Author Topic: Propagating Or Inoculating Blue (Penicllium roqueforti) Mold  (Read 2487 times)

Offline ibejaminben

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I have a question. Can you propagate the mold that you have bought to keep it alive. You pay 25.00 for a package of penicilium roforttium (didn't spell that right) and i just wanted to know if you can reproduce them or propagate them?
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Propagating Or Inoculating Blue (Penicllium roqueforti) Mold
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2009, 11:53:20 PM »
I don't see why not they were originally naturally occuring in the caves they just inject them now a days to rush the process. To keep them from contamination would probably take a lab but you could always try.

Online linuxboy

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Re: Propagating Or Inoculating Blue (Penicllium roqueforti) Mold
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2009, 12:01:35 AM »
Yes, though it's too much trouble for most people to do it properly. You need a lab to have repeatable results. If you're really, really serious and are willing to buy some lab equipment, I can post common processes... but even then I'd recommend getting lab training.

Many people save bits of their previous cheeses with p roqueforti, puree with some milk, and use that as inoculant.
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Offline joyofcheese

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Re: Propagating Or Inoculating Blue (Penicllium roqueforti) Mold
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2009, 06:55:37 PM »
I have been told by a local cheese making expert that before blue mold was available for purchase she used to use a well veined, walnut sized piece of cheap store bought blue cheese dissolved in a cup of her warm milk as an inoculant.

I too was put off by paying $25 for a packet of mold. You might want to check out www.thecheesemaker.com, as he has blue mold he sells for $14.97 shipped. I was told also that you only need a very small amount of mold spores for a 2 gal batch, like 1/32nd to 1/16 tsp. One packet of mold should make at least 20 batches at that measurement.

I am just starting out in my cheese making hobby, but this is what I have heard from reliable sources. I have one blue cheese that is 2 weeks old, was inoculated with store bought cheese, and currently has a light blue coat. I just started a stilton with 1/32 tsp of mold from thecheesemaker.com and at 4 days have not seen mold yet, but I am sure it will be there.

Offline ibejaminben

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Re: Propagating Or Inoculating Blue (Penicllium roqueforti) Mold
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2009, 11:18:57 PM »
Thanks Alot for the info. I too am starting my cheese journey. I made cream cheese first. then a batch of chedder and next a batch of mozzarella. I bought a bunch of bacteria and molds, and i now propagate my own mother cultures. The next step is try some mold cheeses but i wanted to propagate those as well. I hear alot about stilton cheese so maybe i will try that. Can't say i have every eaten it though. At least i have han gorgonzola, and blue. Thanks Again
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Offline Cyn

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Re: Propagating Or Inoculating Blue (Penicllium roqueforti) Mold
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2009, 03:37:59 PM »
Well here is a link to a step-by-step for making it using store-bought blue... http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Blue-Cheese

That looks to be copied from Fankhauser's...or the other way 'round. But his site is really useful if you are just starting out: http://biology.clc.uc.edu/fankhauser/cheese/blue_cheese/blue_cheese.htm

Mind you, I have never done it that way. I use P roq. from thecheesemaker.com, and his recommended recipe as well (mostly...) but this would certainly be an inexpensive way to try it. A culture pack of P roq. makes a whole lotta cheese - 1/16th tsp for up to 4 gal I think. I have one packet and I've made probably 20 gallons of milk into blue cheeses, and I've hardly made a dent in it.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Propagating Or Inoculating Blue (Penicllium roqueforti) Mold
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2009, 05:07:12 PM »
Hats off to the Mr. F. again!

•Website of David B. Fankhauser, PhD - Original source of this information. Shared with permission.


Offline Tomer1

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Re: Propagating Or Inoculating Blue (Penicllium roqueforti) Mold
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2011, 02:20:14 PM »
I just propogated some PR,
I used a piece of hard crust WW sourdough boule ,perhaps 250 grams in size.
Made a slit down the center so oxygen can easly penetrate the core of the bread and smeared a smidge of blue cheese inside and out. The crust doesnt develope mold (too dry) but the crumb.
I also put it the delly paper wrap which had alot of blue smeared on it in the bag,sealed the plastic bag and poked some small holes to let oxygen in and put it in my 4c since it was too hot that week.
A week later temp droped a bit so I left it outside,I had to spray some water with an atomizer to increase moisture since the bread was too dry to begin with.
Few days later green mold began to form (also few tiny speks of white which I removed) and once the crumb was completly covered I opened the bag and let the bread dry and become brittle.

The mold has penetrated the crumb completly not just the surface,
I used a knife holding the bread above a plastic bag to capture the dust and small blue crumbs,
Was able to get a few grams of fine powder which I collected to a tiny advil container which went to the freezer.
Gone try a blue gouda applying it with a spray (since the cheese is brined) or perhaps mixing with the curds and dry salting.
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