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CHEESE TYPE BOARDS (for Cheese Lovers and Cheese Makers) => RENNET COAGULATED - Semi-Hard "Sweet" Washed Curd => Topic started by: JeffHamm on December 27, 2011, 08:27:44 PM

Title: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on December 27, 2011, 08:27:44 PM
Hi,

I made a gouda this time last year, and it's just being nibbled on now.  It is so tasty that I figure it's worth having another one sitting around for some time.  So, I've made one today and it's now in the press for over night.  The knit was very good, though it's a bit water logged feeling.  I realised I should have broken the curds up to drain them a bit before putting them in the mold as they tend to retain water and whey.  Still, things went fairly well so I'm hoping this will be a tasty one when we cut into it.  Not sure if it will last a full year, but will aim for 6 months or so.

- Jeff

Gouda  Dec 28th, 2011
Indoor Temp 210C, overcast, Barometer: med. high pressure
10 litres Homebrand Standard
2 ice cube buttermilk 1 ice cube FD
1.65 ml calf rennet
½ tsp CaCl
1)   Warm to 32 C (time 10:55 am Temp 32.7 C)
2)   Add starter (melt cubes)
3)   Ripen 15 min (start time 10:58 finish time 11:15 temp 32.7 C)
4)   Add rennet (time: 11:15:30 floc time 11:27 11 m 30sec 3x multiplier cut time 11:50:05)
5)   Cut into 1 cm cubes
6)   Let stand 10 minutes (start time 11:55 - 12:05 temp 32.0 C)
7)   Drain 1/3 whey
8)   Add 80 C water until temp 33.3 C (start time ??:?? finish 12:26 temp 35.1.? C)
9)   Rest 20 minutes (start time 12:26 finish time 12:46)
10)   Drain to level of curds
11)   Add 55 C to reach temp 37 C (start time ??:?? end 12:48 temp 37.1 C)
12)   Rest 30 minutes (start time 12:48 finish time  1:18)
13)   Drain whey
14)   Move curds to mold
15)   Press under 10 kg 30 minutes (start time 1:30 finish time 2:00)
16)   Flip and redress
17)   Press under 20 kg 1 hour (start time 2:04 finish time 3:04)
18)   Flip and redress press (30 kg 2.15 PSI) (start time 3:08 – 7:50 pm)
19)   Flip and redress press (35.2kg 2.53 PSI, start 7:58 – 6:05 am; 1360g, 15.5 x 5.8 cm = 1.24 g/cm3)
20)   Place in saturated brine for 1 hour per lb per inch of height (start time 6:19 finish time 1.09)
21)   Air dry then cave.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on December 27, 2011, 09:12:50 PM
You could store it in my cave... I'll keep safe for you... honest!  ;)
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: pliezar (Ian) on December 27, 2011, 09:41:39 PM
I you vacuum seal it, you can have de-motivational sayings on the bag to keep it "safe"  or you could send it my way and I will let you "visit it" in 6 months and watch me eat it allow you to sample it and then put it back for another 6 months.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on December 27, 2011, 10:34:15 PM
Wow!  Thanks for such kind offers.  I'm touched.  .... who was that who just touched me?  Stop it! :)

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on December 28, 2011, 11:51:50 AM
Here's the gouda pre-brine and pre-wrapping before shipping! :)  It weighed in at 1360g, and was 15.5 cm across and 5.8 cm tall, for a density of 1.24 g/cm3.  Using the weight and height, it suggests a  brine time of 6 hours 50 minutes (1 hour per pound per inch of height).  The knit is fantastic.  So, once it air dries and gets a decent time in the cave, I'll be waxing this for longer storage.  Hmmm, I seem to be saying that a lot these days.  Next year should be a good cheese year, well, the end of next year at least! :)

- Jeff

Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: Cheesemkr on December 28, 2011, 11:59:36 AM
Great looking cheese, a lot nicer than mine.  I can't get mine to knit like yours, maybe after a few more tries.  What kind of molds are you using?

Andy
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on December 28, 2011, 12:12:30 PM
Thanks Cheesemkr,

The knits on my cheeses have really improved once I increased my pressing weights.  I can now get up to 2.5 PSI, which is not huge, but combined with Sailor's tip of pressing in the pot (put the mold in the pot, which is kept in a warm water bath, and press; easy for me since I just stack weights) it really seems to get the job done.  The mold I'm using is just a basic cyllendar type, measuring 16 x 16 cm.  Also, working on my cheese cloth control has helped.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: Cheesemkr on December 28, 2011, 12:34:53 PM
Jeff,

Do you have have photos of your pressing system?

Andy
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on December 28, 2011, 02:24:45 PM
Hi Cheesemkr,

I just stack weights on top, as shown in this thread:

http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,8362.msg58699.html#msg58699 (http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,8362.msg58699.html#msg58699)

The mortar and pestle weigh 5.2 kg, and I have 2 small weights (2.5 kg each) and 5 larger weights (5 kg each), so when it's all stacked it comes to 35.2 kg, on a 6.25" mold, which gives me about 2.5 PSI.  I use Duplo, which is large Leggo, to create a platform on which to stack the weights and to prevent things tipping over.  This works really well for me.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on January 13, 2012, 11:40:34 PM
Hi,

Well, this has air dried and spent some time in the cave, about 2.5 weeks since make day.  It picked up some b.linen contamination.  Ever since I added b.linens to a butterkase all my cheeses since have picked them up.  I was getting wild ones on occasion as well, but now they're everywhere.  Oh well, they add a touch of colour to the rind.  I just keep brushing them and they seem happy enough.  Anyway, since this one is intended for next Christmas time (note, intended allows for changes of plans) it was time for it to get a wax job.  So, here it is just before the procedure.  It weighed in at 1164g, and (apart from the b.linens), it's keeping itself nicely clean looking.  Two small dark spots on one side, and one on the other.  Nothing like the spotting I used to get last year.  I wish I knew what it was I've learned?  Anyway, the waxing went well.  So, it will be some time (I hope) before this sees the light of day again, at least while naked.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on January 14, 2012, 01:37:08 PM
Yummy, an aged gouda.  I need to put one aside as well.  I only recently discovered by accident just how good an aged gouda was!  :P
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on January 14, 2012, 01:59:33 PM
Yes.  It takes on whole new flavour characteristics, which are just fantastic.  I had some locally made 18 month gouda a while back that was superb.  I've got just over 1/2 of a wheel that's just over a year, and I might try and keep some of it, maybe 1/4 wheel, to age out for awhile.  It's turned out very nice, and I would like to see how it does once it hits "vintage" status. :) I've got lots of other cheeses to bide my time with, and some others are starting to reach their testing ages, so I can distract myself from it.  Might work. 

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on January 14, 2012, 02:49:06 PM
Waiting is tough I know, but someone has to set a good example for others to follow.  Might as well be you!  ;)
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on March 24, 2012, 03:02:03 PM
Wax On, wax off!

I was giving this one it's weekly flip and noticed it felt quite soft, despite being waxed!  Sure enough, upon removing the wax to see what was going on it was exceptionally wet, as in pour off the water wet.  Hmmmm, I've had a few cheeses now that have been expelling moisture after waxing.  This one had air dried and cave'sd for 2.5 weeks, but it obviously wasn't ready.  I've got it drying again and once it's ready for wax on again.  It now weights 1112g, and it was 1164g when it was originally waxed.  It's lost some moisture over night as well as the water that poured off. 

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on March 24, 2012, 05:07:44 PM
That was happening to me a lot to, both with wax and vacuum packing.  So far the cheese cream I'm using has worked better then both, as it breaths.  Time will tell if this is truly a good solution.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on March 24, 2012, 05:14:22 PM
Hi anut,

I think the problem was I was trying to get a bunch of cheeses into long term storage a bit too quickly.  I wanted to have the ripening boxes free for more immediate cheese (now there's an oxymoron for you) and so I was waxing before they had really air dried sufficiently.  Oh well, once it dries out again, this time properly, it should be fine. 

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: MacGruff on March 25, 2012, 10:03:11 AM
What is "proper" for a Gouda?  You mentioned that you had air-dried this one for about two and a half weeks, and yet still had it expelling moisture...

I've got a Gouda that I made one week ago that is in the "cave" and feels very dry to the touch. I was planning on giving it one more week before putting it in a vacuum bag, but given your experience, I am choose to wait a bit longer...

Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on March 25, 2012, 01:13:10 PM
Hi MacGruff,

If you're going to vac seal, and you think it's dry enough now, then go for it.  Check the bag for moisture each day.  If it releases moisture you'll see it much sooner than I did.  The best way to find the sweet spot (not too early, not too late) is to keep trying until you get a feel for it.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: MacGruff on March 27, 2012, 05:16:00 PM
Thanks JeffHamm,

I decided to wait a bit more before sealing my cheese. Yesterday, when I went to flip it, I noticed a couple of black spots of mold on one face. I immediately wiped them off using a cheesecloth dipped in vinegar, and then sprinkled some salt on the spots and put it back in the "cave".  I noticed this morning that the humidity in my cave went from about 90% to 78% which I ascribe to the salt. This evening, I flipped the cheese again (no recurrence of the black spots) but that face was feeling a bit moist and the humidity in the cave is back at 91%.

Not sure how to interpret all of that, so I will keep to the regimen of daily flipping and decide on how to proceed during the weekend given what happens.

Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: T-Bird on March 30, 2012, 05:33:14 PM
Jeff that is a great looking cheese! I have had the same problems with a gouda looking and feeling dry, then developing moisture in the vacuum bag. They are a very attractive way for the homecheese maker to store his cheese, but I've had trouble making them work.Anut, what is this "cheese cream"?
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on March 31, 2012, 11:54:20 AM
Hi T-Bird,

Cheese cream / cream wax:  Non-petroleum cream wax with, or without, mold inhibitors (Natamycin or Sorbate). Excellent for brushing on hard cheeses with or without adding the melted hard wax afterwards.

I'm using two coats of cheese cream without mold inhibitors.   It's very easy to apply and so far it's been working well.  It breaths enough that the cheeses don't get moist on you, or haven't yet... knock on wood.  It adheres to the cheese well, but will still peel off, so you don't lose the rind.  The only problem I've run into is it seems to stay slightly tacky and if you put another cheese on top that is also coated in the stuff, they will try to stick to each other.  I put separators between my cheeses now so as not to damage the cream coating. 
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: T-Bird on March 31, 2012, 07:43:02 PM
Anut, where do you get this stuff? I've heard of people oiling their rinds, I was afraid if I used the wrong kind of oil, it would rancidify over time.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on March 31, 2012, 08:16:34 PM
Hi T-Bird,

I got mine from Hoeggers, and I noticed it on theCheesemaker.com as well.  I think it just gets overlooked.  You paint it on and let it dry.  It feels like thin plastic when dry. 
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: T-Bird on April 01, 2012, 08:26:22 PM
Thank you Anut. I buy from Hoegger too, very nice people! They are only about 75 miles from me. I will call tomorrow.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: T-Bird on April 02, 2012, 06:20:11 PM
anut,sorry, I went to hoeggar web site, found the coating, says it is for applying before waxing. Do you use it alone? I apologize for changing the subject of this thread.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on April 02, 2012, 06:55:25 PM
Yes, I'm using 2 coats cheese cream and no wax as I want the cheese to be able to breath.  That way they will continue to mature and slowly drop weight as if they were natural rinds without the work of maintaining the rind!  This is something new I just started out of frustration with cheeses developing moisture under wax or in vac bags.  If you stack cheeses, put dividers between them as the stuff likes stick to itself even after it's dried. 
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on April 04, 2012, 02:12:16 PM
Hi,

Well, this has been in the cave drying off for a while, and it's now down to 1052g.  It is very tempting to just cut into it and be done with it, but I resisted (having the Lancashire at the ready was a good plan I think).  It's been rewaxed and we'll have another go at aging this out a year or so.  Had a taste of the other aged gouda, which is now 16 months, and it's very good.  This, hopefully, will be the replacement. 

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on April 04, 2012, 06:16:36 PM
It's exciting waiting for a long term cheese!  :P
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: T-Bird on April 04, 2012, 07:01:30 PM
Jeff, how long will you wait before bagging again? I think I am going to try the cheese cream on my next gouda. anut, how long do you wait between coats?
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on April 04, 2012, 07:10:12 PM
Hi T-Bird,

I won't have to bag this one again as I waxed it.  Or, do you mean how long would I wait after making a cheese before bagging/waxing it?  I think I'll probably wait a minimum of 3 or 4 weeks from now on.  Actually, I'll probably base it upon moisture loss and wait until the cheese is between 1000 and 1100g, and also good and dry to the touch.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: anutcanfly on April 04, 2012, 09:10:48 PM
I wait about 3 days between coats.  You do have to be careful that the cheese's rind is fully dry same as you would for wax, so you will want to wait a few weeks. 
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: MacGruff on April 05, 2012, 06:45:53 PM
Hey guys,

I have a Gouda that I made almost three weeks ago and I have been contemplating when to put it in the vacuum seal bag. It's been in the cave in temp and humidity to age and has lost weight. I just flipped it again today and noted that one side (the bottom) was still feeling wet to the touch. Based on your comments above I think I should let it wait some more in the cave. Right?

Thanks for the help!
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: DeejayDebi on April 05, 2012, 07:49:13 PM
3 weeks and it's still wet?
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: MacGruff on April 06, 2012, 07:25:47 AM
Yes. One side - the bottom. It's sitting on a plastic cheese mat...

 ???

Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: DeejayDebi on April 06, 2012, 09:49:34 PM
Keep turning it everyday
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: MacGruff on April 08, 2012, 02:02:55 PM
I think I figured it out. The cheese "cave" I am using is a dorm fridge. Well, it has glass shelves and the plastic mat I was resting the cheese on was resting on top of the glass shelf. The residual moisture in the fridge was condensating on the glass and pooling under the cheese. Once I propper up the mat to be slightly above the shelf - thereby letting air circulate - AND wiped the shelf off, the "wet" cheese dried out...   ??? :-[

Anyway, I weighed it again today and it is at 2 lb 10 Oz. It is my nicest looking block of cheese and is starting to develop the white fuzzy kind of mold I see in pictures here regularly. Today marks three weeks since I made it and so it went into the vacuum bag. I will let it sit for another 6 weeks at least before tasting it. Can't wait!!!

 A)
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: DeejayDebi on April 08, 2012, 10:22:50 PM
oh that would do it!
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on April 10, 2012, 06:27:01 PM
Yes, condensation will fool you!  Sounds like you've got things under control now though.  I would try and stretch that cheese out to at least 3 months (12 weeks), and if you can stand it, go for 4 months.  Gouda really does need a bit of time to really shine.  Try making caerphilly as in six weeks you could be into your 2nd of those if you made one now and the ohter in 3 weeks!  Caerphilly is a great cheese in its own right, but it is also very helpful in aging other cheeses.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: MacGruff on April 11, 2012, 06:04:20 PM
12 weeks, JeffHamm   :(   :(   :-\   ...  well, I'll try. No promises though!   >:D

Caerphilly, eh? I've recently tasted a British Caerphilly (I think it was Welsh, actually) which tasted just like mushrooms. It was great!!! 

I am curious about your last remark though: "...it is also very helpful in aging other cheeses." Is that because it can be eaten much younger, so the temptation to eat the others is reduced? Or, did you have something else in mind?

Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on April 11, 2012, 07:43:01 PM
Hi MacGruff,

It helps by distraction, you can eat it while the others age.  So yes, it's a temptation reduction cheese.  It's also very good in my opinion.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on May 17, 2013, 06:04:18 PM
Hi,

Well, this is about 17 or so months old, so I thought I would remove the wax.  It's now at 1026 g, and despite air drying it a couple times, it was still wet under the wax.  All much cheeses are wet under the wax.  Anyway, will let this dry out.  Will probably get a taste tomorrow though.  Mmmmmmm, aged gouda (at least, I hope it's Mmmmmm! It's a long time to wait for a yuck! :) )

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: jwalker on May 18, 2013, 10:18:07 AM
So? , it's now tomorrow , was it good?

I love aged Gouda , I have three aging right now , but they all kept getting mold under the wax , so I un-waxed them and re-coated with the cream coating and they seem to be OK now.

I hope to eat one at 6 months , one at 12 months , and one at 18 months.

I will start a few more in the meantime.

I wish I could taste yours right now , I am so envious , I haven't even been making cheese for 17 months!

Cheers , Jim.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: CheeWilly on May 18, 2013, 11:44:59 AM
I`m with jwalker, the suspense is killing me.  I have 2 goudas that are aging also.  I waxed both of them, they too developed mold under the wax so I pulled the wax, wiped off the mold with vinegar and salt, then coated with coconut oil per Tiarella based on the luck she has had.  One of the gouda`s was wet also on the bottom when the wax was pulled.  So they are both going to get flipped for some time daily.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on May 19, 2013, 01:12:30 PM
Hi,

Sorry for the anticipa......................tion, but I shared this with friends at their place for supper.  Was a big hit.  Still very moist, and as you can see, the paste has some mechanical holes, etc.  Still, it has a very good flavour, sharp but creamy too.  I like it! :)

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: CheeWilly on May 19, 2013, 02:51:37 PM
A cheese for the wait.  The gouda looks superb.  I just recently tried a hard gouda that was superb.  It was store bought, but the rind was chewy in a good way and the cheese was sharp and tasty.  The cheese had the consistency of a Cheddar inside but the taste of a gouda.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on May 19, 2013, 03:57:03 PM
Yes, the aged goudas that I've had before are all quite hard and chewy.  This one is crumbly, but the paste is also creamy.  I know that sounds like a contradiction, but it cracks and crumbles when you cut it yet the mouth feel is smooth and wonderful.  What I might try is aging one out for four to six months as a natural rind, then wax it.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: bbracken677 on May 19, 2013, 04:51:35 PM
So this one is about 5 months?

I looks nice and creamy...your description is spurring me on to make another for my cave to age out. I am thinking of making 2...one for about 6 months and the other to age out to a year. Perhaps this coming week I will find the time  :)
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on May 19, 2013, 06:09:20 PM
This one is about 17 months! :)

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: bbracken677 on May 19, 2013, 06:37:56 PM
 :o    oooohh...yes, I must look at more than just the month. Nice job aging this one out!  Holy Cow's Milk, Batman!

Gotta give ya a cheese for that...you earned it!
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: MacGruff on June 07, 2013, 03:10:03 PM
Since you mention that it was crumbly, I wonder if others had seen the article by CheeseNerd that talks about how to make our chesses less crumbly? It stated that extra acidification was causing the crumbliness and to combat it, suggested reducing the floc times or other durations when the bacteria are doing their thing.

My longer-stored cheeses also come out crumbly and I am tempted to try this recommendation to see if it would change this "feature". However, I am also a bit confused, in other parts of the forum I've seen where it's stated that the larger floc time and/or multiplier used, the more moisture is RETAINED....  I would have thought it would be the other way around, so I'll ask the experts in this area... what do you say?
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on June 08, 2013, 01:45:40 PM
I don't have a pH meter, so it is possible that the acidity levels were higher than optimal.  Also, using ice cubes of starter could allow one to adjust the ripening period, although in this case my notes indicate it was only 15 minutes.  However, as I add the cubes when the milk is cold, they are thawing and working during the time it takes to warm the milk up as well, and that's probably another 15-20 minutes.  I'm not sure the floc time is the one I would adjust, for, as you mention, that's important with respect to final moisture content.  Rather, cooking times, ripening times, and determining when it should go into the brine are probably points where one can adjust things.  Use of  pH meter to determine these "on to the next step" points shifts one away from time based make protocols (much like using the floc method moves one away from a clock based cutting time).  I would base things on pH, but, alas, I am meterless.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: jwalker on June 09, 2013, 09:33:56 AM
Yes, the aged goudas that I've had before are all quite hard and chewy.  This one is crumbly, but the paste is also creamy.  I know that sounds like a contradiction, but it cracks and crumbles when you cut it yet the mouth feel is smooth and wonderful.

- Jeff

That sounds to me , like the perfect Gouda.

The best ones I have had , fit that description as well.

A cheese to you !

Cheers , Jim.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: JeffHamm on October 31, 2013, 04:41:06 PM
I'm eating the last piece of this one now.  It's still very good.  Almost 2 years old.  I have to work on my gouda makes to get them consistent, then I'll definitely age another for long term.  Got lucky with this one I think.

- Jeff
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: fredthecat on April 21, 2015, 12:01:35 PM
Hope it's okay to bump. I followed this recipe and made a gouda. I brined it and it's been drying out for 2 days in a fridge, wrapped in dry cheesecloth. After how many days should I put it inside my cheesecave?
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: Stinky on April 21, 2015, 12:04:03 PM
Hope it's okay to bump. I followed this recipe and made a gouda. I brined it and it's been drying out for 2 days in a fridge, wrapped in dry cheesecloth. After how many days should I put it inside my cheesecave?

Soon as it is dry and not moist. Two days should be fine.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: fredthecat on April 23, 2015, 10:33:08 AM
thanks, haha sorry for one more noob question but. should i take off the cheesecloth i cover it in while it's resting? it's been in the cave for 2 days and was made 5 days ago.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: awakephd on April 23, 2015, 11:16:58 AM
Fred (or, if Fred is the cat, should that be "Fred's servant" -- as someone who lives with two cats, I know how the hierarchy really works!) --

There really is not a right or wrong way to do this; it is a question of what works for you in your particular setting. I would guess that leaving the cheesecloth on will slow down the loss of moisture a little. That might be a good thing if your cave is a bit dry ... or it might lead to more / more agressive mold if your cave is not so dry.

FWIW, my "cave" is a bit on the dry side (75% RH), but I do not leave a cheesecloth on my cheeses. If a cheese needs more moisture, I use a ripening box; otherwise, I just let the rinds dry as they will. I still generally have to deal with mold from time to time; a paper towel with some white wine on it scrubs it right off.  For longer-aging cheeses, where I am concerned about them getting too dry, I generally wax or vacuum-bag once they are at least dry to the touch. If I want a thicker rind (which I like), I may wait a month or more before bagging/waxing.

In the year-and-a-half that I have been involved in this hobby, I have come to learn that very little is absolutely right or wrong when it comes to any part of the cheese making. The question is whether you like what you get at the end, and whether or not you can more-or-less repeat that result -- and learning how to adjust to get what you want. So far, out of the nearly 50 cheeses I've made, none have been inedible (hopefully I have not just jinxed myself!), but I've had some that did not come out the way I really wanted them to. Gradually I have learned how to adjust to get closer to what I am aiming for. As an example, my earlier goudas tasted okay, but were very crumbly and just not very gouda-like. But I have high hopes for the one that is 6 weeks along in aging now -- sharply reducing the length of time in the press kept it from over-acidifying (= crumbly texture), and when I sampled a bit just a few days ago, it seems like it is going to be much closer to what I am aiming for.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: fredthecat on April 26, 2015, 08:26:25 AM
thanks for the advice. this time around it seems to be working out well. ill post a pic of my gouda very soon.
Title: Re: My 3rd Gouda
Post by: Boofer on April 26, 2015, 10:47:08 AM
thanks for the advice. this time around it seems to be working out well. ill post a pic of my gouda very soon.
Hey Fred, when you post your pics, why not start your own thread?  :-\

-Boofer-