to 72C?
That's the temp I pasteurize the raw milk.
Quote
Any issue with using less salt?
50-70 gr is a recommendation. I wouldn't use less than 50 gr, because salt acts also as preservative. As salt is added before complete draining of the whey, not all of it is absorbed into the curds. As I stated in the recipe, we like it with 60 gr. Of-course you may adjust the salt per your personal taste.
Quote
If using fresh milk, do you still use the CaCl?
Yes, I use just a pinch (0.8-1.0 gr/3 l milk), because of the 72 deg C.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: woodsman on August 28, 2010, 09:57:20 AM
So it occurred to me that I could do 3 gallons of 1% past&homo milk ($3.69/gal) and add 1 gallon of raw whole milk ($9.99/gal). This would be a more affordable solution that might approach what linuxboy referenced and improve the overall quality of the final product compared to my normal all p&h milk. I'm not certain what the end result would be for the PF ratio. This would also get around the problem of not finding non-ultrapasteurized cream.

Oooh, that sounds like a good plan! I can't wait to try it. But what cheese to try it with? Decisions, decisions....  :)

-Boofer-
That's exactly what I set out to do yesterday - buy one gallon of raw milk to add to 3 gallons of generic grocery store stuff. But alas the only raw milk I have seen locally was not $5-ish as I had thought, but rather $8.19 for 2 quarts. No way am I going to experiment with a gallon of $16+ milk at my skill level, lol.

If you try that mix, please let us know how that works out, Boofer. I'm very curious and if I knew it worked.... :)


It's amazing how it works in less developed countries. Here a gallon of raw milk cost 2.5 USD/gal while P&H store milk goes for 7.75 USD a gallon.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Mondequay on August 28, 2010, 10:09:33 AM
It is very interesting the price difference, Woodsman. I drove to my local farm yesterday (30 miles) to buy raw cow milk for $6.50/gal and the cooler was empty. I knocked on the door to find out that a "government official" was occupying the farmer and he didn't have time to fill the cooler yet. My husband and I took Louis Pasteur's name in vain all the way back to the car!

BTW, we can buy big name brands here for about $2/gal and a local pasteurized brand for $4/gal.
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: oyster_catcher on February 06, 2013, 04:28:20 AM
I'm a newbie too. I haven't yet found non-homogenized milk where I live. This discussion is a great education for me.

So far I tried a lactic acid coagulated curd cheese with Sainsburys organic whole milk and the curds and whey had not separated after 12 hours at room temperature, it was just yoghurt really. So I stirred in 1/4tsp rennet per litre thinking the recipe had oddly missed this out (later learning that rennet shouldn't be needed). Anyway it turned out very well and made a great cheesecake but I'm aware I strayed from the recipe and will try CaCl and low fat milk + cream next time.

On another attempt I tried Sainsburys non-organic Gold Top milk (still homogenized) to make a Coulommiers cheese (from Rita Ash's book), this looked to be a very rich milk. This gave a very good firm curd which I was able to ladle easily. The yield was very high. Like 1/3 curd and 2/3 whey.

Theres a lot of learning and experimenting to do, but its great fun!
Title: Re: Milk, Cow's - Using Homogenized In Cheese Making?
Post by: Ramon777 on January 10, 2015, 02:02:05 PM
Where can I get the zfatit cheese mold. We make our own cheese at home from raw milk and we live in the US.